11

The ultimate answer to your question is "Japanese is different from English". I understand you want a reason, but there may not be a good reason. Some English transitive verbs are translated using a Japanese intransitive verb, and vice versa. For each verb, you have to remember the correct particle, one by one. Intransitive in English, Transitive in ...


6

The latter is wrong. You should use quotative-と because 食べる is what is concretely written on paper. ~を書く is okay when the object is something abstract such as 文字, 漢字, 手紙 and 物語. EDIT: Actually, as @broccoliforest pointed out, 「食べる」を書く is also acceptable in a rare context where the "message" or "content" is not relevant. If you say 「食べる」を書く, it sounds like ...


6

For questions about when you can and cannot use は, I generally find a good rule of thumb is to try translating any "(something) + は" to "as for (something)" or "regarding (something)" in English, and see how it sounds: 私{わたし}の名前{なまえ}はジョンです As for my name, (it) is John. Just as with は, "as for ___" has similar implications about bringing up some subject ...


6

咲【さき】は電池{でんち}を時計{とけい}に入{い}れました。 As noted in the comments, the verb in your sample sentence is 入【い】れます・入【い】れる, not 入【はい】ります・入【はい】る. The former with れ is the transitive form meaning "to put something into something else", whereas the latter with り or る is the intransitive form meaning "to enter into something". Since the verb in your sample sentence is ...


5

To answer your question, only をしている is correct and がしている is wrong in this example. Actually, those two are confusingly similar but unrelated. What the verb する means in the two idioms are different things. がする → to strike the (i.e. your) sensation をする → to wear some (persistent) traits がする is to describe an ephemeral sense (stimulus) that can appear and ...


5

答える is a transitive verb, too. 明鏡国語辞典 says: こたえる【答える】 🈩〘他下一〙相手の質問などに対して、言葉を返す。返事をする。「問われるままにありのままを答えた」 🈔〘自下一〙問題を解いて答えを出す。解答する。「次の問いに答えよ」 So in your examples: 「質問に答える」 ← the 答える is intransitive 「意味を答える」 ← the 答える is transitive As a side note, verbs that can be both transitive and intransitive include: [開]{ひら}く -- 「ドアが開く」「傘を開く」 [閉]{と}じる -- 「...


4

AをBと合わせる basically means putting A and B together. B is something similar to A. ケチャップをマヨネーズと合わせる: two sauces are mixed マスクをドリンクと合わせて売る: two items are treated as a set あなたの計画を私(の計画)と合わせる: two plans are merged, forming a bigger plan 君の答えを彼の答えと合わせなさい: two answers are placed together and compared (the speaker wants you to check his answer and see the ...


4

This を is still an object marker, but the corresponding verb is omitted because it can be inferred from the context. This happens very often in slogans, headlines and lyrics. You can see some examples here: Does the particle "を" (wo) have a special use when at the end of a sentence? Is it a right interpretation of the line of this Japanese song? ...


4

Well, generally every language has some quirks in its grammar, but as for your examples, を is the only option and に is never used. I sense from your statement "I would've thought に would be used in place, but instead を is used" that you may think or be taught that case particles each represent some kind of "universal" trait, but they are actually decided by ...


4

この面白い話を落語と言い、落語をする人を落語家といいます。 In both parts of this sentence を is followed by a verb. The verb is 言う. There is nothing in Japanese grammar that says the verb must come immediately after を. You've probably heard that word order can be quite flexible in Japanese. This is possible because we know what the part of speech is from the attached particle. In these ...


4

Both are grammatical, and it's a matter of preference to a certain degree. Generally speaking, が/を at the end of an embedded question before a verb is usually omitted unless you want to emphasize the embedded question. リンゴマークがあるか(を)確認します。 彼女がどこにいるか(が)分かりません。 ハートマークではなくリンゴマークがあるかを確認してください。 どうやるのかではなく、なぜやるのかが分かりません。 What I don't understand is why ...


4

This type of ほう is used to make the sentence sound euphemistic and/or courteous. According to 明鏡国語辞典第2版: 方 ④ 物事をぼかしていったり遠回しにいったりする。多く、ぼかすことで慎み深い気持ちを表す。 「金融の方に勤めています」「お仕事の方は順調ですか」 So 準備のほうを is a milder/politer equivalent of 準備を, and the omitted verb is simply してください or しなさい. Maybe Sunako used ほう because she knew she was going to interrupt Ayane. ...


3

I suppose the one sentence answer is that 合格する is an intransitive verb and so it cannot use を to indicate the object. There's two things to note here I think: する-verbs can be either intransitive, transitive, or both. Only transitive verbs can use the direct object marker を. 合格 (intransitive) 検索{けんさく} (transitive): 索引{さくいん}で関係事項{かんけいじこう}を検索する (...


3

を marks a direct object. This is a noun that has something done to it. For example, it can be thrown, kicked, eaten, etc. Transitive verbs (verbs were something is done to something else) are what take を in this case. To become is a verb that does not take a direct object. It is an intransitive verb, meaning it happens on its own. In English, some ...


2

You already seem to vaguely understand the difference, but to summarize: noun + ~を聞く = I hear [noun]: You hear a sound/music/story/etc. 窓が割れるのを聞いた means your heard the cracking noise. clause + ~と聞く = I hear that [clause]: You hear some fact (via conversations/news/etc). 窓が割れたと聞いた means you heard the news from someone but did not hear the noise itself. In ...


2

So, I'm grasping at straws a little, but I can see some sort of logic... I would say that この公園では猿が子供を育てている(x)ところ(を)写真に撮ることが出来る。 is the right way to fill in the blanks. I feel like you need the を somewhere if the 写真 isn't being 撮る’d. So why is the 猿が子供を育てているところ is being 撮る’d in my suggestion? To explain that, I think it's helpful to view the とる family of ...


2

'親切で有難う' is wrong. '親切を有難う' is acceptable, but '親切にしてくれてありがとう' is much more natural. More politely: 親切にしてくださりありがとうございます。 More formally (e.g. in a letter): (貴殿の / 皆様の)ご親切に感謝申し上げます。


2

If you are simply trying to have an object with an intransitive verb, the answer is no. Intransitive verbs do not take on direct objects, and therefore will never be used in conjunction with を marking the direct object. Using を with intransitive verbs will most definitely sound unnatural. I got called out on it a lot as I was learning. You can, however,...


1

The post by ajsmart makes some good points. I'd like to add to that, since I also note that there's a key difference in terminology here that may be causing confusion. English transitive / intransitive In English, a transitive verb must take an object, and an intransitive verb must not take an object. Also, transitivity is usually described in terms of ...


1

Ok your question is really quite general about particles, so I'm going to give some general advice. 1: Instead of reducing each individual situation or sentence to a 'do I use wa or ga here?' question, try to think of the overall meaning of the particles instead. If you grasp the deeper meaning of the particles, you will start to understand the answer ...


1

I read that に is used for indicating places of existence, target recipient [of something], the occasion, or the source of receiving an item. (There may be some I have missed.) I also read that を is for objects of a transitive verb (meaning a verb that needs something to receive the action it indicates). If I remember or know correctly, の is used before a ...


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