22

「にほん で ぼく は しんかんせん を のります。」 is a nice attempt. I would, however, like to address two items here. 「のります」 simply means "will ride". If you want to say "want to ride", you might want to say 「のりたいです」. 「Verb in Continuative Form + たい」 means "to want to [verb]". 「のり」 is the continuative form of 「のる」. The next thing I need to point out is the particle ...


7

This で represents a relatively minor usage, which can be translated "at the point/stage", "at the time when", or "when in/at" (often with implicit contrast to some other points). 前回の微妙だった部分 unimpressive features of/in the previous (game) 前回で微妙だった部分 unimpressive features (existed) at the point of the previous (game) Of course, in this case, the meaning ...


7

外へ遊びに行く (head outside to play) -> The implication here is that the actor is not currently outside, and will head out to play. 外で遊びに行く -> This sounds odd because it means that the actor "goes to play" when he's already outside. It's not really clear where he would be going, if anywhere. This is similar to saying something like, "go out outside" in ...


6

One of the definitions of ところで is 「時に(ときに)」 'at the time of ____', 'as _____ happens/happened'. 'As I solved the last question, the bell ending the test sounded.'


5

When まま means "as-is" or "without modification", まま can work as a noun, a no-adjective and an adverb. You cannot say ままで: "to pay as told" 言われるままを払う: OK 言われるままに払う: OK 言われるまま払う: OK *言われるままで払う: wrong "to speak as one feels" / "to describe one's feelings as-is" 感じたままを話す: OK 感じたままに話す: OK 感じたまま話す: OK *感じたままで話す: wrong (~た)ままで can be used when a certain state ...


4

I think the fundamental thing here is that the main verb is 行く, which is a movement verb and thus has a directionality associated with it. It requires a destination. For now, let's ignore the 遊びに, which is used to specify intent/purpose for the 行く action. Then the sentence basically boils downs to 外で行くvs 外へ行く Here is where the directionality matters. 外 ...


4

This フレンチ is French cuisine, not French people nor France. This では is basically specifying the focus/scope of the sentence, so "in the field of French cuisine", "concerning French cuisine" or "when it comes to French cuisine" would be the literal translation of this フレンチでは. Compare it with these similar examples: ボクシングでは、相手をキックするのは反則です。 ...


4

「 ケータイが大{おお}きな音{おと}で鳴{な}っています。」 All particles (and many other words) have more meanings and usages than small or online bilingual dictionaries tend to tell you. This is the 「で」 that is used to describe the manner or mode in which an action is performed. In what manner is the cellphone ringing? At a high volume, right? Some home-made examples would be:...


4

In Japanese, the use of particles for time references is generally predicted by whether the time reference is fixed or relative. For fixed time references, the particle に is used to mark the time word. For relative time references, the particle is usually omitted. Examples of fixed time references are named days, times, dates, years, etc. Examples of ...


4

According to the comment, the correct sentence is: コンピューターの技術は、ここ10年でずいぶん進んでいます。 The computer technology has advanced greatly in the last 10 years. Or: コンピューターの技術は、ここ10年でずいぶん進みました。 The computer technology advanced greatly in the last 10 years. ここ + time-length is a way to say "last ~". For example ここ3日で is "in the last three days". To say "next ~"...


3

I think the でいい here means "it's ok to...", "There's no problem in..." So, I believe "Only one hero is enough" is a good translation if there's context for that, like if the person who got answered that said before that "one person/here is not enough", etc. I would interpret it as either: It's ok for a hero to be just one person. Only one hero is ...


3

This "で" is used for decision-making situation. For example, you and your friends are talking about when to go traveling. Your friend: いつ旅行に行く?来週もしくは再来週? When are we going on trip? Next week or the week after next week? Me: 再来週で。 Okay, then. Let us leave on the next week after next week. Your example sentence also describes which one to choose ...


3

That particle's function is to specify location. And yes - that comma means "and' or like juxtaposition. So the step-by-step translation is like: 前件で結果、後件で理由を言う → in the former: 結果; in the latter: 理由 を言う → the result in the former; the reason in the latter, it says. → It says the result in the former, then the reason in the latter. Thanks for ...


