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2

あなたに幸せになってほしい。 This sentence implies encouraging the listener when the speaker will help the partner need to be happy. In a similar way, next sentence is also kind of encouragement. 私はあなたが彼に英語を教えてほしい。 I request/ask you to teach English. This is the mix of emphatic "が" to specify the person and requesting/asking them to. While, 冬が早く来て欲しい。I expect/...


3

The difference might be in the context. N1はN2が多い sounds like an explanation only for N1, while N1にN2が多い sounds like an explanation compared to several others. この川はマスが多い。 This river has a lot of trout (describing only for this river). この川にマスが多い。 This river has a lot of trout (compared to some other rivers). But は is sometimes used to imply a ...


4

No, ためか and ために don't mean the same thing -- just as か and に do not mean the same thing. The か in ためか is the same か used as the verbal question mark. This indicates uncertainty and indefiniteness. (Separately, I'm pretty sure you have a typo, where ささまい should be ささない instead.) If the sentence said あまり日がささないため[に]{●}, that would be a definite reason. ...


4

Without the だけ and だから, you have a long noun phrase, which you could parse... [〈(身の危険が迫った)時に〉発現する]能力 身の危険が迫った modifies 時. [身の危険が迫った]時に = lit. "at times [when physical danger is approaching]" 身の危険が迫った時に発現する modifies 能力. [(身の危険が迫った)時に発現する]能力 = lit. "ability [that appears at times (when physical danger is approaching)] Adding だけ: 「~~時に...」 = ...


0

l'électeur’s answer is substantially correct, but since “In Japan” is setting the context for the rest of the sentence, I'd say にほん で は、 ぼく が… And in fact you could probably leave out ぼく が, and just say にほん で は、 しんかんせん に のりたい です。 since the listener will infer that the subject of のりたい is ぼく.


4

が is emphasizing the noun before it than に. あなたに幸せになってほしい I want you to be happy. あなたが幸せになってほしい I want YOU to be happy. It's not common and must be some important meaning on 'you'. More like dialogue in a movie. Although I feel your second example is simply wrong. In this case we should use に. Even it has to be "you" who teach him English.


22

「にほん で ぼく は しんかんせん を のります。」 is a nice attempt. I would, however, like to address two items here. 「のります」 simply means "will ride". If you want to say "want to ride", you might want to say 「のりたいです」. 「Verb in Continuative Form + たい」 means "to want to [verb]". 「のり」 is the continuative form of 「のる」. The next thing I need to point out is the particle ...


10

逃げられたの 彼氏に!! As you've noticed, this is an inverted word order of: 彼氏に逃げられたの 逃げられた here is Suffering Passive (迷惑の受身), which is a kind of Indirect Passive (間接受身). As you know, in passive sentences the agent (動作主) of the action is marked with に. eg お母さんが私を褒める → 私がお母さんに褒められる. Here the agent of 逃げる is 彼氏, hence: 彼氏が逃げた (active) My boyfriend ran away. → ...


11

まだ固いつぼみを見つけ出して、これにあたたかい春の風を送り、花に育てる The direct object of 育てる is left out. It's これ, i.e. まだ固いつぼみ, "firm buds". It's 「(これ(=まだ固いつぼみ)を)花に育てる」, "bring up (firm buds) into flowers". そこへゆくと、[まだ固いつぼみを見つけ出して、これにあたたかい春の風を送り、花に育てる]編集のしごとはそれ自体が一つの芸術である。 Means something along the lines of... In contrast, the work of editing [where you find firm buds, tend them ...


8

A は B の [割合{わりあい}] を占{し}めている A の B に占める割合は~ B に占める A の割合は~ Before saying anything, I will say that B represents the whole and A represents a part of it. 「割合」 means "percentage". The next thing I am going to say is that all three phrases above are common, grammatical and natural-sounding. Now, moving onto the nitty-gritty.. 「~~を占める」 We ...


2

This is about such a basic grammar point that I am not entirely sure if I am reading your question correctly. 「私が/はした」 = "I did something." 「私にした」 = "Someone did something to/for me" The two phrases above mean completely different things from each other. In the second, the subject is unmentioned. The particles, the shortest- and simplest-looking ...


0

It means that’s probably because he/she/they/you did such a thing to me. It may be like he/she/they/you told a lie to “me” or ignored “me” and after that he/she/they/you felt sorry or another person hated him/her/them/you. But I know this doesn’t suit the context. At least, 病に倒れる and 〜にすれば have nothing to do with this sentence.


1

I believe you are wondering if the use of に in the first sentence is correct because the second sentence is not using に in a sentence that seems similar to the first one. First of all, these two sentences are both correct. Only the difference is that the first one is written in hiragana only, and the second one is written with some kanji. たくさん[人参]{にんじん}...


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