9

This でも is used to mean "〜 or something", usually in regards to suggestions. It leaves room for other options. 食事でもどうですか → How about something to eat (or something else)? お茶にでもいかない? → Would you like to go out for tea maybe? 参照 The use of でも and ででも in this sentence


8

At the risk of winding up, within a few minutes, as one of those who tried to help, I shall give it a shot. At the very least, I am a Japanese-speaker. To me, the two sentences mean very different things from each other and they are not interchangeable. That is unless you have a particular situation in mind that is beyond my imagination.   「今週{こんしゅう}...


8

「でも」 is one of those annoying things that pop up all over the place and gets confusing because its function isn't always the same. Here's the usages of 「でも」 that I know. I'm sure someone else can give you a better answer but here's the gist of it. However/But 「でも。。。それ、違うよね。。。」 But...that's not right, is it... ~~~ or something/somewhere 「ディズニーランドでもいく?」...


7

「まったくおとうさんは現実的{げんじつてき}なんだから。さあ、テレビでも見{み}てちょうだい。ほら、キンちゃんがでてるわよ。」 Easier item first -- 「~~てちょうだい」. The only thing this can express is a friendly request. No exceptions. "please do ~~" Next, the not so easy -- 「でも」. Here, it does not mean "even". It is used to give an example instead of making a clear statement. "~~ or something" rather than "this or ...


6

I think by 「日本」 the writer meant "all of Japan" as opposed to just 長岡市 or 新潟県. That is the only justification for using 「も」 I can come up with. But in that case 「全国」 or 「日本中」 would be a more appropriate word. As written it sounds to me as if the fireworks were first and foremost famous outside Japan or 新潟県長岡市 weren't located in the country. So the 「も」 has ...


6

There is a difference in nuance. でも implies that "normally it isn't but in this case it is". 私は難しい仕事でもする。 This implies that 通常私は簡単な仕事しかしないが・・・実は難しい仕事でもするよ。(I normally do only easy jobs, but actually I can also do difficult ones.) 私は難しい仕事もする。 This implies that the person speaking normally does easy, (moderate), and difficult jobs. No emphasis is ...


5

1) No. The first は before "15年" is not necessary contrastive and it can be taken as a simple topic marker. The second は is a variant of the contrastive usage of は and means at least or no less than. See: Does は mean 'at least' in this sentence? 2) This でも is even, not but. "even the person who has lived the shortest ..." See: "Even a crab" ...


5

Do you have a reason or something why you can't write it? From Wiktionary, the 5th definition, "or something".


5

I feel that, this use case of でも is an abbreviated form of であっても。 (Note, I recognize there exist those uses of でも which do not fall into this category.) So in here, もし時間がないなら、明日でもいいよ。 is an abbreviated (or colloquial) form of もし時間がないなら、明日であってもいいよ。 which translates to: If no time, it is OK to be tomorrow. Or something like that. Please note that this is ...


5

In order to know how to understand it here, you have to understand the function of the words that are being used in the first place. 「残念」 here acts as an adjective. How can you figure it out? Well you have to ask yourself those questions: 1) How is it? 2) What is it? And try to answer them yourself. You will see that the answer to the first question is ...


5

According to 明鏡国語辞典: で-も ㊁〘副助詞〙 ❽ 《少量を表す語について》肯定表現で、せめてそのくらいの意を表す。「少しでも分けてやりたい」 The でも in your example means "at least". 半額だけでも = just half the amount, at least. An example from Shogakukan's Progressive Japanese-English Dictionary: 1巻だけでも印刷したらよかったのに。 We should have printed the first volume, at least.


4

Great question. For the sake of keeping my answer shortish, I am going to assume that you understand everything in the sentence before the comma. I'll edit the answer if that isn't the case. :) There are two parts to that monster particle of yours: に and でも。 The に particle is the particle that indicates direction, someplace a person goes. In this case, ...


4

でも is a particle which has several meanings. In this case it roughly means "~ or something like that", "... for example" or "maybe". See: Function of "でも" in "とでも言うべきであろうか"? and confusing usage of でも 餌付け【えづけ】 is a noun derived from the masu stem of a verb. It means "taming an animal by means of feeding it", and it can work as a suru-verb....


4

これでも (literally "even with this" or "in spite of this") in this context means "in spite of the (bad) result (of being late)" or "although you may be thinking I'm lazy". これ in これでも often refers to the speaker's appearance, but it can vaguely refer to any "bad situation" at hand.


