5

The sentence is supposed to be ご無事でよかった! but for what ever reason (perhaps the feeling of relief the speaker felt was particularly strong) よかった came out first, and ご無事で was added onto the end to make sure the listener knows what exactly what was よかった. This is perfectly natural, and we often do this in speech and writing imitating speech, but in formal ...


5

X に失敗する means "fail to X" or "fail to achieve success in X", in other words, your objective is met with failure trying to do X. Otherwise, it just means intransitive fail, or "make a failure". で is just there to indicate the circumstance. × 試験に失敗したが、合格することができた I failed the exam, but I was able to pass it. (contradictory) ○ ...


4

In the above two cases, 「に」and「で」are exchangeable with very little changes in nuance. You can say 「日本人の会話では下の例のように...」or「日本語の会話には、文の倒置も...」. When you say「AにはB」, you are just describing that A has the attribute B. On the other hand, by saying「AではB」, you are distinguishing A from other subjects by the fact B is established in A. If you think that "「~けど」や「~...


3

ないで is the te-form of ない, but it can be a continuation marker (if it's in the middle of a sentence) or a request marker (if it's at the end of a sentence). 見ないで! Don't look! 見ないで答える To answer without looking You seem to understand this. So the real question here is "Is there an imaginary period between 言わないで and 自己申告制"? However, no one can tell ...


3

The grammar ために is used to say "for the purpose/sake of". When using it to introduce your main clause, it's giving a reason for doing the main verb. That's different than で because で just denotes the "means" by which something is done/accomplished. The use of ために makes the thing or verb in the dependent clause seem much more important and ...


2

女の子の名前で雪花って変ですか? The で means 'in' or 'among'. I guess it's an abbreviation of の中で, but I'm not sure what difference that would make (not a native speaker). The って is a topic marker. This is equivalent to は but more casual/informal. The whole translation: Among girls names, is Yukika weird?


2

The answer might be grammatical but it sounds slightly off, you want to say Neko no esa wa doko ni arimasu ka. The whole "where can I find" idiom doesn't make sense in Japanese.


2

Your translation is actually good overall. You can split this long sentence into two and interpret them individually. 本式のメリーゴーランドの馬のように大きくはないけれど、それにしたって持って来る時は国雄さんとお父さんと二人がかりだったっていうんですもの、 It's not as large as a genuine merry-go-round horse, but still, I heard it took two people (Kunio and dad) when they brought it there! っていう (=という) describes hearsay ("...


2

'親切で有難う' is wrong. '親切を有難う' is acceptable, but '親切にしてくれてありがとう' is much more natural. More politely: 親切にしてくださりありがとうございます。 More formally (e.g. in a letter): (貴殿の / 皆様の)ご親切に感謝申し上げます。


2

I would say 病院はあのスーパーとホテルの間にあります。 - The hospital is between that supermarket and hotel. The に particle indicates where something is, so by starting with 病院に, you are saying there is something in the hospital. You could say something like: この病院にレストランがあります。- There is a restaurant in this hospital. The particle で indicates a location where an activity takes ...


2

(I know this is frowned upon, but given the comments I've received from the original poster, I've reworked my answer.) To me, replacing both of these "に" with "で" sounds off. As far as I've heard, "に" is usually taught as indicating the location at which something exists or the direction something moves in / its destination, and that you should use で for ...


2

Song lyrics has many ambiguous lines somewhat intensionally. So I think the both could be right. However, let me add a 3rd interpretation on this. After checking the whole lyrics I have just thought a different meaning. That is like this. いつだって同じで You always do like that. 分かり合ってる?・・とんだ勘違いだよ What a misunderstanding that you and me understand each other!! I ...


2

I believe everyone will read the sentence in question only as "I want to make an apple pie with apples". To say the other, you have to say リンゴを見てアップルパイが作りたくなった or something like this. Japanese particles (as well as English prepositions) each have many meanings, and the context is often the only clue. You have to get used to them by examples. (For example, ...


2

I think the で is indicating the method/way the 5 levels are determined. From 大辞泉 6 動作・作用の手段・方法・材料などを表す。…を使って。「電話で連絡する」「テレビで知ったニュース」「紙で作った飛行機」 「この御馬―宇治河のまっさき渡し候ふべし」〈平家・九〉 The examples don't have an embedded question but, here's some with questions: 「愛されるか」ではなく「愛することができるか」で男性を選ぶ 「GDP」をどこまで説明できるかで判明する 【クイズ】何問正解できるかで「あなたの犬好き度」がバレる. I think replacing で with の ...


