19

I think exceptionally using 「を」 with normally 「が」-marked words is not something unique to 「好き」 and 「嫌い」. Let me start by expanding the scope of your question: the other questions you linked to explain why 「が」 can turn into 「を」 under 「〜と[certain verbs]」; they did not explain why things like 「私は太郎が猫を嫌いな理由は未だに分からない。」 are just fine. So I think why 「が」 can ...


19

The verb is 行{おこな}う not 行く。 They both conjugate to 行った in the past tense so it can look confusing, but as you have just experienced, the context can make it clear which one it is. 日本についてのアンケートを中国人100人に行{おこな}った。 Carried out/Conducted a survey about Japan on 100 Chinese people.


15

Most of this answer is basically subjective, but there's a lot going on in this question that I think should be addressed. The tldr version: Yes, を is frequently used in "real" Japanese. But if I may offer my 2 cents.. Be careful not to get ahead of yourself in your assumptions about what is and isn't "real" Japanese. Sure, 私は is often dropped, but only ...


14

AをBだ in isolation makes little sense (although there are exceptions). This ~を~だと is a common pattern which appears along with various verbs for assuming, regarding, etc. AをBだと見なす to regard A as B AをBだと考える to consider A B AをBだと仮定する to assume A is B AをBだとする to suppose A as B AをBだと思う to think of A as B AをBだと勘違いする to mistake A as B AをBだと思い込む to make a wrong ...


12

The ultimate answer to your question is "Japanese is different from English". I understand you want a reason, but there may not be a good reason. Some English transitive verbs are translated using a Japanese intransitive verb, and vice versa. For each verb, you have to remember the correct particle, one by one. Intransitive in English, Transitive in ...


11

子供を本を読ませる is ungrammatical, and you have to say 子供に本を読ませる. Here are the basic rules for causation: For verbs which take を, the agent (or "causee") is marked with に. Such verbs are usually transitive verbs, but some intransitive verbs take を, too. For verbs which don't take を (i.e., most intransitive verbs), the agent is marked with を. In your question, 読む ...


11

あまり詳しい説明ではないのですが、明鏡国語辞典によりますと・・・ なに【何】 🈩〘代〙 ❸《「ーを・・・か?」「ーを・・・のだ!」など、疑問・反語・詰問などを表す自動詞文で》不審の気持ちで、事態成立の基盤を問う。また、その不当性を非難する。どんな理由で。なぜに。なんで。 「何を泣いているのか?」「何をためらうことがあろうか」「何をぐずぐずしてるんだ!」 (語法)他動詞の場合は、~ヲに対する普通の疑問を表す。「何を読んでるの?」


11

First of all, to answer the unasked question, this usage of を is acceptable. In English, as you are no doubt aware, sometimes we need a phrase to describe our nouns. For example: This is an air conditioning shoe. The extra information, though far fetched, tells us why our noun of interest (shoe) is special. Likewise in Japanese we have phrases that modify ...


11

What does をり in the last line mean? I have a feeling that it is intentionally written in this way and not as おり (which comes from 居る) There are two parts to this question, though it seems you probably didn't realize that when you wrote it. :) Part 1: What is this word をり? This is 居【を】り. It is indeed intentionally written this way, but it is actually from ...


10

I think you probably meant to write: 私は日本語が悪いです。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is bad.) 私の日本語は悪いです。(Lit. My Japanese is bad.) The word 悪い is a literal translation of the English 'bad'. In Japanese, you don't use 悪い to say you're not good at something. Instead, I recommend saying: 私は日本語が[下手]{へた}です。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is poor/unskillful.) 私は日本語が[上手]...


9

You can say: 日本で英語を教えたい。書道の勉強もしたい。 which literally means "I want to teach English in Japan. I want to do the study of calligraphy, too." You could also say: 日本で英語を教えたい。書道も勉強したい。or 書道も[習]{なら}いたい。 where も is replacing を. (書道をも is grammatically correct but sounds literary and maybe a bit archaic.) You're right that (1) 私も書道を勉強したい is like saying "...


9

を is actually inputted as "wo", and should technically be pronounced as such as well, but that kana is almost completely unused except for the particle for verbs. And for a complicated reason, the pronunciation for particles is slightly different that the way to write it and becomes "o".


9

[あの信号を][ひだりへ]曲がってください。 あの信号を continues to 曲がってください, not to ひだりへ. (I mean, it's not 「あの信号の/をひだり」.) あの信号を and ひだりへ both modify verb 曲がる. あの信号を曲がる make a turn at that signal あの信号をひだりへ曲がる lit. make a turn to the left at that signal → turn left at that signal 曲がる is an intransitive verb. Noun+を used with intransitive motion verbs, such as 歩く, 行く, 出る, 飛ぶ, ...


8

は and を can be interchangeable when it is put after object, but there are some exceptions. The most typical usage of を indicate the word is object. すしを食べません。 means 私はすしを食べません。 which can be translated as "I don't eat sushi." And the most typical usage of は is to indicate the word is subject. 私はすしを食べません。 means I don't eat sushi. は also can be used to ...


8

Think like this: All nouns in Japanese are uncountable. You can't count apples any more than you count water or light. Thus under Japanese grammar you always have to say "two 'objects' of apple", "four 'sticks' of banana" and "seven 'bodies' of dog", as if they are "two bottles of water" or "four rays of light" etc. りんご一つ/一個 an object of apple = an apple ...


8

を is always an object marker in modern Japanese. It never replaces personal pronouns. Where did you see such a rule? noun + を at the end of a sentence is a fairly common device found in lyrics, slogans, posters and such. In general, it often means "I/We want/need ~" or "Give ~". 彼女にお茶を。 (lit. "(we need) Tea to her") Serve her a cup of tea. 犯罪者に死を! ...


8

To answer your question, only をしている is correct and がしている is wrong in this example. Actually, those two are confusingly similar but unrelated. What the verb する means in the two idioms are different things. がする → to strike the (i.e. your) sensation をする → to wear some (persistent) traits がする is to describe an ephemeral sense (stimulus) that can appear and ...


8

If you were marking location, consider what you'd really be saying in English. I brush on my teeth, wash on my face, and have breakfast every day. When you're using で you'd indicating where the action is occurring. Consider how odd this sounds in English. It's the same in Japanese: unless there's something on your teeth that you were brushing or ...


7

According to Hamano and Tsujioka (2011), the difference between を and が with the potential form is that を has a slightly stronger sense of volition than が does. They give the examples A: 阿部さんは英語を話せます。 B: 阿部さんは英語が話せます。 and they translate both sentences as "Mr. Abe can speak English". According to their definition, sentence A has a stronger sense of Mr....


7

(Here I'm trying to show why 四方を海に囲まれる is not direct passive. Please see this as an appendix to broccoliforest's answer and reply to KentaroTomono's comment.) First, OP's second sentence 四方が海に囲まれる is direct passive. Wikipedia defines「直接受身は、能動文における直接目的語または間接目的語を主語にするものである。」(source). Following this definition, a direct passive sentence is formed this way: ...


7

出る is not a normal motion verb. Xに出る means to participate in X. For example, カタン大会に出る would mean to participate in a Settlers of Catan tournament. を出る means to leave a place.  see Differences between 出るand 去る when expressing someone leaving Why does 出る accepts を although it is an intransitive verb?


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