10

The phrase 「鬼【おに】は外【そと】、福【ふく】は内【うち】」 is said during the 豆まき mamemaki performed as part of 節分 Setsubun. It is often recited rhythmically [●]{オ}[●]{ニ}[●]{ワ}[●]{ー}[●]{ソ}[●]{ト}○○[●]{フ}[●]{ク}[●]{ワ}[●]{ー}[●]{ウ}[●]{チ}○○ Just writing 「鬼は外、福は内」 just looks/reads very ordinary, so here the small ぁ is added to convey the (rhythmical) sound of the children singing/...


7

For questions about when you can and cannot use は, I generally find a good rule of thumb is to try translating any "(something) + は" to "as for (something)" or "regarding (something)" in English, and see how it sounds: 私{わたし}の名前{なまえ}はジョンです As for my name, (it) is John. Just as with は, "as for ___" has similar implications about bringing up some subject ...


7

僕にはな、ちゃんとした名前が... The な is a particle. It's used as a filler here. This person is trying to say something like: 僕には(な)、ちゃんとした名前がある(んだ)。 XXに(は)YYがある means "There's YY in XX" / "XX has YY".


6

That machine-translation is correct. の after 実 is a subject marker. This 実のある is the same as 実がある, which is a relative clause that modifies 話. 実のある話 (=実がある話) literally means "a story where a fruit exists". This 実 ("fruit") figuratively refers to something meaningful. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? (Note that の meaning "...


5

Assuming you already know the basics, here are the relevant rules you may be missing: が is normally used to mark subjects in subordinate clauses. But は is still used in subordinate clauses when contrastive meaning is important. Both contrastive-は and exhaustive-listing-が "emphasize" something before it, but in different ways. Therefore, 私が死んだら is the ...


4

This may be disappointing to hear, but there's no major difference between 外は寒いので(…) and 外が(…) unless you imagine peculiar situations. (That's why native speakers produced both of those sentences.) Why is that? That's because using vs not using は heavily depends on context. From what I understand, double は is used for comparisons. Where the first は ...


4

It may seem that you can grammatically replace that というのは with は, in fact not. The last word 先 (part of the idiom 目と鼻の先) is certainly a noun, but if we take what comes before というのは as a noun phrase, the part 十香のいる水族館と will fail to parse, because Japanese particles cannot modify noun alone unlike English prepositions. Instead, it is a clause with the last ...


4

日本は神社が多い。 日本には多くの神社があります。 I copied these sentences from the other answer, who was correct to point out the grammar errors. There is, however a difference in meaning between these two sentences. In written, concise English, you may get the same translation for these sentences, but they are not the same thing in Japanese. To put is simply, it's a matter of ...


3

Sometimes the N2 in that pattern is omitted, either if it is clearly understood or if the causal agent is not known or is unclear. In your sentence, N1 is understood to be the speaker, N3 is 荷物, and N2 is omitted. If you imagine that N2 is something like 荷物係 (baggage handler) then it might make more sense to you.


3

In the title 『四月は君の嘘』, the 「は」 is the so-called "topic marker" in Japanese. It is a particle of speech that introduces the "topic of discourse", and is a fundamental element of Japanese grammar. In this sentence, it basically tells the listener that the context of "Your Lie" was "April". 「は」 is probably one of the first things you encounter when studying ...


3

I think I might know what it means, but I apologize if my explanation is not that good. I believe the verb here is 居る (iru), thus, your sentence would translate like "There's no way that there is a cat (or cats) that sit in such (stiff) manner." いる is not written a lot of times with its kanji so maybe that's why it was not so clear at first. In the sentence,...


3

Let me just explain how your example sentences feel like. Please refer to the previous questions for the generic explanation about those particles. あなたの目はきれいです implies that one's eyes are pretty, but not rest of the their body No, that's not correct. This is usually a plain neutral sentence that just means "(I know) Your eyes are (...


3

When you use a quotative-と, the "quote" will basically be a normal non-polite sentence. That is, you can safely use は inside the quote, and you should not drop だ. Brackets are usually not used in a simple case like this. Therefore, the correct sentence is: 私は彼はいい人だと思う。 The polite version is: 私は彼はいい人だと思います。 As you may already know, 私は is normally ...


3

Good question! This question is an actually an entire topic. For example, see this article. So we have four patterns here: (1) 木が浮く (2) 木は浮く (3) 木が浮きやすい (4) 木は浮きやすい The short answer is that they are all correct grammatically. However, they have slightly different nuances. "は" is called the topic particle for good reason; it marks what the ...


3

君の出身地にどこがありますか? I'm sorry to say that this sentence (using に) is not grammatically correct. に is a particle that indicates: Direction of movement. Place of existence Destination Result of Change Object of a verb Source (of a verb) Specific time The Japanese equivalent of the English 'per' (as in 'three meals per day') You can read more about the に ...