2

In general (but not always), the word よく in the sentence-initial position is more likely to mean 'often'. When placed directly before the verb, it would be more likely to be the adverbial 'well'. The other parts of your grammatical analysis are generally fine, but misinterpreting よく has thrown you off, I think. Also, while 話 means story, it can also refer to ...


2

Your hunch is pretty close. In this case it indicates situational context. 入れ違いで亜美さんが出て行ったところです。 Ami was going out as we walked by each other.


2

This English translation is correct at least in that ~でも means "even (in/with/etc) ~". This 初めまして同士 means "two people who met each other for the first time" (or maybe "two first-timers" depending on the context). The first half of the sentence basically means "Even though it's a pair session of two people who met each other ...


1

で here functions like "due to".


1

The で here doesn't refer to location in this context. This で is used to link 形容動詞/na-adjectives. It lets multiple adjectives describe a noun in one sentence. 彼女はしとやかで奇麗な女の子です。 She is a refined, beautiful girl. 芸達者で食欲が旺盛な、ごくふつうの犬です。 A good at performing, big-appetited, extremely normal dog. (literal translation) An extremely normal dog that just happens to ...


1

Rather than a particle, this で is the te-form of だ. So the meaning of the relative clause attached to 方 is: “is a Chinese person and can speak Japanese”. You can compare it to the で you put after na-adjectives (example also from imabi): 東京は賑やかで面白い。 Tōkyō wa nigiyaka de omoshiroi. Tokyo is lively and interesting. Nouns and na-adjectives are not so different,...


1

その花屋はいつもきれいな花でいっぱいです。 その花屋はいつもきれいな花がいっぱいです。 Both sound good to me. 「XXでいっぱい(だ)」 means "(something is) full of XX" "(something is) filled with XX". 「XXがいっぱい(だ/ある)」 means lit. "XX is many" → "there are many XX". So the former literally means: "The flower shop is always full of beautiful flowers." And the ...


1

Can で be used with the past tense of the verbs, which do not show termination/end in itself, to highlight the termination/end of that action i.e. it got over at XYZ time/day/month e.g. with verb such as 食べる (Past 食べた), 読む(読んだ), 飲む (飲んだ) etc? Not really, regardless of tense. Sentences like 10時で食べる or 10時で食べた basically don't make sense. Depending on verbs, ...


1

Your use of で is perfectly fine. 描画 is a suru-verb meaning "to draw" or "(an act of) drawing". It is more suitable for geometric or technical drawing, like what you make with a CAD tool, a graph tool or Adobe Illustrator. An artwork typically created with SAI is usually called an イラスト, 絵, etc. How about: ペイントツールSAIで初めて描いたイラスト ...


1

There are various misses in your proposed translation. 餌【え】 could also be just "food for an animal". 凍【こご】える is an intransitive verb with a meaning more like "to become frozen and numb from cold". 誂【あつら】える is not "to make something to order", but more like "to request or order that something be done or made as one wants". It's about getting someone else to ...


1

When actions are performed in a location often で is used. 家で寝ている, 公園で遊んでいる. So my guess (given the lack of context) in this case the writer was trying to emphasize accidents caused through activities in this location, rather than just the location itself.


1

It's because the speaker grasps it as a phenomenon where some accident might happen. For example, when you say 事故があった (there was an accident), what you really imagine is not so much a scene where something static is left there as one where people do something. That makes you lean toward で.


1

In Japanese you can chain independent statements together by conjugating the statement in the middle into the te-form and just sticking them together. This is what's happening in your first sentence, with で being the te-form of だ. There are two complete statements there: お金持ちだ and きれい. Those both work as sentences by themselves. The と particle is used for ...


1

Do you know how you can use the te-form of verbs to mean 'and'? For example, 食堂に行って、昼ご飯を食べて、昼寝をする。 I will go to cafeteria, eat lunch, and take a nap. で is just the te-form of です.


1

I understand the sentence now. I was unable to articulate her explanation of the で particle's function in my edit. I've been looking in textbooks. but I can't find any function that explains her understanding of the particle here. some example sentences she wrote me: トムは必死「で」帰国の準備をしています。- 必死「で」-> 必死「に」でもどちらでも同じ意味になります。 私はトムが帰ってしまうので暗い気持ち「で」過ごしています。-> ...


1

For the case of 散歩, both are grammatical but with a slightly different meaning. https://youtu.be/5zpAze8KPtw?t=368 use を for "going across" (in and out) of something use で for "moving/circling inside" of something As mentioned in the video, while 通ります cannot use で since it only carries the "across" meaning, 散歩 can use either ...


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