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8

てしんぜよう means "I'll do you a favor", and it is a stereotypical phrase associated with samurais. Generally, it gives an arrogant impression (or, at least it signals that the speaker genuinely thinks of themselves to be "above" the conversation partner). It is only used when the speaker is supposed to be a samurai or similar. In this ...


6

Yes, こって is a corrupted form of ことで. It's rarely used in reality, and it usually has a scornful overtone in fiction, like in this scene. This ご苦労なこって may look like an appreciation, but it actually is a sarcasm. It's like "What a (pointless) effort" or "You're working hard for nothing". Zoro is saying Luffy is putting effort to something ...


6

Your first guess is correct. The 「は」here is the good ol' topic marking particle. The basic form of the phrase is 「気になる」, which can mean, among other things: to feel like (doing); to feel inclined to; to bring oneself to (do) ​usu. after a verb (WWWJDIC/jisho) どうして君はそれを信じる気になったのか。 What led you to believe it? 「気になれない」is the negation of the potential form and ...


5

Only ところで sounds right to me. It’s quite neutral in register. お伝えしたいことが is inappropriate for the same reason you suspected 言っておきたいことがあります might not be quite right, although it is less bad just because it doesn’t use the subsidiary verb おく. ときに in the sense of ところで sounds archaic. This means there is no good equivalent for “I just wanted to say …” in this ...


5

It's baseball jargon (see 3) for a type of fielding practice, but in this context the same term is used to mean repeated practice or drill in general. Thanks to goldbrick for clarifying the baseball jargon.


5

Basically yes, 国に帰る can be used in such a situation. 国(くに) in the expression is sometimes written as 故郷 (with the pronunciation くに), homeland. So 国に帰る can be used as long as the speaker perceives it as his/her homeland. As such in some cases 国に帰る may not be used or can be ambiguous - if A was born in the US and moved to Japan at the age of three, then A ...


4

They basically mean the same, but 凍りつく gives an impression that the resulting, frozen state is more firmly set and doesn’t easily melt. I believe the “up” in “freeze up” adds a similar nuance compared to just “freeze”.


3

I would describe 「V した+ことがある」as to convey having a certain experience determined by the verb. In English it is usually rendered as "have done something". In much the same vein, 「V した+ことがあった」also talks about having that experience, but the having itself is talked about as in the past. With あった there is a distance between that experience and the ...


3

I'm pretty certain this is basically お + 連用形 + になる. Actually we can find many instances of お仰せになる on the net, although I don't know if it's a typo, a misuse, or an uncommon but acceptable usage. Then why is お normally dropped? As Angelos pointed out, we say お教えになる, お思いになる and お納めになる, so just because a verb starts with お does not mean it refuses another お. ...


3

いい声 is "cool voice", not "meh voice". When it refers to a male voice, it typically refers to a low-frequency, dandy voice. Note that いい always means "good" rather than "not necessary" when it restrictively modifies the following noun. This 面白い is "funny" rather than "interesting". This これだけ is "...


2

The「これだけ」is modifying「いつもと違う」. It seems to describe a degree or amount of difference (ie. how much different from the usual). There is a hidden question embedded in the「どちらかというと」part. Judging from the context, you can understand it as (面白い声と面白くない声、)どちらかというと面白い声に聞こえます If I have to comment whether my voice sounds interesting or not, my voice sounds ...


2

I think you mention the sentence from Gintama "第69話「ゴミの分別回収にご協力下さい」". Kagura said "おはようございます。髪切った?" Someone tweeted the part. This is just a Joke. NOT idiom. I think it is too difficult to understand this joke for those who haven't lived in Japan for long time. To understand this Joke, you need to know the followings: The very famous TV ...


2

The less colloquial and more complete form is 何か違うような気がする, which means "I feel like something is odd" or "something is not quite right". It's used in many situations, including when you want to point out somebody's unreasonableness in a polite way, e.g.: 「あなたの仕事じゃ無いけど、指摘してくれたのはあなたなんだから、あなたがやってよ」 「な、なんか違うような。。。でもまぁいいよ」


2

She says それでは [soredewa] and it means “then”. In this context, それ [sore] (“that”) doesn’t refer to anything in particular. I can see why you heard it as それねは [sorenewa]. She speaks with a nasal voice throughout.


2

3次職 is "third-class jobs", "tier 3 job classes", "rank 3 jobs" or something like this. Typically, it is a kind of job a character can choose after mastering some 2次職 or 上級職 (advanced job), and you often have to clear some 試練-like event before actually upgrading your job. Ragnarok Online is probably one of the first games that ...


2

Japanese and English are very different in how they communicate information. A stand alone sentence in English can frequently be understood (even if only imperfectly) without any further context. Japanese is quite different. Just a simple verb alone is an entire sentence. 見たな What does this mean? It could mean: "I saw you", "you saw me&...


2

This 同じ is a 形容動詞 (called na-adjective in English) that modifies 一日 (a day). I wouldn't call 同じ一日 a set phrase like 今日も一日. It is just a noun phrase composed of an adjective and a noun. 同じ, when used before a noun that it modifies, often occurs without な. For example, 彼と同じ学校だ means "the same school as the one he attends" 今日はいつもと同じ一日だった。 Just means ...


1

今 means "now", and すっきりした is in the past tense. Therefore いまあたまがすっきりした means "My mind (just) cleared up now!", which is a correct sentence but doesn't fit the previous context ("after traveling for two weeks"). To fix this, you can do either of the following: Just remove いま: あたまがすっきりした Keep いま and use the teiru-form: いま(は)...


1

When I read the question, I was a little surprised to see the verb form of 仰せる. I did a little search of this verb form on the net, but in vain. 仰せ is a derived form of 仰す, which was rarely used as a verb in various forms except 仰せ. And 仰せ became used almost as a noun: 仰せの通り, 仰せ聞ける, 仰せつかる。For other examples, please have a look at this very interesting site 「...


1

I don't think there's just one term that could be used for all translations, as you said, it is highly contextual. っぽくない・らしくない This is used to describe something that you wouldn't expect of the subject. Your example with child labor, though grammatical, is unnatural. It's like saying, "Working in a factory is so un-child-like." (By the way, っぽいじゃない ...


1

So you could produce very direct translations involving the Japanese word for opinion, but I don't think that's what you're asking for. If what you're looking for is a natural, easy way to express English sentiments like what's your opinion on ~~? or most relevantly what do you think about ~~?, the phrase you want is probably をどう思う. The link includes plenty ...


1

ところ refers to a "place" either in a concrete or abstract manner. This means it can refer to a a point in time, a physical place, or a part or portion of something. I think you understand this. Your sentence is referring to a point in time. Here, だった and である is just modifying the point in time being referred to. であるところ would be a "non-past ...


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