22

These are sometimes called embedded questions, but if you look them up you'll find a variety of terminology in use, including "embedded interrogative content clauses" and "indirect questions". I think the か in embedded questions is more or less the same か used to form regular questions. But there are a couple differences: In an embedded question, it's ...


12

(I know what "から" and the sentence-ending "か" mean, but not this) Yes, it's this から followed by this か. から here is a reason/cause marker. か is a question marker but is used like "presumably" or "probably" here. And 興奮 is "excitement", not "doubtful interest". 興奮: excitement 興奮から: due to his excitement, ... 興奮からか: presumably due to his excitement, ...; ...


11

I would bet that か here is used in the following sense 驚きや感動の気持ちを表す。(that is how I translated it above). Is it really so? I am afraid that is not the case. 「~~といったところか」 simply means "I would say ~~~". It implies that the statement would at least be fairly accurate if not 100% accurate. This is a way of talking as much to yourself as to your listeners/...


9

「自分{じぶん}がどんな人{ひと}であるかを知{し}ってもらいたい。」 ("I want you/them/people, etc. to know what kind of person I am.") This is a completely grammatical and natural-sounding sentence, including the use of 「を」. Why can を act on a particle? I understand のか, なんか as they are compound words which can be treated as nouns, i.e direct objects by を (or so I believe), but why here?...


8

かのよう(だ) translates as ‘(seems) as if...’ or ‘(seems) as if perhaps...’ while (depending on the sentence) ようだ can be less conjectural. …なにもなかったかのように… ‘as if nothing had happened’[1] …なにもなかったように… ‘it looked like nothing had happened’ However, in counter-factual statements, ようだ can lend this meaning all by itself. Often (as in the sentence of the ...


8

sawa's answer explains the の, but I feel のか as used in the question hasn't been fully explained. It doesn't correspond well in this situation to "is it the case that...?", because that is a question that demands an answer. This particular use of のか doesn't. I doubt it would be said with a questioning tone. "So you have that/those kind(s) of doubt(s)/...


8

超【ちょう】 is "over/above ~", the antonym for 未満. 2m超のヘビ 100kg超の体重 This か is a question marker. か after a noun/suru-verb is a typical "headlinese" expression meaning "there is a possibility that / suspicion of ~". It corresponds to a question mark in English headlines. また賃金削減か More Wage Cuts? 英国、EU離脱か UK to Exit EU? / UK Exits EU? (...


7

First of all, the meaning is the same. 'questioning the former.' なぜ彼がそんなことをやったか、わかりません。 なぜ彼がそんなことをやったのか、わかりません。 どうして彼女がそんなつまらない本を読んでいるか、不思議です。 どうして彼女がそんなつまらない本を読んでいるのか、不思議です。 are all natural. のか This is a combination of の and か. This の is called 準体言助詞, which makes a noun phrase out of a verb phrase. 「それを食べたのは、いけないことだ。」(It is bad that ...


7

That sentence is grammatical and natural-sounding. In fact, all of the following patters are grammatical. 1) 「Mini-Sentence + か + 確認{かくにん}する」 2) 「Mini-Sentence + か + を + 確認する」 3) 「Mini-Sentence + か + どうか + 確認する」 4) 「Mini-Sentence + か + どうか + を + 確認する」 1) and 2) are used (far) more often than 3) and 4) as using 「どうか」 could at times make it ...


7

You should think of this like から+か. If there wasn't a か, the following would just be a statement of a fact. The から is used to give the reason for the unusual fluency of the foreigner (in this case it is because the foreigner was excited/agitated). 興奮から銀髪の外国人の口調は、いつになく流暢だった。 With the か, the speaker is no longer certain for the reason. The speaker is now ...


7

「インターネットで注文{ちゅうもん}したセーターは、実際{じっさい}に着{き}てみるまでサイズが_____が、ちょうどよかった。」 A. 合{あ}わなかった B. 合うかどうか知{し}らなかった C. 合わないかもしれない D. 合うか不安{ふあん}だった First of all, A and C are out of the question as neither one logically fits the context. From my personal experience with Japanese-learners, I know many of them would think B was correct, but it is not. B is "...


6

かな can state any degree of probability, from nearly zero to all but certain. Another important feature is that かな conveys intent of communication, thus it could imply request or desire so much as English "I wonder". This word is usually only used in non-polite sentences (in most cases, the polite counterpart is でしょうか). Down to your particular case, the ...


6

This か is the same as the particle we see all the time at the end of an interrogative sentence. It's also used in a noun clause like so: いつ車を売りますか? When do they sell the cars? いつ車を売るか (noun clause) when they sell the cars 今日は日曜日ですか? Is it Sunday today? 今日は日曜日か (noun clause) whether it is Sunday today Therefore, "車の会社がいつごろこのような自動運転の車を売り始めるか" ...


6

This is simply because we don't usually use が to express the number of something. I think you already know (子供が)3人いる, (リンゴが)5個ある, (本を)3冊買う and so on are grammatical. Number + counter can work as a noun too (e.g., 3人が集まった), but it's relatively uncommon. In addition, ページ is a tricky counter that means both "n pages" and "n-th page", depending on the context. ...


