19

「って」 is the only correct answer here. When someone asks the question 「ねえ, 田中さん(   )どんなひと?」, the asker should basically have no knowledge of Tanaka, correct? That is where the topic-introducing 「って」 comes into place --- "this Tanaka guy", "this guy called --- what was his name, Tanaka?", etc. Using 「が」 is very unnatural (I would call it ...


14

The quoting particle と (or って) is tenseless, just as the quotation marks " for direct speech (she said "I want to sing"), or that for indirect speech (she said that she wanted to sing) are tenseless. The tense is reflected in the verb that is used with the quoting particle, e.g. ~といいました ~といった ~といっています In your example sentence, the correct tense for ...


14

生きてて良かったって、心の底から思える瞬間って、どんな感じかしら? These two って's are not the same. The first って is a quotative particle. From デジタル大辞泉: って 🈩[格助] 1 引用する語、または文の下に付いて、次に来る動作・作用の内容を表す。…と。「金を貸してくれって頼まれた」「読書しろって言われた」 The って is a quotative particle and means と. The two example sentences given in the dictionary can be rephrased as 「金を貸してくれと頼まれた」「読書しろと言われた」. って is more ...


13

This type of って is mainly used to repeat one's opinion, like "I'm saying ~" or "I told you, ~". So it's still quotative in a sense; the speaker is quoting their own previous statement. For example, depending on the context, 「寝ろって。」 can mean either "[Someone] told you to sleep" (quote from a third speaker) or "I told you, go to bed!". But って also often used ...


11

The te-form of the verb やる is やって. やれって is not a te-form but やれ (the imperative form of やる, which can conclude a sentence on its own) followed by って. This って is a colloquial version of quotative-と, and it's used in relation to 言ってたぞ in the previous sentence. 死んだじいちゃんがいってたぞ。もしもおまえが女とであうことがあったらやさしくしてやれって。 ≒ 死んだじいちゃんが「もしもおまえが女とであうことがあったらやさしくしてやれ」と言ってたぞ。 My ...


10

There is nothing incorrect or ungrammatical about the sentence: 「[私]{わたし}が[世界]{せかい}で[一番偉]{いちばんえら}いだって??」 because this is different from saying: 「私が世界で一番偉いだ。」, which is ungrammatical. 「だって」 in the sentence in question is placed after a quote, is it not? 私が世界で一番偉いだって?? = 『私が世界で一番偉い。』だって?? (私 = listener) Depending on the context, it may be: 私が『世界で一番偉い』...


9

は is fairly matter of fact. "Where is Shinjuku?" って is a little more nuanced. Its like "Oh, now that you mention Shinjuku...where is it?" or "Speaking of Shinjuku, where is that?" For all intents and purposes I gather the actual end-point meaning is the same but って is linking it more with something that has been previously said whilst は could just be ...


9

A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar has the following to say about this: When って is attached to a noun, it is close in meaning to the topic marker は。When って is attached to a sentence as in 外国で暮らすって難しいね。 it is closer in meaning to 「..というのは、..」. However, it is more colloquial and emotive than は and というのは。In fact, if the predicate does ...


9

The standard form is おもしろくて仕方ない, where おもしろくて is used as an adjective (not adverb) in the て-form for connecting predicates. (て-form adjective) + 仕方ない or (たい-form verb in て-form) + 仕方ない is a common phrase that means “It's so (adjective)” or “I really want to (verb)”. The nuance of this 仕方ない is “I can't stand it”, but it's not to be taken literally, ...


9

「えっ、インターネットで買{か}い物{もの}するのって危{あぶ}なくないですか。」 「のって」 here is two words -- both particles. 「の」 is a nominalizer; It turns verbs and adjectives into nouns. 「買い物する = to shop」 is a verb and by adding 「の」, it can be treated as a noun -- "shopping", "the act of shopping", etc. 「って」 is an informal particle used to bring up a topic and use it as the ...


7

This って is simply a more colloquial form of the topic marker は.


6

It looks like you have got the gist of the phrase. 「どんだけ~~って話{はなし}ですよね / だよね / だよな, etc.。」 has been a very common informal/colloquial phrase expressing one's surprise at something one has seen, heard, etc. The dictionary form of 「どんだけ」 is, of course, 「どれだけ ("how", "how much", etc.)」, which is used in exclamations. The 「って」 is quotative. ...


6

美人ってだけで means 美人というだけで、美人という理由だけで. So it is translated as " It's said that beautiful women are cheeky simply because they are beautiful."


6

The 「~って」 expresses 同格 (apposition). Means 「~という」. According to 明鏡国語辞典: って 🈩 〘格助詞〙 ❷ 同格を表す。・・・という。「エゴン・シーレって画家、知ってる?」「用ってほどのこともないんだが・・・」「気にしなくてもいいってことよ」 The って in your example is the appositive case particle. The examples in the dictionary can be rewritten as 「エゴン・シーレという画家は知ってますか?」「用というほどのこともないんだが・・・」. 「って」 is more colloquial than 「という」. Your ...


6

Ignore my suggestion in the comments! Actually I think the way you should interpret this is "what difference does it make if he's riding the train?" Grammatically some key points are: 乗ってたら is a contraction is 乗っていたら, which is a condition of 乗っている ("is riding") なんだっていうんだ is kind of a set expression for "what difference does it make?" それがどうした is another ...


