7

The way I have come to understand よ and ね, is that they mark ownership over a piece of information being used in conversation. よ marks a piece of information as being the speaker's, while ね marks it as being someone else's. This is known as epistemics within conversation analysis. For instance, if we look at the phrase "お兄さんは歯医者だよね?", the speaker expresses ...


7

I believe this is the vocative よ, similar in meaning and usage to the English O. EDict mentions this meaning: (2) (after a noun) used when calling out to someone 恋人よ、我に帰れ。 Lover, come back to me. Japanese Wikipedia has this example from Latin: Quo vadis, domine? 主よ、いずこへ行き給う You could translate the sentence as "O Satan the Hero, make a miracle ...


4

According to Jisho.org here, よ in the given sentece is defined as "3 used to catch one's breath or get someone's attention ​in mid-sentence". よ Particle indicates certainty, emphasis, contempt, request, etc.​at sentence-end 1000円かそこらで買えますよ。You can buy it for a thousand yen or so. used when calling out to someone​after a noun 恋人よ、我に帰れ。...


2

The particle "de" 「で」 doesn't just mark the location where something happens. It's also used to mark the means by which something happens. Which can include more direct things like "the tool by which an action was performed" (e.g. I went to Tokyo by bullet train - densha de Tokyo ni itta) but can also mark more abstract ideas. So "futari de" 「二人で」 means "by ...


2

I don’t agree with your definition. You don’t use it just because the other person does’t know something or you want emphasize what you think is important. The point is gap of recognition between the speaker and the listener. For example, 楽しいよ implies that the other person is not enjoyed enough as you think they should, and you are trying to change their ...


2

This の is "explanatory-no". I hope you already know this の because it appears in many formal sentences. Semantically the sentence is the same as 名前を呼んでいるのだ/です. This よ after の is a feminine sentence-end particle (Note that explanatory-の is a kind of noun). It adds a small emphasis (like English "you know", "yeah", etc). The second よ after 気付いて is also a ...


2

「逃{に}げるんだよ!」 First of all, 「ん」 is the informal/colloquial form of 「の」. 「Verb in Dictionary Form + のだ/んだ」 makes an earnest kind of request similar to an order. 「の/ん」 often gives an explanatory and/or persuasive tone to what one says and that is how it is functioning here as well. The shortest words can do so much singlehandedly in Japanese. 「逃げろ!」 ...


1

…からよ can be interpreted as two usages. One is a sentence ender with だ omitted, in other words, it's interchangeable to …からだよ, albeit it's slang among women in a certain generation or 役割語 for female characters. (静かね is parallel to this.) The other one is filler usage, this time, it's not interchangeable to …からだよ but just added to the sub clause …から, which ...


1

I see translation failed. "yume no naka futari de ita yone" is "Both you and me were in same dream, weren't we". This is included part of yone.


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