New answers tagged

3

「顔{かお}はやや仰向{あおむ}きがち に、天{てん}の栄光{えいこう}をながめやる 目{め}が、深{ふか}くやすらか にみひらかれて いた。」 You ask: Verbs suffixed by がち and then followed by に may function as an adverb, but then how does it relate with 顔, which is is followed は? 「仰向き」 is a noun here, not a verb. 「がち」 can be preceded by either the 連用形 of a verb or a noun. 「顔はやや仰向きがちに」 adverbially modifies the ...


3

First of all, please keep in mind that the entire lyrics are made of sarcasm rather than pun. Everything in the brackets is what this "Mona Lisa The Otsubone" says. They are superficially compliments but are actually complaints. (In case you've missed the implication of お局, please read the link.) A song full of black jokes like this is certainly not a "kid's ...


4

When you see a father and a son together no one would ever say to the father "you look just like your son", but it would be perfectly natural to say "your son looks just like you". In this example the father is the 'standard of comparison', so if you are going to use に it should be attached only to the father. と treats both parties equally, so you can add ...


4

ずに is a conjunctive negative form for verbs which comes from the classical Japanese auxiliary verb ず (which is still used in limited occasions in modern Japanese). This ず was/is added to the end of the 未然形 of a verb and is the 基本形 (and 終止形 and 連用形) of the old negative 'tense'. There are plenty of websites dealing with this, so have a look if you're ...


7

「そりゃあ持{も}っているでしょうに。」 For the majority of native speakers, this is not a regular, "calm/relaxed" way to say: "(Yes,) I have (a) credit card(s)." That is why I asked above how exactly you asked your question that triggered the use of the highly nuanced and possibly emotional に-ending. My first impression when I read this question before the edit was ...


Top 50 recent answers are included