43

In your example, 日本人の知らない is a relative clause, equivalent in meaning to 日本人が知らない. This clause as a whole modifies 日本語, so it means the Japanese that Japanese people don't know. In relative clauses, the subject particle が can be replaced with の: ジョンが買った本 ジョンの買った本 The book John bought This is true in double-subject constructions as well: ...


41

のだ (んだ, のです, んです, or の) seems to create an information deficit. There was an article written by Derek Schaab about this. The の here is called a formal noun. It is very often translated to "It is that~", "the case", "the situation" or "the fact". When used to end a sentence, it may imply that it is an explanation to some previous context (filling up the ...


29

I think the confusion here arises from the fact that English can use the "-ing" form of a verb in two different ways: using a verb as a noun (gerund), or expressing a continuous action (progressive tense). In plain language, adding の to a verb in Japanese transforms it into a noun and makes it suitable to be followed by は, が, or various other particles that ...


28

I think that in some cases, ending a question in の is fine for male speakers. For example, I hear え~、そうなの? quite often from male speakers. I think, in general, we have that (all male speech) rhetorical questions are allowed to end in の, e.g. even if it is clear what the other person is doing, you may ask 何をしてるの? or 何してんの? What (the heck) are you ...


26

As I understand it, the term “no-adjective” simply means “nouns which are typically translated to adjectives in English and other languages.” If we treat Japanese as a language in its own right, distinguishing them from nouns as different parts-of-speech is completely artificial. The particle の makes a modifier of a noun. The exact relationship between ...


23

Your example is perfectly correct and natural. Using ~の twice in a row is usual. (I am not so sure about particles other than の, but in this answer, I will focus on repetition of の.) How about more repetitions? I agree with Dave M G that, as far as correctness is concerned, you can use as many ~の as you like. However, if a sentence uses ~の many times in ...


18

It's just standard GA-NO conversion. [日本人が知らない]日本語 'Japanese that [Japanese don't know]'


16

As you said, コンニャロー is abbreviated この野郎, which means “you bastard.” バーロー is abbreviation of ばか野郎, “you fool” or something. In this case, probably neither of them is directed to any specific person, but both are used just as general phrases for expressing frustration or anger. Other parts do not have any meaning. Huh? Well, バーロー岬 is a pun of バーロー and ...


13

This の signifies the two words refer to the same thing, and 相手の日本人 means someone who is 相手 and 日本人 at the same time. I do not think that using 日本人の相手 when you mean 相手の日本人 is incorrect. However, 日本人の相手 is ambiguous: it may mean the same as 相手の日本人, but it may also mean an opponent/partner/company of some Japanese person, as in 吉田さんの相手. This is probably why ...


13

From John Hinds' Japanese: Descriptive Grammar, p.16: Nonpolite questions ending in の are frequently termed "feminine" or "childish" sounding, since women and children use this construction. There are, as far as I know, no statistics on this, so I must simply point out that males may also use this construction with impunity. [emphasis added] He gives a ...


13

To answer your question, let's forget about も for a while. も is a particle that can replace は, and this question is actually more about the usage of は. Consider the following conversations: A: Bさんのせんこうはなんですか。 B: コンピューターかがくです。 A: わたしはロボットこうがくです。 As for me, (it's) robotics. (× I am robotics.) A: Bさんのめんせつはいつですか。 When is your (job) interview? ...


12

Chakoshi to the rescue! (Chakoshi is a tool for searching both the Aozora and conversational Japanese corpora at Nagoya University.) A quick search for a "[noun]ん[noun]" pattern in the conversational corpus gives 262 results, most of which are what you are asking about. Broken down, there's actually not much variety in the nouns that follow ん: とき (99): ...


12

I think the difference is somehow similar to that between ice cream and iced cream, or popcorn and popped corn. When you combine two nouns directly, it becomes one fixed idea. 日本料理 is the name of traditionally recognized Japanese local cuisine, in the same way French cuisine, Chinese cuisine or Turkish cuisine are. It includes sushi, soba, tempura etc. ...


12

I think you probably meant to write: 私は日本語が悪いです。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is bad.) 私の日本語は悪いです。(Lit. My Japanese is bad.) The word 悪い is a literal translation of the English 'bad'. In Japanese, you don't use 悪い to say you're not good at something. Instead, I recommend saying: 私は日本語が[下手]{へた}です。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is poor/unskillful.) 私は日本語が[上手]...


12

The particle の does not only indicate possession, but also means a variety of other things such as hierarchical role, or in this instance, physical location. Here's the dictionary definition: ㋒所在。…にある。…にいる。「大阪―友人」 ("My friend in Osaka") So, 不思議の国のアリス does translate to "Alice in the country of wonders." It does not mean that Alice lives there but that she ...