6

「俺{おれ}のことは、みんなと同{おな}じように親父{おやじ}とでも呼{よ}んでくれや。親父のように強{つよ}くたくましく頼{たよ}りになるってな。」 Is the speaker quoting what other people have said about him? From only the two sentences provided, one could not know for certain whether others have actually said to the speaker「You are 親父のように強くたくましく頼りになる。」. All that can be safely concluded is that the speaker would like the ...


5

誰だって知られたくない過去ってあるし、俺だってそうだから 誰だって = 誰でも? = no matter who/anyone 過去ってある = 過去___? = speaking of 過去, it exists 俺だって = 俺___? = I ... too Right. 誰だって means 誰でも. "No matter who" → "anyone". The って in 過去って means は・というのは. 「知られたくない過去はある」「知られたくない過去というのはある」 lit. "Speaking of 知られたくない過去, it exists." The だって in 俺だって means "also/too" or "even".   それだけじゃない、...


5

You have got this one correct. 「Verb Phrase or Mini-Sentence + ことだって、ある」 means: "There are also/even times when ~~~." It is sayig that ~~~ is totally possible. 「~~だって」 basically means 「~~もやはり」. The comma there is unnecessary and it is usually not used at all. The author might have had a reason for using a comma, but without further context, we ...


5

世界に出たからってファイナルまで残んなきゃ稼げねーし Just because I entered the world doesn't mean I can earn money without making it to the finals. から: because って = といって = "even though", "however" in this case. 明鏡 defines this as: といって 連語〔接続詞的に〕前の事柄を認めたうえで、それに反する事柄が成り立つ意を表す。…だけれども、しかし。…だとしても。「気持ちはわかる。━認めるわけにはいかない」 In general, you can learn X(だ)からといってYない as a pattern that ...


4

って = というのは in meaning. 「って」 is an informal topic-introducing marker that is frequently used in casual conversations. 「24[時間]{じかん}[行動]{こうどう}(を)[共]{とも}にするって、こういうこと(だ)。」 「Aって、こういうこと(だ)。」 = "This is what A means." A = Spending 24 hours with someone / Being with someone at all times


4

This 増えてってる is a contraction of 増えていってる (or 増えていっている). Here いって(い)る is the progressive of the subsidiary verb いく. (This verb derives from 行く, but being a subsidiary verb is usually written in kana.) Attaching to a main verb (here 増える) it characterizes the action described by this verb as ongoing or as getting stronger. 借金が雪だるま式に増えてってるって噂だよ people say that ...


4

This て is the same as って, the colloquial quotative particle similar to と. The small-tsu is unheard because it's located at the beginning of the sentence. (When written, this っ is usually omitted at the beginning of a sentence, but may be preserved in casual light novels and such.) It may be obvious to you, but this (っ)て refers to what was said in the ...


4

I think you're onto something here and I'm not completely sure how to best analyze it, but this might be a first start. The usual って in reported speech has no effect on the pitch. However, there is a colloquial use of って which indeed raises the pitch of the last mora before it: 食べるって【LHLLL】 normal pitch accent 食べるって【LHHLL】 colloquial pitch accent The ...


3

「どのくらいって、山と田地が少しあるぎりで、金なんかまるでないんでしょう。」 この「ぎり」は「きり」とも発音され、副助詞です。「っきり」という形で恐らく既にどこかで見かけているのではないでしょうか。 意味は「だけ」、「かぎり」となります。従って、「少しあるぎり」は「少しあるだけ」というように解釈すれば問題なく理解できると思います。 また、この「ぎり」は、「義理」とは何の関係もない言葉です。発音も違います。 「ぎり」: 「ぎり{HL}」 「義理」: 「ぎり{LH}」


3

In addition to meaning と, the って particle is also commonly used to introduce a topic (essentially functioning as a very casual-sounding version of は). I think this usage originally comes from an abbreviation of とは, but it's used much more widely than とは itself would be. In the sentence you've provided, we have both uses in succession, so it could be ...


3

Both are the same meaning 殺さずに生け捕るってのが面倒でしたがね 殺さずに生け捕るのが面倒でしたがね the って is a abbreviation of という which is emphasizing 殺さずに生け捕る.


3

This って is not related to "if ... then" described here. This って is simply a colloquial variant of the quotative marker と, which is used with 分かる, 言う, 考える, etc. If you saw "if" in someone's translation of this line, that's from the conditional particle ば in 止めてしまえば. Parse this line like so: 「信じる事を止めてしまえば、楽になる」ってわかってるけど


3

って is a casual form of the "quotation" particle と. しろ is the imperative form of the verb する. So the two are completely separate in terms of conjugation (i.e. しろって is not a "form" of the verb する, but a verb with a particle attached). The reason they are adjacent in the sentence is because someone is asking what someone said, so the quotation particle is ...


3

Let me put a more correct-ish translation first: 神さま気取りの人が言うの/ねえ 人は強いって You know, those who think they're gods say: "people are strong" そんなの嘘だよ No, I don't believe it Do you agree? Now for your question, I'm very sure that そんなの嘘だよ is another sentence. Putting the quoted speech after the main verb (anastrophe) is frequently heard in conversation. ...


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