3

I'm going to answer your question anyway to the best of my ability, but I'll start off by saying you really shouldn't try to take English ways of expressing things and try to map them particularly into another language, particularly one as alien to English as Japanese is. The way the two languages prefer to represent things generally involve very different ...


2

You are correct in your analysis. The first は establishes the topic as この映画館で ("at this movie theater"). What came prior in the conversation was not talking about この映画館. Then, 水曜日は implies that the price is what it is on Wednesday, as compared to another day / other days when the price is something else (contrastive marker).


2

修身 is an old word for "moral class/education", and 道徳観 is "ethical view" or "idea of morality". 私のそれ is "that of myself", i.e., "my own 道徳観". 私のそれ is interchangeable with 私の here; it's jut two ways of saying "mine". は after 私のそれと is optional, and I think it can be understood simply as a contrastive-wa. その道徳観は私のと大いに矛盾していた equally makes sense. Besides, ...


2

First of all, 人は公園で歩いている sounds unnatural. To match the English translation, you should say その人は公園を歩いている. See this for this を. Second, despite your observation, その人は公園を歩いている and 公園をその人は歩いている have the same basic meaning, although the latter is a little unusual and thus sounds like 公園 is emphasized. In both sentences, 公園を adverbially modifies 歩いている, not (その)人....


2

Technically speaking, は in a negative sentence specifies what's negated. (Note that it's practically not necessarily the case depending on verbal emphasis.) 今日は勉強をしない (You may study another day.) 今日、勉強はしない (You may do other things.) Practically, however, people often use は just because the predicate is negative. So, although it depends on usages, there's ...


2

If the subject was included, would the phrase look like "葉が秋は赤いです"? It depends on what you want to focus, but if I had to naturally add the subject in this context, I'd make it topic: この葉は秋は赤いです。 Don't worry, は can be used as many times as needed in a sentence whenever the context fits, for example: このビルは南側は11月はストーブをつけるほどは寒くはならないです。 is ...


2

In this context, saying 葉が秋は赤いです instead of 秋は赤いです is not correct, because the 葉 has been already introduced in the discourse (i.e., it's "the leaf", not "a leaf"). If you really want to say 葉 twice, you can do so using は: (The/This) leaf is red in autumn. この葉は秋には赤いです。 秋には葉は赤いです。 この葉は秋は赤いです。(acceptable but slightly questionable: see ...


2

私には the emphasis is on the "I", suggesting that perhaps some other person may be able, but I am not. Typicaly this is regarding some skill. With が the emphasis would be more neutral, or even focused on the 出来ない. These forms may also be used in a sense like "I could never do that!" again emphasis is up to the speaker.


2

日本は神社が多い。 日本に多い神社があります。 The two are not the same. 日本に多い神社があります is very unnatural(It hardly makes sense). 日本には多くの神社があります is natural. 日本は神社が多い。 日本には多くの神社があります。 are almost the same.


2

A1. You are by yourself and you see a complete stranger buying food and for whatever reason you feel like muttering "That person is buying food over there". zero particle; あの人、あそこで食べ物買ってる (if you don't specify him with あの, it's が; あそこで人が食べ物を買ってる) A2. You are with a friend who also sees the stranger and also doesn't know who the stranger is and ...


1

A proper noun like 浅野君 is usually considered always in the discourse (i.e., there is no "an 浅野君"), but there are times when you have to use が for such a noun. This type of が used in the second sentence is called neutral-description ga. It is used to report something as a newly observed event. What's the difference between wa (は) and ga (が)? ...


1

Disclaimer: I don't think this answer will be helpful for a lot of people, but I wanted to share my perspective on this topic anyways. I think it's probably not that effective to try to explain Japanese using western grammar concepts, but nonetheless, に is often associated with the dative case (because it's used for the recipient of a gift, for example). ...


1

Based on the Weblio entries to these expressions, it seems to me that ほかに can be equated to "besides" and ほかは to "apart from". Moreover the は is putting emphasis on the ほか, putting the focus on the other thing, whereas ほかに sounds a little more casual. Ex.: そのほかにしかたがない。 these is no other way besides this one そのほかはしかたがない。 these is no other ...


1

As in many other situations 'は ha/wa' can denote a special significance this time. For example あした 6 時に起きます。plainly states that the subject of the sentence will wake up at 6 tomorrow. For the other example, きょう は 早く 帰ります。 there is a 'は ha/wa' inserted so it would add a nuance that I am waking up early today AND that this is not common for me to do this, i.e....


1

Daijirin says: と言うのは(連語 ) ①(接続詞的に用いて)原因・理由の説明を導く語。そのわけは。なぜならば。 「私は答えに困った。-、そんな事を考えたこともなかったから」 ②(接続助詞的に用いて)主語を示す。 「話-、そのことですか」 My attempt at translation (not a linguist...) (used like a conjunction) guides the explanation of the cause/origin or a reason. The reason is..., because .... "I was troubled for an answer. Actually, I've never even thought ...


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