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5

It seems to me that 知った振り and 知ったか振り are basically interchangeable, but 知ったか振り is a little more frequently used in everyday conversation or daily situations than 知った振り. These are the examples found on the web. 知ったかぶりをする男性って本当にうざいと思う。 女性の知ったかぶりは、場合によってはかわいく思える。 同僚の知ったかぶりには、いつもイライラさせられる。 大事な仕事で知ったかぶりをされると、トラブルにつながる。 「知ったかぶり」は印象が悪い Of course, all of these are ...


4

No, it doesn't. か is the question tag in Japanese and of those three clauses, only the last one is a question. If you want to be strict with the translation, it would be In France, we are researching the strength of the virus, the possibility of the disease being serious, and how much the virus has spread, etc. But in English, it sounds more natural if the ...


4

The basic structure of this sentence is: 日本刀と他の刀との違いはXです。 The difference between Japanese swords and other swords is (in) X. The "is" in the translation simply corresponds to the copula です at the end of the original sentence. There is no need to change it to something else like "could be". The "X" part consists of two nested ...


3

For "Please do A or B", I think you can use ~するか~してください, as in: 「更新をスタートするにはシャットダウンするか再起動してください。」(Windows) 「事前に窓口でお求めいただくか、インターネット予約をご利用ください。」(バス会社) 「このままお待ちいただくかしばらく経ってからおかけ直しください。」(電話が混んでるときの音声メッセージ) Likewise, for "You can do A or B", I think you can use 「~するか~することができます」, as in: "In my work break I can either eat my sandwiches ...


2

This is just my feeling as a native Japanese speaker. They are interchangeable in most cases but have different implicit nuances. Some articles just say "interchangeable" because the differences are really tiny, especially verbal communication. For beginners or intermediate-level learners, it doesn't matter, because the nuances are less than the ...


2

I would parse it this way: The difference between Japanese swords and other swords is this: How much do they care about "how beautiful are the ripples and iron?"? And since this way there are essentially two implicit questions in this phrase it makes sense that there are two か.


2

This か is a question marker, and いつの事だか is an embedded question. Usage of か after a clause? As the above link says, it's okay to have だ before か in embedded questions, and the が between the noun and わかる is usually dropped. いつのこと(だ)?: "When was it?" (an ordinary question) いつのことだか: "when it was" (an embedded question, now a noun clause) ...


1

In ビルさんは日本語は簡単だと言いました, Bill is the one who said “Japanese is easy.” The statement clause is 日本語は簡単だ. (By the way, 簡単だ is not a verb but an adjective.) Similarly, Mike is the one who doesn’t know who will come in マイクさんはだれが来るか知りません. The original clause だれが来る is a question because it contains a question word だれ. と is the only correct choice in the practice ...


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