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43

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as well: ...


22

I fell on my ass. 「尻餅{しりもち}をついた」 「私、しりもちついちゃった。」


20

You can simply use の: 今日は「評論」の「評」の漢字を覚えました。 ブラボーのB、デルタのD 「服を着る」の「着る」じゃなくて、「髪の毛を切る」方の「切る」です。


18

It's just standard GA-NO conversion. [日本人が知らない]日本語 'Japanese that [Japanese don't know]'


18

Direct translation rarely works between English and Japanese. When I, a Japanese-speaker, learned years ago that in English they say "My (language name) is rusty.", it took me by surprise because in Japanese 「錆{さ}びる = "to get rusty"」 is rarely used outside of a context regarding metal. A far more common and natural word choice would be: 「下手{へた}になる」 ...


18

今日という日 (literally "the day called today") is just an emphatic version of "today", or "this very day". This expression is commonly used in formal greetings and poems. (I tried jisho.org but got nothing related to "everyday". How did you come up with "everyday"?)


17

In a restaurant it is usually enough to simply ask for お箸を下さい. It is perfectly understood that that means "enough chopsticks for me [and my companions], please". Anything more specific is usually unnatural. If you do need to specify how many pairs of chopsticks exactly, you'd usually use 〜膳 -zen.


16

Perhaps you're looking for 幸せ太り (pronounced as しあわせぶとり due to rendaku). This word is not particularly positive nor negative/derogatory. Gaining weight itself is not a desirable thing, but some people may see it as an enviable evidence of happiness.


14

It means "I'm not good with alcohol" or "I don't like alcohol". Of course it can also mean "Alcohol is not good (for your health)" and "Alcohol is prohibited (in this event)", depending on the context. In general, ~がダメだ can mean "to be not good at ~" or "not to like ~". For example you can say サッカーはダメです, 彼は英語がダメです, etc.


13

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that these Japanese letters have anything to do with summer. These are mascots of Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., a company run by Takashi Murakami, the artist who painted this Google Doodle. Also note that the same mascots appear in the Winter Solstice Doodle, too.


13

"Bob says hi by the way." 「ところで、ボブがよろしくって。」 「そうだ、ボブがよろしくって。」 or 「ところで、ボブがハローって。」 or something similar. The above sentences are a casual way of saying the first sentence below: ところで、ボブが「よろしく」と言っていましたよ ところで、ボブが「よろしく」って言っていたよ ところで、ボブが「よろしく」って


13

The dictionary definitions 「明{あき}らかにする」 and 「明確{めいかく}にする」 would sound way too serious for stating/asking about breakfast times. The most natural phrases I could think of right now would be along the lines of: Statement: 「念{ねん}のために言{い}うと、朝食{ちょうしょく}は7時{じ}です。」 Question: 「念{ねん}のためにお聞{き}きしますが、朝食は7時ですね。」 Use a rising intonation at the end.


12

This one can be beautifully summarized by a simple quote from wiktionary: 語源[編集] どう、いたし・まし・て<「どう(どのように、何を)」+「いたす(「する」の謙譲語)」+「ます(丁寧語を造る助動詞)」+「て(反問的用法の終助詞)」)。 「何を、したというわけでもありませんよ(だから、気になさらないでください)」の意 It's fairly self explanatory, but to give a breakdown in english: どう = どのように いたす = する in humble language ます is the polite verb ending, but in te form.. ...


12

I think a simple one is 一日一歩{いちにちいっぽ} which in romaji is ichinichi ippo. This literally means "one day one step" and it bears the meaning of "one day at the time" in English. There is as well another way to express a similar meaning with 一日一日{いちにちいちにち}を着実{ちゃくじつ}に. In romaji ichinichi ichinichi wo chakujitsu ni. This is a bit hard to translate literally as ...


11

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


11

There is no word for 'it'. Japanese is a very contextual language and the 'it' will be inferred from context. To take some of your examples, if you are walking down the street and you say "it's cold" your friend will know what you mean without talking about weather. The 'it' adds absolutely no new/useful information. Similarly, if you say 寒{さむ}いですね your ...


11

「舞台{ぶたい}」 would be a fairly good word choice if you are referring to the opportunity to give a speech someplace.


