18

In my feeling and personal experience "it's none of your business" is just one of those sentences you don't hear that often in Japan most likely because it's quite direct and (kind of) offensive. And as you know Japanese people tend to avoid this generally. That being said (and I might be wrong), it doesn't mean there is no way to say it. According to ...


17

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


16

Beside 勘定 (or 勘定書) mentioned by Louis, お会計【かいけい】 is also a very common way to refer to the bill: お会計をください お会計お願いします I believe 会計 has a more general nuance than 勘定 ("bill", rather than "check"), meaning it can be used in some instances where 勘定 would not fit. For restaurants, they are essentially interchangeable. The gesture described by Louis (...


16

Perhaps you're looking for 幸せ太り (pronounced as しあわせぶとり due to rendaku). This word is not particularly positive nor negative/derogatory. Gaining weight itself is not a desirable thing, but some people may see it as an enviable evidence of happiness.


15

It sounds like you are looking for the vocative case particle in Japanese. Taken from wikipedia's article on vocative case: In archaic Japanese, or when written as verse, a particle よ and や may be affixed. 少年よ、大志を抱け (Boys, be ambitious, quote by William S. Clark) 神よ、汝の誉れはその御名のごとく (O God, Thy praise is according to Thine name, from Bach'...


15

You can use なる (to become) to indicate change, as follows: うまくなる (い-adjective, い->く) 上手になる (な-adjective + に) These both mean "to become good/skilled". Then for "to become more skilled" you can use もっと, さらに or 前より: もっと上手になる to become better さらに上手になる to become even better 前より上手になる to become better than before


14

Unfortunately no word exactly represents only the union of kanji, hiragana and katakana. 漢字: kanji 仮名: kana; hiragana & katakana 字/文字: kanji, kana, punctuation, other written symbols 和字/和文: (typography term) kanji, kana, punctuation, fullwidth Latin letters etc. used in Japanese typesetting (as opposed to 欧文, or ordinary Latin typesetting symbols) I ...


13

You have to read the last sentence in the next paragraph to get your specific answer. I borrowed a good letter example from a site with a lot of business templates. First of all, you have to say the addressee's name, career, and you have to say "Sama", and it should be delimited with line breaks and followed by two line breaks (Or maybe carriage returns. ...


13

Semantically, I think you can leave out "I'm currently studying Japanese" if you're saying "My Japanese isn't (yet) very good," because it's pretty much implied. Your example sounds fine. You might also try things like: すみません、日本語はまだまだです。 すみません、日本語の[初心者]{しょ・しん・しゃ}ですので、あまり分かりません。


13

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


13

A very common (and mature-sounding) phrase would be 「[差]{さ}し[支]{つか}えなければ」. 「差し支え」 means "obstacle", "inconvenience", etc. 「差し支えなければ、ご[職業]{しょくぎょう}をお[聞]{き}きしてもよろしいですか。」 You may add a 「もし」 at the beginning as well. Other natural expressions would include: Polite:「(もし)お[尋]{たず}ねしてもよろしければ」 Less polite:「もし聞いてもよければ」


13

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


12

心掛ける is a good one to learn. 毎日Xをするように心掛けている。 I'm working hard at doing X everyday. Also, 努める or 努力する 毎日Xをするように努める(努力する) If you overly use 頑張る, it sounds strange, especially when you use it for things like "reading a newspaper". You should use it for something more "important" like studying for a test or trying to get a job or something.


12

I think you're referring to いかがですか ikaga desu ka which is the polite version of どうですか dou desu ka How are things? It can be used to ask "How are you?" in a polite way, but only with caution: いかがですか【ikaga desu ka】 is mostly used to mean "Would you like some?", so if you're holding something in your hand, one might assume you're offering to give ...


12

That would be 「猫{ねこ}に注意{ちゅうい}」-- 「ねこにちゅうい」 in all kana.


12

I think a simple one is 一日一歩{いちにちいっぽ} which in romaji is ichinichi ippo. This literally means "one day one step" and it bears the meaning of "one day at the time" in English. There is as well another way to express a similar meaning with 一日一日{いちにちいちにち}を着実{ちゃくじつ}に. In romaji ichinichi ichinichi wo chakujitsu ni. This is a bit hard to translate literally as ...


12

a simple way to say "See you soon" when the context is that you are talking to your friend remotely (via phone/messaging) and you plan to meet up with them in the very near future (1 or 2 hours). In that situation I would say 「じゃ、あとで。」(← casual) じゃ is the contracted pronunciation of では, literally "Then". あとで。 as a greeting is a shortened way of saying ...


11

Anyone who took formal courses on Japanese would have learned this pattern: X-eba X hodo Y. The more you stir, the faster the salt dissolves. 混ぜれば混ぜるほど塩が混ざるのは早いです。 The colder the weather, the more time it takes for snow to melt. 雪が解けるのは寒ければ寒いほど時間がかかります。


11

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


11

If you just want to say "overrated," 「過大評価」 is the word for it. この役者は過大評価されている。 The antonym is 「過小評価」. 「高評価すぎる」 sounds a bit strange but would be fine it it were 「高く評価されすぎる」. I think 高評価 is used often in context that imply positive impressions, which doesn't match the negative nuance of "overrated." In general, 〜すぎる works for most of the time. You can ...


11

You could say: ・「ファイト!」 ・「気楽{きらく}にね!」 ・「うまくいきますように!」 ・「しっかりね!」 ・「応援{おうえん}してま~す!」 ・「(ご)成功{せいこう}を祈{いの}ってます!♡」 I could go all night long with this, but as you seem to know, none of these will ever be nearly as common as the plain ol' 「がんばって」.


10

It can be translated as 聞いたことがない 聞いたことのない歌です。 宮崎賢治のことを聞いたことがありません。


10

It is 「[鉄]{てつ}は[熱]{あつ}いうちに[打]{う}て」 and every Japanese-speaker would be familiar with this saying. English to Japanese: http://www.wa.commufa.jp/~anknak/ (Click where it says 「英語ことわざのABC順分類」)


10

I would suggest 言いくるめる, which is like 説得する/説き伏せる, but implies the action is beneficial not to the target but to the subject. It does have the negative connotation like 騙す, but it's not as strong/evil/illegal as 騙す. You can also use 丸め込む and 口車【くちぐるま】に乗せる. 彼をうまく言いくるめて、地図を買わせよう。 店員に言いくるめられて、3万円もする服を買わされてしまった。別に欲しくなかったのに。 彼の口車には乗るな。 Don't be cajoled ...


10

She probably said [三日坊主]{みっかぼうず}. 三日坊主 literally means "three-day monk". It's a proverb/saying used to describe someone who can't stick to anything for a long time, or the act/situation of giving up one's resolution easily. I think this page explains the word beautifully: "It is used to describe people who start things with big promises and great ...


10

Another is: うそつけ (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}け)! - Liar! Comes from 嘘{うそ}をつく, to lie From comments: うそつき (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}き) - Liar; Someone who lies


9

Usually that construction is achieved by using 「限り」. 知る限り (as far as one knows) できる限り (as far as possible) 生きている限り (as long as one lives) 私に関する限り (as far as I'm concerned, i.e. "for my part [but I won't speak for others, because they disagree with me]") The construction in your second sentence ("as far as I'm concerned") is usually ...


9

There are also several other grammar patterns that express "as one thing changes (grows/increases/decreases/etc.) another thing changes with it" (the key is that both things are changing). 名詞 (noun) 動詞の辞書形 (verb in dictionary form) する動詞の名詞 (the noun of a suru-verb) (2 or 3) + につれて (cannot express volition or intention, but the rest can). アニメが[流行]...


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