19

I think the difference is somehow similar to that between ice cream and iced cream, or popcorn and popped corn. When you combine two nouns directly, it becomes one fixed idea. 日本料理 is the name of traditionally recognized Japanese local cuisine, in the same way French cuisine, Chinese cuisine or Turkish cuisine are. It includes sushi, soba, tempura etc. ...


13

When a verb is directly marked by だろう/でしょう, there are three meanings: 行くだろう "It will (probably) go." (downwards tone throughout) "It's going, isn't it?" (upwards during 行く, then downstep) "I wonder if it will go." (neutral tone throughout) While if it's marked by (ん/の)+(だろう/でしょう), it's like before, but the first option is strengthened a little: ...


13

「でんでんむしは おともだちの でんでんむしの ところに やってきました。」 The first の is appositive and the second の is possessive. 「おともだちのでんでんむし」 means "(his) snail friend" = "his friend who is also a snail". In meaning, 「おともだちのでんでんむし」=「でんでんむしのおともだち」. Why so? Because the 「の」 is appositive. The おともだち is a でんでんむし. In an appositive 「AのB」, A = B and B = A. "The snail ...


12

The particle の does not only indicate possession, but also means a variety of other things such as hierarchical role, or in this instance, physical location. Here's the dictionary definition: ㋒所在。…にある。…にいる。「大阪―友人」 ("My friend in Osaka") So, 不思議の国のアリス does translate to "Alice in the country of wonders." It does not mean that Alice lives there but that she ...


12

To answer your question, let's forget about も for a while. も is a particle that can replace は, and this question is actually more about the usage of は. Consider the following conversations: A: Bさんのせんこうはなんですか。 B: コンピューターかがくです。 A: わたしはロボットこうがくです。 As for me, (it's) robotics. (× I am robotics.) A: Bさんのめんせつはいつですか。 When is your (job) interview? ...


12

XXってののYY means XXというもののYY. The first の is a 形式名詞(formal noun). ~っての is a colloquial way of saying 「~というもの」(「と言う物」 in kanji). (って is a colloquial version of という.) The second の is a case particle, closest to "of". 「この中で誰が一人ですか?」ってのの一斉調査 →「この中で誰が一人ですか?」というものの一斉調査


11

I think you probably meant to write: 私は日本語が悪いです。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is bad.) 私の日本語は悪いです。(Lit. My Japanese is bad.) The word 悪い is a literal translation of the English 'bad'. In Japanese, you don't use 悪い to say you're not good at something. Instead, I recommend saying: 私は日本語が[下手]{へた}です。(Lit. As for me, Japanese is poor/unskillful.) 私は日本語が[上手]...


10

As for your last question, please read this question and answer first: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? This question is about two-kanji compounds (熟語 in the narrow sense), but the answer there is basically true for many cases involving four kanji or more. In fact, most of the "四字熟語" you encounter, like 火力発電 or 愛国精神, are established set phrases, ...


10

I interpret it as that being the "kind" of fondness this person has. It might make more sense if you put quotes around it or add という. 「お嫁さんにしたい」の好き お嫁さんにしたいという好き お嫁さんにしたい is being used as a phrase to describe what kind of 好き it is but not in a way that follows the normal rules of grammar, or to put it more precisely, not in a way that follows how you ...


10

It is all about grammar and nothing else. 「(Number) + も」 functions adverbially to modify a verb. 「(Number) + も + の」 functions adjectivally to modify a noun. Let us look at your example sentences: 「彼{かれ}は何十冊{なんじゅっさつ}もの日本{にほん}に関{かん}する本{ほん}を持{も}っている。」 「何十冊もの」 modifies the noun 「本」. 「高速道路{こうそくどうろ}は何千{なんぜん}もの車{くるま}で渋滞{じゅうたい}した。」 「何千もの」 modifies the noun 「車」....


9

どっか is the short spoken form of どこか which means somewhere. There is also an entry here: http://jisho.org/word/%E4%BD%95%E5%87%A6%E3%81%8B


9

I think #2 and #3 are ungrammatical. I think #1 is grammatical, but I would probably say more like... 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}ときの{規則/決まり/ルール}」 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}際の{規則/決まり/ルール}」 or more simply (and probably more commonly)... 「ゴミ出しのルール」 To use the nominalizer こと, you would sound more natural if you said: 「ごみを捨てること{についての or に関する}{規則/決まり/ルール}」 but this might be ...


9

An interesting question. It's actually a peculiar feature of the word 先生. It may sound confusing, but 先生 does not literally mean "teacher" even though it is the most basic word for it today. It is an honorific title addressing a learned person, like "sir", "master", "honorable" etc. 2 教師・師匠・医師・代議士など学識のある人や指導的立場にある人を敬っていう語。呼びかけるときなどに代名詞的に、...


9

「高層{こうそう}ビルに何車線{なんしゃせん}もの道路{どうろ}。」 You clearly are unfamiliar with this use of 「に」. You are thinking of "at", "in", etc., which is why this phrase makes no sense to you. This phrase makes perfect sense and it is very natural-sounding. 「に」 here means "and", "in addition to", etc. That usage can be found even in Jisho. See definition #8 in: https://jisho....