10

背中を押す means "encourage someone to do something." It's a figurative expression meaning "to motivate someone to go ahead by pushing his / her back." For example: アメリカに留学しようかどうか迷っていたが、その時母親が背中を押してくれた I was hesitating to study in the United States, but my mom encouraged me to do so at that time. 我々は新製品を[市場化]{しじょうか}できるかどうか決めかねていたが、部長が背中を押してくれた We ...


10

Ari あり: The masu-stem of ある ("to exist", "to be"). The masu-stem of a verb sometimes works as a noun. So here あり means "(your) being", "current existence", etc. No の: The particle that connects two nouns. You must be familiar with this. Mama まま: A noun that means "the status like before", "the same manner", etc. It's almost always modified by another clause ...


10

I guess he is asking me about my well being. In fact, I don't think so. 幸せ usually doesn't mean normal well-being but only the full-of-joy state, that like whoever has their child. It's not a word you use to ask if somebody is fine. In this case, unless it's typo or mojibake, the final ? represents some degree of unsureness or hesitation towards previous ...


9

If you get a number of items from a convenience store in Japan the clerk will ask you how many chopsticks you want, and even these staff (not always the most educated of Japanese) will properly ask "ohashi nanzen" お箸何膳, i.e. how many (pairs of) chopsticks do you want? This is proper and natural and not bookish. I have never heard anyone use "hon" 本 as a ...


9

阿月地区を東西二つに分けて means "separate the Azuki district into two parts, east and west". You could insert a の, making it 東西の二つ, but the adverbial use without it is not uncommon for these "listing"-jukugo like 東西, 優劣, 大小 etc.


9

そこ literally means "there" so you can't just add ください to it. For "move", I think you would say: どいて。(informal) どいてください。(polite form of どいて, but still sounds informal) (ちょっと、)そこ、あけて。 (Lit. Make room there.) etc. To sound polite I think you could say: ちょっとあけてください。 ちょっとあけてくれませんか。 ちょっとあけてもらえますか。 ちょっとあけてもらえませんか。 ちょっとすみません。 etc...


9

(すみません、)[写真]{しゃしん}お[願]{ねが}いします。 would probably be understood as "Please take my/our picture", but it can also be understood as "May I take a photo of you?". To avoid confusion, you could say: (すみません、)シャッターお[願]{ねが}いします。  (すみません、)シャッター[押]{お}してください。 You can also say: (すみません、)[写真]{しゃしん}[撮]{と}ってください。 (すみません、)[写真]{しゃしん}[撮]{と}ってくれませんか。 (すみません、)[写真]{...


9

The expression 背中を押す literally means "to push [someone's] back", but it is often used idiomatically (just like in English) in the sense of "push [someone to do something]" or "help [someone to do something]". I think it can be used both in the sense of pushing someone to do something they're still hesitating to do, or helping/encouraging someone to do ...


9

舐(な)める has a broad meaning such as (1) to lick (a stamp), (2) taste (Popsicle / whisky), (3) experience (hardships) and (4) look down on / make light of (a person). 舐めた is an adjective form of ”舐(な)める” in (4) look down / take a derogatory attitude. “口をきく” means to talk / speak. “舐め口” is a shortened form of “舐めた口.” Therefore “舐め口をきく” means to speak in the ...


9

I think I understand your feeling, it sometimes happens that an expression that we are so used to using in English just doesn't exist in Japanese and it can be frustrating.   The closest you will get is probably 気が変わる. Which literally means I change my mind. But in most cases, it's best to just explain the situation. Using words such as やっぱり or 結局 can help ...


9

Is there a more general way to distinguish between 'cannot'/'does not' and 'will not' in Japanese, either explicitly or by changing the sentence structure? How about using 「~(よ)うとしない」 and 「~(する)つもりはない」 (or 「~(し)ないつもりだ」 depending on the context)? For example... 「男は名前を言わなかった。」 The man didn't/wouldn't tell her his name. 「男は名前を言おうとしなかった。」 The man ...


9

I'll give a few simple common phrases... [赤]{あか}ちゃんのおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。 かわいい or げんきな [赤]{あか}ちゃんのおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。 ご[出産]{しゅっさん}、おめでとうございます。 かわいい[女]{おんな}の[子]{こ}のおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。(← when the baby is a girl) げんきな[男]{おとこ}の[子]{こ}のおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。(← when the baby is a boy) Maybe you could add at the top... 祝・ご出産 For those who want ...


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