16

In this case, が is incorrect because you are conveying a known piece of information. When you describe a known or general fact about a subject (お寺), you have to mark it with は, making it the topic of the sentence. お寺は公園の隣です。 The temple is next to the park. (This is a known fact to you.) 鳥は飛べます。 Birds can fly. (This is a general fact.) Note ...


12

子供の時、よく海で泳ぎました。 子供の時は、よく海で泳ぎました。 You might say the latter to imply... "I used to swim in the sea in my childhood (but now I don't anymore)." Here, the は is functioning as the contrastive particle (対比の「は」). You might also say the latter when responding to a question... "What did you often do in your childhood?" -- "In my childhood, I often ...


7

僕にはな、ちゃんとした名前が... The な is a particle. It's used as a filler here. This person is trying to say something like: 僕には(な)、ちゃんとした名前がある(んだ)。 XXに(は)YYがある means "There's YY in XX" / "XX has YY".


5

It would be best to denote the house as both the location (of the rooms) and the topic of the sentence by using both. 「私{わたし}の家{いえ}には部屋{へや}が三{みっ}つあります。」 In my house [←topic], there are three rooms.' Colloquially: 'There are three rooms in my house.'


5

Assuming you already know the basics, here are the relevant rules you may be missing: が is normally used to mark subjects in subordinate clauses. But は is still used in subordinate clauses when contrastive meaning is important. Both contrastive-は and exhaustive-listing-が "emphasize" something before it, but in different ways. Therefore, 私が死んだら is the ...


4

First of all, I want to make sure that everyone understands that in both: 「~を問{と}わず」 and 「~がどうかは問題なく、どれにも同じことが言える。」, the 「~」 part will always be a noun or noun phrase. Both mean "regardless of (noun)" even though the latter obviously sounds explanatory. Now, let us pick an actual noun to replace the "~" so that things will hopefully become ...


4

Or maybe rain always must be with [ga] and never with [wa]? If you want to simply say "it's raining", you have to use が. But you can use 雨は in the following situations: You really want a contrastive meaning, e.g. 雨は降っているが雪は降っていない. You refer to a certain rainfall episode that has been already brought into the universe of discourse, e.g., 雨は止んでいます ("The rain ...


3

君の出身地にどこがありますか? I'm sorry to say that this sentence (using に) is not grammatically correct. に is a particle that indicates: Direction of movement. Place of existence Destination Result of Change Object of a verb Source (of a verb) Specific time The Japanese equivalent of the English 'per' (as in 'three meals per day') You can read more about the に ...


3

太陽を最後に我々は見たのはいつだ? First of all, this sentence is incorrect. の is a formal noun and 見た modifies の as a relative clause (this construction is also known as a cleft sentence). You basically cannot use は inside a relative clause. The correct sentence is: 太陽を最後に我々が見たのはいつだ? When did we see the sun last time? Does it mean that [wareware] is more ...


3

While I'm not able to pin down your focus in the question, I guess you're having trouble understanding the function of は, in grammar and in mental model. You may have already heard about that は marks topic, which is not on the same level with subject, verb (predicate), or object. What does it actually mean? Think of a theater, where actors play as they ...


3

I believe this usage corresponds to the following definition of 通す/徹す from 大辞林: (とおして…する」の形で)始めから終わりまで休みなしにある動作をする。「全曲を—して聞く」「昼も夜も—して働く」 So ~を通して聞く would basically be "listen to 〜 straight through, from beginning to end."


3

This とは is a simple combination of two independent particles. This と is a particle that marks a comparison target. This は is the topic/contrast marker. As you may know, the topic marker can directly follow から, まで, に, で, etc. How is と used in these sentences? (See the last half of Chocolate's answer) What about this combination of と and や If you haven't ...


3

Let me just explain how your example sentences feel like. Please refer to the previous questions for the generic explanation about those particles. あなたの目はきれいです implies that one's eyes are pretty, but not rest of the their body No, that's not correct. This is usually a plain neutral sentence that just means "(I know) Your eyes are (...