8

One usage that I was taught and is not mentioned above for んです is to soften a question or statement. For example レストランに 行きたいです I want to go to a restaurant. is a bit demanding or matter-of-fact. Changing to 行きたいんです softens this. Imagine a friend asks you about what you both should do for lunch. 行きたい sounds a bit forceful, like you will consider nothing ...


8

First of all, the meaning is the same. 'questioning the former.' なぜ彼がそんなことをやったか、わかりません。 なぜ彼がそんなことをやったのか、わかりません。 どうして彼女がそんなつまらない本を読んでいるか、不思議です。 どうして彼女がそんなつまらない本を読んでいるのか、不思議です。 are all natural. のか This is a combination of の and か. This の is called 準体言助詞, which makes a noun phrase out of a verb phrase. 「それを食べたのは、いけないことだ。」(It is bad that you ate it.) Also, you ...


8

を is always an object marker in modern Japanese. It never replaces personal pronouns. Where did you see such a rule? noun + を at the end of a sentence is a fairly common device found in lyrics, slogans, posters and such. In general, it often means "I/We want/need ~" or "Give ~". 彼女にお茶を。 (lit. "(we need) Tea to her") Serve her a cup of tea. 犯罪者に死を! ...


8

As stated in the comment section and in the other answer, ヌルヌル means "slimy", "slippery" and hard to grab hold of. ビクビク often means "to feel scared", but here in your example it has nothing to do with "feeling scared". 明鏡国語辞典 explains びくびく as follows: びくびく〘副詞〙 ❶ 恐怖・不安に敏感になっておびえるさま。 ❷ 体などが何度もふるえ動くさま。 We use ビクビク, ビクッ, or ビクン to describe a sudden and ...


8

The の is an appositive (同格) particle. もう1つの大きな政党の共和党からは... You could rephrase it as もう1つの大きな政党である共和党からは... "From the other major political party, (that is,) the Republican Party, ..." "From the Republican Party, (which is) the other major political party, ..." Examples: 友達の山田くん (my friend Yamada-kun) のねずみのぐりとぐら (field mice Guri and Gura) 被害者の男性 ...


8

「自分{じぶん}がどんな人{ひと}であるかを知{し}ってもらいたい。」 ("I want you/them/people, etc. to know what kind of person I am.") This is a completely grammatical and natural-sounding sentence, including the use of 「を」. Why can を act on a particle? I understand のか, なんか as they are compound words which can be treated as nouns, i.e direct objects by を (or so I believe), but why here?...


8

「ドアの所{ところ}にかさを立{た}てておきます。」 You have pretty much answered your own question. 「~~の所」 means the same thing as 「~~のすぐ近{ちか}く」 or 「~~のそば」, which would be "in close proximity to ~~" in English. This 「ところ」 is used heavily by the native speakers, so you will keep encountering it. Not that you would need to know at this stage, but we often pronounce 「~~のところ」 as 「~~...


8

小山さんは山下さんの右にいます is indeed ambiguous when the speaker is facing them. In a situation like this, you should explicitly specify the point of view like so: 小山さんは山下さんから見て右にいます。 小山さんは{私/ここ/こちら/鈴木さん/皆さん/etc}から見て山下さんの右にいます。 小山さんは山下さんの向かって右にいます。 向かって右/左 is a handy expression that fixates the POV to the listener (i.e., "your right/left", but the POV can be ...


7

If I'm not mistaken, I think there are two acceptable ways to say this in English, too: そのうちの一つの箱は私のです。 One box among those is mine. (more literally) Among those, one box is mine. その箱のうちの一つは私のです。 One of those boxes is mine. It's true the former looks slightly less-organized, but the nuance is fairly small in spoken language.


7

You seem to be a native English speaker, so try thinking about it this way. The sentence could be roughly translated as follows. I like looking at drawings. However, could you say the following? I like look at drawings. No. That is not valid English because you can only like a noun. "looking" is a noun that represents an action. Similarly, えをみる is ...


7

There may be certain dialects where it is otherwise, but ~ているの, in the most colloquial standard Japanese, contracts to ~てんの, not simply ~てん, on its own. Before certain だ it can contract a little further: in colloquial speech, 何をしているのだ can appear as 何してんだ. That may be the source of your confusion. I guarantee you, you will never hear 伸ばしてのか? People simply do ...


7

As you suggested, "Fの復活" would be far more straightforward and simply means "The Return of F", but "復活のF" is not a typo, of course. In "復活のF", the main noun is "F", and 復活の is a phrase that modifies "F". Think of it as something like "F, The Resurrected" or "Returning F". Basically you can re-analyze this title as "復活するF" or "復活したF", as if the modifying ...


7

A + の + B can mean not only "B of A" but also "B as A" or "B that is A". See: What's the difference between 日本人の学生 and 日本の学生 ? In English, one can say "You liar!", "You bastard!" and so on, instead of saying "You are a liar." In Japanese, "にいにいのオニ!", "お母さんの嘘つき!", and such work exactly like these — to abuse someone — except that the second ...


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