11

より, when preceding an adjective as in your examples, means "more" or "-er": より多くの more [numerous] より快適な more pleasant, smoother より長い longer より良い better より一般的な more common, more typical As such, でより and でのより should not be considered together. で and での go with the preceding word, and より goes with the succeeding word.


11

I suspect it's the nominalizer の, making the noun phrase "...温めるの". Then the 'directional/intention' particle に is appended, giving intention towards which the 電子レンジ can be considered 重宝. This can be occasionally tricky to sort out from the "in spite of" usage, but it is an alternate parse to be aware of.


11

のに can have several meanings, "despite" being the most common one. But it can also mean "in order to" (~のため). Here are some examples (taken from here): パスポートは海外旅行に行くのに必要です。 A passport is necessary to travel abroad. 電子レンジは冷めた料理を温めるのに重宝だ。 A microwave is handy to heat up cold food.


11

~んです is a contraction of ~のです, which in turn is the polite form of the plain/informal ~のだ (which is also seen sometimes as ~んだ.) ~のです/~のだ are used to emphasize the previous statement. According to Daijisen and Daijirin, のです emphasizes explanations of cause/reason/basis etc. In the forms of ~んですか/~のですか, it can create an emphasized or even demanding question. ...


11

When a verb is directly marked by だろう/でしょう, there are three meanings: 行くだろう "It will (probably) go." (downwards tone throughout) "It's going, isn't it?" (upwards during 行く, then downstep) "I wonder if it will go." (neutral tone throughout) While if it's marked by (ん/の)+(だろう/でしょう), it's like before, but the first option is strengthened a little: ...


11

「でんでんむしは おともだちの でんでんむしの ところに やっていきました。」 The first の is appositive and the second の is possessive. 「おともだちのでんでんむし」 means "(his) snail friend" = "his friend who is also a snail". In meaning 「おともだちのでんでんむし」=「でんでんむしのおともだち」. Why so? Because the 「の」 is appositive. The おともだち is a でんでんむし. "The snail went to his/her snail friend's place/home." If there were ...


10

I interpret it as that being the "kind" of fondness this person has. It might make more sense if you put quotes around it or add という. 「お嫁さんにしたい」の好き お嫁さんにしたいという好き お嫁さんにしたい is being used as a phrase to describe what kind of 好き it is but not in a way that follows the normal rules of grammar, or to put it more precisely, not in a way that follows how you ...


10

I think #2 and #3 are ungrammatical. I think #1 is grammatical, but I would probably say more like... 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}ときの{規則/決まり/ルール}」 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}際の{規則/決まり/ルール}」 or more simply (and probably more commonly)... 「ゴミ出しのルール」 To use the nominalizer こと, you would sound more natural if you said: 「ごみを捨てること{についての or に関する}{規則/決まり/ルール}」 but this might be ...


10

It is all about grammar and nothing else. 「(Number) + も」 functions adverbially to modify a verb. 「(Number) + も + の」 functions adjectivally to modify a noun. Let us look at your example sentences: 「彼{かれ}は何十冊{なんじゅっさつ}もの日本{にほん}に関{かん}する本{ほん}を持{も}っている。」 「何十冊もの」 modifies the noun 「本」. 「高速道路{こうそくどうろ}は何千{なんぜん}もの車{くるま}で渋滞{じゅうたい}した。」 「何千もの」 ...


9

In this case, 「の」 changes the verb "to [be] see" into the gerund form "[be] seeing", which is what you found interesting. After that, 「は」 is just 「は」.


9

One way is to look at them as exclusive (ほかの) and inclusive (ほかに). だれかほかの人に聞いてごらん Ask somebody else [someone other than me/someone other than this person] for help. ほかに行きたい人はいますか [In addition to who already wants to go] is there anyone else who wants to go? Notice that you can use "besides" in both sentences: 1. Ask someone besides me. 2. ...


9

As for your last question, please read this question and answer first: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? This question is about two-kanji compounds (熟語 in the narrow sense), but the answer there is basically true for many cases involving four kanji or more. In fact, most of the "四字熟語" you encounter, like 火力発電 or 愛国精神, are established set phrases, ...


9

The difference is that での shows the relationship to a following noun, just as the page says. 日本での研究 forms a single noun phrase ("research in Japan"), and this noun phrase as a whole is marked as a topic with は. In the other example, 大学院で isn't part of a noun phrase. Instead, it modifies the following predicate, (医学の研究を)する ("do medical research"). So it's ...


9

As stated in the comment section and in the other answer, ヌルヌル means "slimy", "slippery" and hard to grab hold of. ビクビク often means "to feel scared", but here in your example it has nothing to do with "feeling scared". 明鏡国語辞典 explains びくびく as follows: びくびく〘副詞〙 ❶ 恐怖・不安に敏感になっておびえるさま。 ❷ 体などが何度もふるえ動くさま。 We use ビクビク, ビクッ, or ビクン to describe a sudden and ...


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