3

When you use a quotative-と, the "quote" will basically be a normal non-polite sentence. That is, you can safely use は inside the quote, and you should not drop だ. Brackets are usually not used in a simple case like this. Therefore, the correct sentence is: 私は彼はいい人だと思う。 The polite version is: 私は彼はいい人だと思います。 As you may already know, 私は is normally ...


3

So, first of all, the sentence (私は)月曜日にいつも兄と一緒に食べます。 is grammatically totally fine and would be comprehended in the context you give. This would probably best structurally translate as "I usually/always eat with my brother on Mondays" However, partly because Japanese is a pronoun-drop language, and partly because of the situation -- where the speaker ...


3

Good question! This question is an actually an entire topic. For example, see this article. So we have four patterns here: (1) 木が浮く (2) 木は浮く (3) 木が浮きやすい (4) 木は浮きやすい The short answer is that they are all correct grammatically. However, they have slightly different nuances. "は" is called the topic particle for good reason; it marks what ...


2

The difference might be in the context. N1はN2が多い sounds like an explanation only for N1, while N1にN2が多い sounds like an explanation compared to several others. この川はマスが多い。 This river has a lot of trout (describing only for this river). この川にマスが多い。 This river has a lot of trout (compared to some other rivers). But は is sometimes used to imply a ...


2

The object of a verb is usually marked with を, but when that object is the topic of the sentence, を will be replaced with は. This is a basic grammatical rule, and it has nothing to do with the usage of 通して itself. See: What is a topic prominent language? In your example, みなさんのパフォーマンス is the topic of the sentence, so it's marked with は even though it's the ...


2

The は in the first sentence is contrastive. It suggests that tomorrow, in particular, there's no class. It could be that tomorrow is a holiday, or in response to someone mentioning tomorrow's class without realizing that tomorrow is Saturday. The second sentence, without the は, is neutral. It simply says there's a festival in Tokyo tomorrow. I don't have ...


2

I think you're parsing the clauses incorrectly. そらして is the te-form of 逸らす (to look away or avoid/change topics) て-form + は is a conjunction that often means "if/when" but in this case it indicates the repeated actions of 未来の解像度下げ, 目をそらす, and なりたいものなんて無いと嘯(うそぶ)いた. なりたい is part of the next clause なりたいものなんて無いと嘯(うそぶ)いた日々を. In particular, it modifies もの to ...


2

You are correct in your analysis. The first は establishes the topic as この映画館で ("at this movie theater"). What came prior in the conversation was not talking about この映画館. Then, 水曜日は implies that the price is what it is on Wednesday, as compared to another day / other days when the price is something else (contrastive marker).


2

I think I might know what it means, but I apologize if my explanation is not that good. I believe the verb here is 居る (iru), thus, your sentence would translate like "There's no way that there is a cat (or cats) that sit in such (stiff) manner." いる is not written a lot of times with its kanji so maybe that's why it was not so clear at first. In the sentence,...


2

This may be disappointing to hear, but there's no major difference between 外は寒いので(…) and 外が(…) unless you imagine peculiar situations. (That's why native speakers produced both of those sentences.) Why is that? That's because using vs not using は heavily depends on context. From what I understand, double は is used for comparisons. Where the first は ...


1

「は」 marks topic, while 「に」 marks direction (「海{うみ}に行{い}きます」) or place of existance (「この町{まち}に映画館{えいがかん}がありますか」), and a lot of other things. So 「君の出身地はどこですか」 means "Speaking of your birth place, where is it?", while 「君の出身地にどこですか」I guess sounds something like "About what's in your birthplace, where is it?", if anything at all, which doesn't really means ...


1

Those two は do stress that "at this particular movie theater" and "on Wednesday" (not other days) you can watch movie for 1000 yen. That's it.


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