6

知るか and 口が裂けても言うものか are both Japanese rhetorical questions. The actual meaning is 知らない ("I don't care", "None of my business") and 口が裂けても言わない ("I won't say it no matter what"), respectively. 楽しいことか sounds unnatural, but you can form a rhetorical question like 楽しいわけがあるか, 楽しいものか or 楽しいはずがあるか, which actually means 楽しいわけがない ("No way it's fun"). なんと楽しいことか is ...


6

Be careful when translating to/from English because there is some overlap with certain words like these. 誰でも means "anyone" in the sense of "whoever". マラソンに参加する人は誰でもTシャツをもらう → Anyone who/Whoever participates in the marathon will receive a T-shirt MPAAレーティング・システムで「G」とは誰でも見られる作品です → In the MPAA rating system, a "G" (movie) is one that anyone can watch ...


5

Your explanation is right. The speaker is not quite sure if that's the right explanation (something like, "The blood has hardened, perhaps because a lot of time has passed"). The grammar you are looking for is defined in this page, which says: 疑いの気持ちで推定する意を表す


5

I am going to say yes here even though "exhortative" may slightly be too strong a word for it. The sentence-final 「か」 can certainly express inducement, solicitation, invitation, etc. and it is widely used in real life, not just in manga/anime. The exclamation mark, however, is completely optional. It is just used more often in manga than in real life ...


5

なまえはなんですか? vs なまえはなんだか? Is it normal/natural in the second case? How do you properly convey a question in this case if not with か? As a simple interrogative sentence "What is [your name]?", 「[なまえ]はなんだか?」 doesn't sound natural/correct. You can instead say: [なまえ]はなに? -- friendly, gender-neutral [なまえ]はなんだ? -- relatively masculine, can be blunt [なまえ]...


5

Can 何か be a question word? 何か here is not a question word. (「何 + か」 can be a question word in different structures.) [何]{なに}か here means "something". 「~か何か」 = "~~ or something similar" "~~ or something like that" (The か in 親類か is a parallel marker / 並立助詞.) implying that the speaker suspects the nighthawk isn't the kin of a frog, but something else ...


4

Your translation was correct in meaning. そんな嘘にオレがだまされっと思ってんのか!? I think the latter is the more colloquial version of the following: そんな嘘にオレがだまされっと思ってんですか!?(or思ってるんですか) So this: そんな嘘にオレがだまされっと思ってんの!? has the same meaning with perhaps less inquisitive emphasis, while this: そんな嘘にオレがだまされっと思ってんか!? sounds less natural to me. I think one could say ...


4

I haven't seen the show, so I'm uncertain of the context, but かな refers to "probably" in the translation. Ending a sentence with かな is a very casual way of expressing uncertainty. For example: あの人はアメリカ人かな。 I wonder if that person is an American. It's subtle, but "probably" might be a slightly too "certain" translation in this case (but again, ...


4

の sounds a little feminine but you can use it if you're male - so long as のか could also be used (兄弟いるの? you can say but not どういう事ですの?) It also has somewhat of an implication of asking for an explanation sometimes (何やってるの? - What are you doing [and why]?) Asking without a particle is probably most common informally - 手伝う? It has no real hidden implications, ...


4

To say "think that (some sentence here)", 思う always takes the quotative particle, と. So 映画館に行ったか思いました is ungrammatical. The following two sentences are grammatical: 映画館に行ったと思いました。 I thought (someone) went to the cinema. 映画館に行ったかと思いました。 I thought (someone) perhaps went to the cinema. / I wondered if (someone) went to the cinema. The か in the ...


4

If you want an honest answer, it has little to no value in the modern Japanese-speaking world. For the vast majority of Japanese-speakers, 「耶{や}​ 」 is just a kanji for that syllable used in some girls' names. Unless one is a kanji scholar or one just wants to nitpick for the heck of it, 「耶」 has no other use in modern Japanese.


4

The sentence can be roughly divided into three parts: そういえば、{ほかのボールがどこにあるか}もわからないのに、どうやって探すんだ? そういえば is a common set phrase, "come to think of it", "as I recall." ほかのボールがどこにあるか forms an embedded question. "where the other balls are". ~が分かる is "to know/understand ~". The following も replaces が, and adds the nuance of "(not) even". See: The meaning of 「...


4

This の is called "explanatory-no". Its basic role is to provide an explanation for the current background context. When it's used with the question marker か, のか seeks clarification or explanation for the current context. Explanatory のだ (んだ) Question Markers: か and の What is the meaning of ~んです/~のだ/etc? How is the "のです" working here? As described ...


4

Grammatically speaking, か in Sentence 1 and か in Sentence 2 are a bit different. In Sentence 1, か is simply like "or". In this case, the second か is optional, but is usually omitted in modern Japanese. リンゴかバナナ(か)を買う。 私か佐藤さん(か)が行きます。 In Sentence 2, the two か's are forming two embedded questions placed in parallel. In this case, か cannot be ...


4

I believe what you are looking for can be found in a grammar dictionary, not a standard dictionary. According to A Dictionary of Advanced Japanese Grammar, this ものか is "a phrase indicating that the speaker wants to do [something] or is wondering what one he/she should choose". In the context of the sentence you gave, it would be "how one should do/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible