14

The quoting particle と (or って) is tenseless, just as the quotation marks " for direct speech (she said "I want to sing"), or that for indirect speech (she said that she wanted to sing) are tenseless. The tense is reflected in the verb that is used with the quoting particle, e.g. ~といいました ~といった ~といっています In your example sentence, the correct tense for ...


13

This type of って is mainly used to repeat one's opinion, like "I'm saying ~" or "I told you, ~". So it's still quotative in a sense; the speaker is quoting their own previous statement. For example, depending on the context, 「寝ろって。」 can mean either "[Someone] told you to sleep" (quote from a third speaker) or "I told you, go to bed!". But って also often used ...


11

That would be one fish tank and two trophies, all of which are placed on top of something (その上). At least, that is how nearly every native speaker would read that sentence. If it were the word 「ふたつ」 that was confusing you, it would not be used to count two totally unrelated items such as a fish tank and a trophy when there is one of each. It is not like ...


7

に has a lot of functions and I won't go into detail of every possible usage of it. Let me just comment on your examples. 友達に晩ご飯を食べました is ungrammatical and makes no sense. 友達と晩ご飯をたべました means "I ate dinner with my friend." 彼氏にキスした means "I kissed my boyfriend." This に is a target/destination marker. (キスする is an intransitive verb.) 彼氏とキスした is similar, but it ...


6

Yes these are different. There are (at least) three ways of using number + counter + と, and they have different nuances. concrete number + counter + と + adjective This is for showing a concrete figure before using an adjective like 大きい/短い/重い. Probably this is a kind of quotative-と. The number/amount can be big, small, or neither. ...


6

私は先生と話す means "I and the teacher have a conversation", so they talk to each other". 私は先生に話す means "I tell something to the teacher", so only I speak and the teacher listens to it.


5

この[カメラ]{かめら}と[テレビ]{てれび}と[ラジオ]{らじお}(を)ください。 would sound okay when talking to a store clerk while shopping. 「AとBとC」 sounds a tiny bit more casual/conversational than 「A、BとC」「A、B、C」. You can say/write... [趣味]{しゅみ}は[ピアノ]{ぴあの}、[読書]{どくしょ}と[映画鑑賞]{えいがかんしょう}です。 My hobbies are playing piano, reading, and watching movies. [首相]{しゅしょう}は、[スペイン]{すぺいん}、[フランス]{ふらんす}、...


5

It's quotative-と, but used after the corresponding verb because the quoted part was added as an afterthought. You can rephrase them like: 先生は「すべての悩みは対人関係の悩みである。裏を返せば、われわれの幸福もまた、対人関係のなかにあるのだ。」とおっしゃる。 しかし、『私は、それでいいのだろうか、「た」は過去なのだろうか』、という疑問を持っています。 The comma before と is technically optional. But an author often does this intentionally to make the text ...


5

In this case と is the quotative particle. It indicates what the person will write. 一本の鉛筆が あれば 戦争はいやだと 私は書く If I had a pencil I would write that war is horrible. Compare this with 手紙を書く. This means "I will write a letter", but と would be used to mark what you actually write in the letter. This と particle is used with verbs such as 言う, 思う etc. to mark ...


5

Now probably you are confused by the series of non-obvious idiomatic expressions. A more literal translation would be: 地上なら、[[何十キロと][遠くまで]達する]音だ。 It is a sound that [should reach [to a distance], [by tens of kilometers]] if on the ground. So yours is correct as a whole too, but there is no connection between 何十キロと and 遠くまで, as both are independent ...


5

と connects 不安 and 病名がちゃんとあったことに少し安心. It is a little off grammatically, but that's not too much of a surprise given that this is a tweet. Perhaps more proper way of saying this would be 不安と、病名がちゃんとあったことへの少しの安心とで、涙が止まらない As for your question about 少し, if you read it like "a little bit of relief" resulted in tears streaming, that might come off as odd, but if ...


5

でも男のことになると、どうにも弱いとこがあってさ… The と is a conjunctive particle (接続助詞) meaning "When" or "If". It's the と in your second example: と can be used to imply an inevitable outcome, eg. 六時になると、太陽が見える that is not something you can "become"... The subject of the なる is not the speaker, but more like "things" or "topic". As the other poster says, 「~(こと)となると、」 or 「~(...


4

This と means "with". In the case of the verb けっこんする it is used to mark the person you are marrying. Xとけっこんする = "I will marry with X" = "I will marry X. You'll see と meaning "with" in quite a few places. Some other examples would be: Xと会う = meet with X. AとBを比べる = compare B with A. Your understanding of the rest of the sentence looks good.


4

と has a lot of uses. As far as I know, と can be uses to point to: a member of a complete list (X と Y と Z => noun X AND noun Y AND noun Z) a cause of a natural consequence (condition A と natural consequence B => ALWAYS WHEN condition A THEN consequence B) a partner also doing the action (person A と action Z => to do action Z TOGETHER WITH person A) with ...


4

「と」 is used mostly for conditionals where the consequence is an expected one. For example: 雨が降ると道路が濡れます。 (The road gets wet when it rains.) But what you want to say carries an intention, and also, there is only one outcome, meaning that if it rains you won't go to the park and you won't go somewhere else. So I'd use 「たら」: 明日雨が降ったら、公園に行きません。(If it ...