3

体を張ってでも反対する means that the one who 体を張る is identical to the one who 反対する while 体を張っても反対する means that those two are different. 体を張ってでも反対する: I would rather risk my own body to oppose it. 体を張っても反対する: I oppose it even if you risk your own body. Edit: couldn't 体を張っても反対する be interpreted as "even if I risk my life (body)"? Practically yes, but that sounds ...


3

You have to use で and say 彼は画家でも教師でもあります or 彼は画家であり教師でもあります, both in written and spoken Japanese. If you want to make it shorter, you can say 彼は画家[兼]{けん}教師です. 彼は画家も教師もです is almost always ungrammatical, but in a rare unagi-sentence, it may make sense. みんなの将来の夢について。私は将来看護師になりたいです。佐藤君はサッカー選手です。田中君は画家も教師もです。


3

I am not quite sure whether this is a general answer but as for the two examples, they are both gramattically correct while there is a slight difference in nuance. でも is more a "even if", while も is "even/also" examples: 私は難しい仕事でもする。 "I will do any job EVEN IF it was difficult." 私は難しい仕事もする。 "(I will do easy jobs) AND ALSO difficult ...


3

I'd like to have a better sense of the context of this sentence but as it is it seems like the speaker is telling the listener something more like I'm sorry to say it but it can't be helped or It's unfortunate but can't be helped (despite one's efforts) In that case the でも would take on the meaning of "even" or "but".


3

I'm sure that someone can give a more specific etymological answer but も as a particle is appended to the て form of です, sort of like 何をしても, so it isn't two particles で and も. You're dealing with ~ても in this case. Basically 何でも means "no matter what," which has the same functional meaning as "anything" in a lot sentences 中華なら何でもいい (if it's Chinese ...


3

どなた is an honorific version of だれ ("who"), and どなたか is an honorific version of だれか ("someone"). でも is a particle that implies the preceding phrase is not the only option. You can translate it as "something like", "or so" etc. You can also use a softener word such as "maybe": でも[係助] 3 物事をはっきりと言わず、一例として挙げる意を表す。「けが―したら大変だ」「兄に―相談するか」 See: Meaning of "...


2

I suggest 携帯さえ持ってないほど. Another option is 携帯すら持ってないほど. And 携帯でもないほど doesn't make sense but 携帯もないほど and 携帯だってないほど make sense.


2

One way to think of it, which I found in the Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar, is: でも = て-form of です/だ + も = verb meaning “to be” + particle meaning “even”* 〜でもいい is the です/だ version of the grammatical pattern 〜てもいい, which we use when asking for permission to do things. By putting the verb です/だ in its て-form, we can then ask if the thing itself (a ...


2

でも can be used in a few ways as you can see in the dictionary, but the one you are looking for now is even/also. Basically, he is saying that even half the amount would be appreciated. half the amount would also be appreciated.


2

As for 1) and 2), noruto's answer is perfect. I'll only give an explanation of 3). The complete sentence for "一番長い方は" is, I think, "日本に来てからの生活が一番長い方は the person who has lived for the longest time since coming to Japan". In Japanese language, as you also know, what is already commonly understood among people involved is generally omitted. Before the phrase ...


1

Yes, this でも means "or something like that", indicating face washing is not the only option. Although this でも is placed between 顔 and 洗う, it means "(I should) do something like face-washing" rather than "(I should) wash something such as my face". The sentence means he/she could do something totally different to kill time and get relaxed, like watching TV, ...


1

残念でもしかたない。 I know でも to mean either 'even..', '..or something', or as separate particles で+も. None of these interpretations really seem to fit here. You can construe this construction as: 残念で(ある) (I'm/It's) regretful も but 仕方(が)ない (there) is nothing/no way (I can do). It's regretful, but it can't be helped.


1

今週の週末でもいい? In English, Even if i'll go this weekend, is it ok? The literal translation: Even this weekend is ok? 今週の週末はいい? In English, If i'll go this weekend, is it ok? The literal translation: this weekend is ok? Those sentences seems someone to talk to companion is promising i'll go to somewhere. So i translated that.


1

These two have a major difference in meanings. どちらか片方が罪を背負った方が良い。 Either of two should bear the sin. どちらか片方でも罪を背負った方が良い。 At least one of the two should bear the sin. The latter sentence is very close to the sentence below: どちらか片方だけでも罪を背負ったほうが良い。 And the following dictionary entry (quoted from デジタル大辞林) the best applies to でも in the ...


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