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1 vote
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(~ての + Noun) vs. (Attributive + Noun)

I don't think they are particularly comparable, but as put in the comment, using a relative clause sounds neutrally explaining the noun (起用) whereas ての implies the 'condition'. "昭和な顔”を買われる起用 is ...
sundowner's user avatar
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0 votes

Is it possible to use のが twice in a sentence?

Rather than cascading のが onto the same clause, we can think about relativizing two clauses, each of which have a が subject marker: AがBがC, such that both of the が are applied to some verb phrase ...
Kaz's user avatar
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3 votes

Is it possible to use のが twice in a sentence?

It is possible, but "I enjoy learning about Japan." is 私は日本について学ぶのがするのが楽しいです It has really nothing to do with using のが twice. As pointed out in the comment, 学ぶ is a verb, which is ...
sundowner's user avatar
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-1 votes

Is のは used to refer to people?

“〜の” should really be construed to be as wide as possiblein terms of what it can stand for. One can I suppose see the “〜の” as to be able to stand in place for about any noun and simply functions to ...
Zorf's user avatar
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0 votes

Is のは used to refer to people?

I parse this as a sort of eel sentence. 指導する to instruct (do instruction) 指導するの act of instruction 指導するのは as for the instruction, 「〇〇が」Aさんです [...] is A-san. Context suggests that the missing が-marked ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
5 votes

Is のは used to refer to people?

This type of sentence is known as a cleft sentence. While this の is technically a sort of a relative clause, it works more as a placeholder. You should recognize this as a special construction, and ...
naruto's user avatar
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1 vote

Understanding 「ついての,。。。」

The comma doesn't affect the grammar. It's the same as #4. I can understand why you might think につく would suffice, but I guess について is too fixed. There are other particles that can be combined with の, ...
Axe's user avatar
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