4

I think you are misunderstanding 思う means, it doesn't apply here. 思う is when you think (you are not certain if is a fact or not, you think it may be true). So there is no (I thought that) in this sentence. It is a fact that how the speaker felt and the speaker realized the fact the children grown up so quickly. 少{すこ}し寂{さび}しい気持{きも}ちにもなった is also a fact ...


4

is it possible to write this? Is this sentence grammatically correct? Yes. if so, is there any difference between the first sentence and this one? I feel like writing "私と友達は..." emphasize more about the subject (me and my friend) than "私は友達と..." (me with my friend) In 私は友達と…, the 私 is the topic, in other words, the sentences around it are saying ...


4

When かんかん means "furious(ly)", 明鏡国語辞典 defines it as "an adverb that takes に", デジタル大辞泉 defines it as a na-adjective, and 大辞林 defines it as an adverb. Indeed it's confusing, but at least to me, かんかん in this sense is a no-adjective, which means I feel only Sentence A is correct. You can use it as a predicate. 彼女はかんかんに怒っている。 今、彼女はかんかんだ。 ...


4

「~と[化]{か}する」 means "change~~" "turn into~~". The と has almost the same function as 「に」 in 「~に変わる」 or 「~になる」. (For the difference of 「~になる」 and 「~となる」, see this thread: What is the difference between 〜となる and 〜になる? しかし[(今の俺には)無用の長物と化した]それ 今の俺には literally means "for the current me" "for what I am now" (≂ 今の俺にとっては). 今の俺には無用の長物と化した is a relative clause ...


4

This と before 続く is a "friend" of quotative-と. If I have to choose one, it corresponds to this definition of デジタル大辞泉. (文や句をそのまま受けて)動作・作用・状態の内容を表す。引用の「と」。 It says と can broadly mark "the content of an action/effect/state". The well-known quotative-と is actually a subset of this type of と. I don't know how this is usually taught to Japanese learners, ...


4

というの asks rhetorical questions (it's literally just と, 言う, and の). If your mom told you to keep studying for a long time you might say something like 死ぬまで勉強しろというのか "you want me to study until I die, is that it?!" Or, more literally "are you telling (言う) me to study until I die?!" As you can see it's a bit difficult to line up the tenses between the two ...


4

Yes, the order matters. Since things before the と will be treated as a part of the quote, お前とはもう別れたいまでと言われた sounds like he actually said "別れたいまで", which makes no sense in this context. It's somewhat like "He even said that ~" vs "He said that even ~". In general, when two particles are combined, the order is almost always important (e.g., you can say 学校では ...


4

I feel this is a difficult question even to some native speakers... The meaning of the first sentence is "No matter what you are going to find (e.g., in this dungeon), it must be something incredibly dangerous." For this ようと, see: What are the grammar rules behind this clause, 「才能があろうがなかろうが」? and Meaning of volitional passive form So, you are supposed to ...


4

This と simply marks quoted speech like the speech marks "" in English. The difference is that in English we only ever use "" for direct quotes e.g. He said "I'm going to Japan". but we don't use "" for indirect quotes e.g. He said he was going to Japan. However, in Japanese と would be required for both of these. 彼は「日本に行く」と言った。 彼は日本に行くと言った。 と思う ...


4

Have you learned about quotative-と, which is typically used with 思う, 考える, etc? This と is not "when/if", but quotative. That is, 街灯じゃ暗い is what the crow "said" or "thought" (of course it's a personification). 街灯じゃ暗いと カラスが頭上で笑った A crow laughed, (as if saying) "Street lights are dark!" 笑った is just the past tense of 笑う, and it has nothing to do with this ...


3

The と is quotative. You can parse the sentence in brackets as: 『ルールがなくなると、就職する会社を探すための時間が長くなって、一生懸命勉強できなくなる。』と心配する学生もいます。   The と in ルールがなくなると is conditional. Literally: There are students who worry / Some students worry (saying) "If the rules are abolished, the time to find a company to get a job in will get longer, and I won't be able to study hard." ...


3

Xになると and Xとなると are synonymous set phrases that mean "when it comes to X..." or "as for X..." They have nothing to do with something becoming something else.


3

我こそは literally means "I am the...", but this is actually an idiomatic phrase that means something like "I am the right person (to do it)" or "let me do it". 我こそは 自分こそはと勢い込んでいうときに用いる。「我こそはと進み出る」 It is usually followed by と, which is a quotative particle you are probably familiar with. In case you did not know why this と is not followed by 思う/考える/etc, ...


3

と is a rather symmetric particle overall: 'I met Tanaka' has the sense of 'Tanaka and I met'. に is less symmetric: e.g. I went to Tanaka's office to see him. It may also be a difference of status, rather than of motion: 社長と会いました seems pretentious because it creates an equality of sorts between the CEO and me.


3

「錬金術師{れんきんじゅつし}らの間{あいだ}でも 神{かみ}への冒涜{ぼうとく}と(#1) 暗黙{あんもく}のうちに禁{きん}じられていると(#2)聞{き}きますし」 The first 「と」 is not quotative. The second 「と」 is. In the phrase 「冒涜と禁じられている」, the 「と」means 「として」 ("as"). It describes in what specific way the action/state of 「禁じられている」 is performed (and maintained). In this context, that specific way is "as a blasphemy". 「禁じる」 is ...


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