8

It's basically the same as (imperative +) よ, i.e. request when the listener doesn't seem to share the same recognition as the speaker when you doubt that the opponent does it. In falling tone*1, it stands for complaint as well as よ, and extra ね softens it, sort of. (*1 Edit: I wrote "falling tone" because of similarity to falling よ, but I should have ...


6

This 興味深いわね is just "That's interesting" or more specifically, "This '意識思考そのものが自律して...' is an interesting assumption." わね is a feminine sentence-end particle which does not necessarily have to be translated, but it's for seeking agreement; "huh?" or "isn't it?" 興味深い never means someone is interested. For example, 彼は興味深い always means "He is an interesting ...


6

Elongated ねー (pronounced "neeh" rather than "knee") is simply a word of agreement, "Yeah." or "You can say that." It's relatively mild or feminine. そうだね can mean the same thing, but it often means something slightly different, "That's right" or "That's correct."


5

This is an ending theme from anime 怪傑ゾロリ, and ゾロリ's mama has already been dead for years when the story begins, so... The の is #❷-1 in デジタル大辞泉: [終助]活用語の連体形に付く。 1 (下降調のイントネーションを伴って)断定の言い方を和らげる意を表す。多く、女性が使用する。 It's a sentence-ending particle. (With a falling tone) You use it to soften an assertive statement. It's more used by women. So ゾロリ's late ...


5

Ignore my suggestion in the comments! Actually I think the way you should interpret this is "what difference does it make if he's riding the train?" Grammatically some key points are: 乗ってたら is a contraction is 乗っていたら, which is a condition of 乗っている ("is riding") なんだっていうんだ is kind of a set expression for "what difference does it make?" それがどうした is another ...


4

Given the limited context, there's only so much room for interpretation, but assuming that this is only a fragment of the conversation, this can be an acceptable answer. そうですね is a way to say, that is so or right, but there are also cases where it is used as the speaker is gathering their thoughts about the matter. While not expressly stated in most ...


4

This sounds like it is related to the sentence ending particle ね。This particle, as you probably well know means something like: isn't it, right?!, however sometimes it will be translated into English as an emphasizer, or an explanation point. Examples: そうですね。(You're right! OR That's correct!) 今日あついね。(It's hot today, isn't it?) Don't confuse this with the よ ...


2

What does the long “neeeeee” mean when 2 friends are talking? If the pronunciation is a long "ねー", it means "そうだねー". There are times when you agree with the speaker or sometimes between people who hear what the speaker says. In these times, people who agree with each other will say "ねー" with nodding slowly at the same time with watching each other's eyes ...


2

I dunno exactly, but If you tell me that is "a reply", I suppose that is a short form of そうだね。


2

First, concerning そうね, we have two possible interpretations. One is that it shows your agreement to the opponent. The other is that you are thinking about something and almost have found it right. As for がんばるね, it's a bit difficult to explain but you can think of it as a kind of greeting in wrapping up the conversation. If ね is used in a certain situation,...


2

The particle "de" 「で」 doesn't just mark the location where something happens. It's also used to mark the means by which something happens. Which can include more direct things like "the tool by which an action was performed" (e.g. I went to Tokyo by bullet train - densha de Tokyo ni itta) but can also mark more abstract ideas. So "futari de" 「二人で」 means "by ...


2

そうです is a way of saying 'yes, that is certain.' For example, a discussion using the word might go like this:  4+3=7 ですか? (Is 4+3=7?)  はい、そうです。(Yes, that is certain.) On the other hand, そうですか is, as the definition you provided, can be both I see; or is that so? If you used it as 'I see': 椅子に引っかかって腕を折りました。(I tripped on a chair and broke ...


2

You'll find lots and lots of resources online about how to use ね. However, the short answer to your question is that ね is a discourse marker used to manage the relationship between speaker and listener. If you listen to how people use ね in conversational Japanese, it's used to establish, maintain, and emphasize agreement between participants in the ...


2

…からよ can be interpreted as two usages. One is a sentence ender with だ omitted, in other words, it's interchangeable to …からだよ, albeit it's slang among women in a certain generation or 役割語 for female characters. (静かね is parallel to this.) The other one is filler usage, this time, it's not interchangeable to …からだよ but just added to the sub clause …から, which ...


1

I see translation failed. "yume no naka futari de ita yone" is "Both you and me were in same dream, weren't we". This is included part of yone.


1

ねー is sometimes used as "heeey" like if you're talking to your friend and say something along the lines of "heeey, what's that?" (ねー、なにこれ?) or another example of ねー from the top of my head is when in anime 2 friends are like "something + だよねー!" would be -isn't itttttt? in my opinion it sounds more enthusiastic than just "だよね。" or "isn't it.”


1

「な」and 「ね」 seem to be more rough sound and generally applies to the male gender but is not necessarily restricted to only males. You can think of it as "huh". e.g. 洋介:今、図書館に行くんだよな。 Yousuke: You are going to the library now huh? or ボブ:日本語は、たくさん勉強したけどな。まだ全然わからない。 Bob: I studied Japanese a lot, right? But, I still don't get it at all. In your case, 「...


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