8

You can definitely personify objects in Japanese. 慣性のある物体は運動状態を維持したがる is not wrong per se, but firstly, it's obvious to the listener that a personification is going on, and secondly, the colloquial feeling that the personification creates might not go well with the scientific feel of the rest of the sentence. A more natural translation might be ...


8

I agree with you that たち is normally used with animate objects. One obvious exception for this rule is when explicit personification is involved. For example, sentences like 山たちが私に語りかけてきた, 乱暴に扱われた本たちが悲しんでいる are perfectly fine. In your question, I think this アプリたち doesn't look that weird to me. Of course I'm not saying アプリたち is a kind of personification, but ...


4

There's no firm distinction between たち and ら at least in modern spoken Japanese except that the latter may sound old-fashioned. For the particular quote above, it sounds a bit like a translation from English, as is common with tech curated blogs. But it's still within natural and common Japanese of today. あと、日本語では複数形は特に明示しないことが多いのをお忘れなく。 公園で子供が水鉄砲で遊んでいる。...


1

I think using "want" in this way sounds weird even in English. Some better words to use would be "tends", "apt", or "inclined". This can be expressed as 〜傾向がある. Or if it is a negative tendency, 〜嫌いがある.


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