3

思い出でする means "to do something as(because of) a memory", this で is a postpositional particle that is used for "cause", "reason". For example, 彼女と初デートの場所でキスを思い出でしたい. 思い出です means "Something is a memory", です is a copula. 思い出でした can mean the both meanings. For example, 彼女と初デートの場所で、キスを思い出でした(I kissed my girl friend at the our first date place as a memory), ...


3

The original sentence was interrogative and used「AはBよりC」construction in it 九州では東京よりさくらが早くさきますか。 I could have written something, using simpler constructions but I decided to use the construction with 「同じ」 In that case I think it'd be natural to respond using 「同じころに」("at around the same time"), not 「同じくらい早く」("as early as"), like this: 「いいえ、九州では(orでも)、...


3

This is a review about French cuisine, served at French restaurant Salle à manger F. The context is: French cuisine. フレンチ usually refers to the cuisine. People are generally フランス人 or フランスの人, the language is usually フランス語 or フランスの言葉. 知る人ぞ知る is used to describe knowledge limited to a select few. The reviewer writes later 「シェフは、フレンチでは知る人ぞ知る有名な方です。」I would ...


2

I think this フレンチ is referring to French Cuisine (フランス料理) not French people. Here's a similar example also with the phrase「知る人ぞ知る」: 伊兵衛織{いへいおり}は、きもの通{つう}の間{あいだ}では知る人ぞ知る織り。 Ihei-ori is a weave known well among kimono connoisseurs. So フレンチでは知る人ぞ知るシェフ probably means something like, フランス料理(またはフランスのこと全般)をよく知っている人な間では... So one way to translate the ...


2

Note: This answer is more in response to you saying you want it to be easier to understand, as opposed to the interest in the history. This isn't backed up by any research, but the way I think about it is similar to the で used when stringing together adjectival nouns: きれいで賑{にぎ}やかなまちだね? - It's a pretty and lively town, right? Similar to て-forms, I see the ...


2

The で in それで is a marker for reason or cause. There is another usage of 「で」in addition to the usages you stated in your question. This is 「で」as a marker for reason or cause. A(noun)で、B。 Due to A, B. When using で as a marker for reason or cause, there is a constraint: the result clause cannot be volitional, i.e. it has to be an action or event the ...


2

Your translation is actually good overall. You can split this long sentence into two and interpret them individually. 本式のメリーゴーランドの馬のように大きくはないけれど、それにしたって持って来る時は国雄さんとお父さんと二人がかりだったっていうんですもの、 It's not as large as a genuine merry-go-round horse, but still, I heard it took two people (Kunio and dad) when they brought it there! っていう (=という) describes hearsay ("...


1

I understand the sentence now. I was unable to articulate her explanation of the で particle's function in my edit. I've been looking in textbooks. but I can't find any function that explains her understanding of the particle here. some example sentences she wrote me: トムは必死「で」帰国の準備をしています。- 必死「で」-> 必死「に」でもどちらでも同じ意味になります。 私はトムが帰ってしまうので暗い気持ち「で」過ごしています。-> ...


1

I take this で as functioning like the English "about" or "with" and being more or less synonymous with (more formal) "において". This usage is pretty common, I think. Thus we find ample examples like this on the web such as: "私達の対応で悪いところ・残念なところを教えてください。" "Please tell us about bad points and/or disappointing points about/with our response/treatment." "...


1

でも meaning even/but/however is the て form of the copula です. The て form can allow you to do many things, but the most basic use is that it allows you to join to clauses together. You can think of it as meaning "and." も is the inclusionary particle which you use when you want to say "also" or "in addition too." An example of でも would be 先生でも間違{まちが}います。Even a ...


1

A Japanese sentence can sometimes be translated a few different ways into English: (The cell phone is ringing with a loud noise.) is correct as well, but less natural in English from my experience. I believe the Anki cards are just trying to help you by using the most natural sentence in English even if it omitted the dictionary definitions of で, in this ...


1

順番に describes something being done in turns regardless, whilst 順番で describes something being done in turns and the order is important. Regarding the given example under main question: 彼らは順番に歌を歌った。 They each sang in turn. Each of them took a turn to sing. That tells everyone of them sang, regardless of whom was first, next, or last. In this example, ...


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