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2

The NHK Accent Dictionary contains a section on compound words, which has entries such as 〜体、〜生、〜力 etc. that explains the pattern they use for connecting to the previous word. It also has a very detailed appendix of how compound words work in general. It doesn't have any compound entries for things like 〜ぽい or 〜さ, but there are many full entries like 荒っぽい、...


9

Yes, your analysis is correct. In fact the し can drop even lower than the う before it if you choose to really enunciate it. This sort of splitting is fairly common, for example with the prefix 非 or the prefix 被. I consider it wrong to read that word in heiban, it'd sound like 調子・全的(??) or something like that. However, there are sometimes cases where words ...


4

The Wiktionary entry as I found it looks as follows: Pronunciation (Tokyo) わ[たし]【HH】 [wàtáshí] (Heiban – [0]) IPA: [[ɰᵝa̠ta̠ɕi]] Let's take a look what this means: (Tokyo) means the listed pronunciation is for the Tokyo dialect わ[たし]【HH】 pitch accent notation with [◯]【H】 indicating a high pitch [wàtáshí] indicating pitch accent in a romanization (using ...


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