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あれは魔術師に与えられた祝福(だ) is ambiguous. That is a blessing given to a sorcerer. (the same as あれは魔術師へ与えられた祝福だ, which is unambiguous) That is a blessing given by a sorcerer. (the same as あれは魔術師{から/より}与えられた祝福だ, which is unambiguous) (Replace "blessing" to "blessed item" if you like.) In this case, both seem equally possible, so you have to decide the more plausible ...


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I am almost positive the sentence means "That is a blessing, bestowed by a sorcerer." The 魔術師に与えられた expands the word "祝福". The sentence could just be あれは祝福 - "that is a blessing", but there is extra information in that it was bestowed by a sorcerer, the 与えられる is passive form of 与える.


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I agree with the other translator. What you are missing is that “られ” after the verb indicates passive voice, so the verb is acting on the sorcerer. I like this source that goes over a lot of the verb endings. https://nihongoperapera.com/dirty-japanese-guide-ru-verbs.html


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昨日{きのう}私{わたし}も分{わ}からなかったから、先生{せんせい}に聞{き}きました。 You're right that this particular に (ni) is the indirect object marker. 聞く (kiku) is a transitive verb which means "to ask" in this context. The object it takes is the thing that is asked rather than the person being asked, so it can take both に (ni) and を (wo) at the same time e.g. 先生に質問を聞きました sensei ni ...


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Too long for a comment so I write it as an "answer". As you said, に can be used as an indirect object marker. For example: I write an email to my colleague. email is the direct object colleague is the indirect object (私は)同僚にメールを書く。 As far as I know there are some "special words", which call for に as a particle. ...聞く (to ask) or ...会う (to meet) [Perhaps ...


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(I know this is frowned upon, but given the comments I've received from the original poster, I've reworked my answer.) To me, replacing both of these "に" with "で" sounds off. As far as I've heard, "に" is usually taught as indicating the location at which something exists or the direction something moves in / its destination, and that you should use で for ...


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A good question. Actually the answer is, we never say 彼が悪いヤツに思う though we do say 彼が悪いヤツに思える. The construction rightly means "he seems a bad guy". 思える in this sentence is not the potential form of 思う, confusingly, it is another verb that describes perceptory appearance. Similarly, 彼が悪いヤツに見える He looks like a bad guy 彼が悪いヤツに聞こえる It sounds like he is a ...


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[person] + に(は)~がある/いる is a very common pattern that can be translated to "[person] has ~", but this is safely used only with certain type of objects. ability, trait, idea, right or other invisible/abstract things 私には夢がある。 I have a dream. 彼女には才能がある。 She has a talent. 彼には欠点がある。 He has a (certain) fault. 我々には投票する権利がある。 We have rights to vote. ...


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