20

Unfortunately no word exactly represents only the union of kanji, hiragana and katakana. 漢字: kanji 仮名: kana; hiragana & katakana 字/文字: kanji, kana, punctuation, other written symbols 和字/和文: (typography term) kanji, kana, punctuation, fullwidth Latin letters etc. used in Japanese typesetting (as opposed to 欧文, or ordinary Latin typesetting symbols) I ...


18

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


18

In my feeling and personal experience "it's none of your business" is just one of those sentences you don't hear that often in Japan most likely because it's quite direct and (kind of) offensive. And as you know Japanese people tend to avoid this generally. That being said (and I might be wrong), it doesn't mean there is no way to say it. According to ...


17

Perhaps you're looking for 幸せ太り (pronounced as しあわせぶとり due to rendaku). This word is not particularly positive nor negative/derogatory. Gaining weight itself is not a desirable thing, but some people may see it as an enviable evidence of happiness.


15

You can use なる (to become) to indicate change, as follows: うまくなる (い-adjective, い->く) 上手になる (な-adjective + に) These both mean "to become good/skilled". Then for "to become more skilled" you can use もっと, さらに or 前より: もっと上手になる to become better さらに上手になる to become even better 前より上手になる to become better than before


15

I think you're referring to いかがですか ikaga desu ka which is the polite version of どうですか dou desu ka How are things? It can be used to ask "How are you?" in a polite way, but only with caution: いかがですか【ikaga desu ka】 is mostly used to mean "Would you like some?", so if you're holding something in your hand, one might assume you're offering to give ...


13

Semantically, I think you can leave out "I'm currently studying Japanese" if you're saying "My Japanese isn't (yet) very good," because it's pretty much implied. Your example sounds fine. You might also try things like: すみません、日本語はまだまだです。 すみません、日本語の[初心者]{しょ・しん・しゃ}ですので、あまり分かりません。


13

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


13

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


13

a simple way to say "See you soon" when the context is that you are talking to your friend remotely (via phone/messaging) and you plan to meet up with them in the very near future (1 or 2 hours). In that situation I would say 「じゃ、あとで。」(← casual) じゃ is the contracted pronunciation of では, literally "Then". あとで。 as a greeting is a shortened way of saying ...


12

I think a simple one is 一日一歩{いちにちいっぽ} which in romaji is ichinichi ippo. This literally means "one day one step" and it bears the meaning of "one day at the time" in English. There is as well another way to express a similar meaning with 一日一日{いちにちいちにち}を着実{ちゃくじつ}に. In romaji ichinichi ichinichi wo chakujitsu ni. This is a bit hard to translate literally as ...


11

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


11

If you just want to say "overrated," 「過大評価」 is the word for it. この役者は過大評価されている。 The antonym is 「過小評価」. 「高評価すぎる」 sounds a bit strange but would be fine it it were 「高く評価されすぎる」. I think 高評価 is used often in context that imply positive impressions, which doesn't match the negative nuance of "overrated." In general, 〜すぎる works for most of the time. You can ...


10

I would suggest 言いくるめる, which is like 説得する/説き伏せる, but implies the action is beneficial not to the target but to the subject. It does have the negative connotation like 騙す, but it's not as strong/evil/illegal as 騙す. You can also use 丸め込む and 口車【くちぐるま】に乗せる. 彼をうまく言いくるめて、地図を買わせよう。 店員に言いくるめられて、3万円もする服を買わされてしまった。別に欲しくなかったのに。 彼の口車には乗るな。 Don't be cajoled ...


10

She probably said [三日坊主]{みっかぼうず}. 三日坊主 literally means "three-day monk". It's a proverb/saying used to describe someone who can't stick to anything for a long time, or the act/situation of giving up one's resolution easily. I think this page explains the word beautifully: "It is used to describe people who start things with big promises and great ...


10

嘘だよ is likely to mean "I am joking." One way to say "you are lying" is to use an interrogative form: 嘘だろ!? / 冗談だろ!? Isn't that a joke? マジかよ!? Really!? Examples above are very casual. Of course we can make them formal by using 敬語: 嘘ですよね? / 冗談ですよね? 本当ですか? (note that マジ is a casual saying of 本当). If we use a normal sentence, it might ...


9

I think the closest approximation is 訳【わけ】が分からない (lit. reason is not understandable). 日本語の数え方は訳が分からない。 This is an informal expression, and depending on the context, this can be used to express your subjective, personal confusion (does not make sense to me): 日本語の数え方は私にとって訳が分からない。 ... and to express that something is objectively a mess: ...


9

It's actually an observation of the Japanese people written by a Jesuit missionary: "[The Japanese people] are so crafty in their hearts that nobody can understand them. Whence it is said that they have three hearts: a false one in their mouths for all the world to see, another within their breasts only for their friends, and the third in the depths ...


9

ウイルス等が検出されませんでした sounds more like "No virus were detected", which is different from "Virus-free". The first thing I'd like to mention is that most sophisticated Japanese e-commerce sites do not say anything like this in their download pages, at least in a large font. To me, saying "virus free" loudly already smells like typical foreign sites (some of which ...


9

Another is: うそつけ (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}け)! - Liar! Comes from 嘘{うそ}をつく, to lie From comments: うそつき (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}き) - Liar; Someone who lies


9

In this scenario what would the Japanese equivalent be to asking "Are you sure?" or "Is something bothering you?"? I would say: 「ホントに?」 (Are you sure? / Really?) 「ホントに大丈夫?」 (Are you sure you're okay?) 「どうかしたの?」 (Is something bothering you? / Is there something wrong?) 「どうしたの?」 (What's wrong?) Japanese speakers would respond in a less ...


9

In my feeling and personal experience "it's none of your business" is just one of those sentences you don't hear that often in Japan most likely because it's quite direct and (kind of) offensive. And as you know Japanese people tend to avoid this generally.   <from Tommy's answer> We don't say this kind of direct phrase to others usually in Japan, ...


9

To add to 「[眉]{まゆ}をしかめる」「眉をひそめる」 given in the other answer, I think you could also use... [眉間]{みけん}にしわを[寄]{よ}せる


9

I'll give a few simple common phrases... [赤]{あか}ちゃんのおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。 かわいい or げんきな [赤]{あか}ちゃんのおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。 ご[出産]{しゅっさん}、おめでとうございます。 かわいい[女]{おんな}の[子]{こ}のおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。(← when the baby is a girl) げんきな[男]{おとこ}の[子]{こ}のおたんじょう、おめでとうございます。(← when the baby is a boy) Maybe you could add at the top... 祝・ご出産 For those who want more formal phrases... ご出産、...


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