11

This question is trickier than it may appear to many J-learners and here is why. OP's first sentence means what s/he stated in English NOT only because 「て」 was used but also because the two activities happen to be those that could not take place simultaneously -- "brush teeth" and "eat". 「て」 can certainly signify the sequence of activities, but it can also ...


11

(I know what "から" and the sentence-ending "か" mean, but not this) Yes, it's this から followed by this か. から here is a reason/cause marker. か is a question marker but is used like "presumably" or "probably" here. And 興奮 is "excitement", not "doubtful interest". 興奮: excitement 興奮から: due to his excitement, ... 興奮からか: presumably due to his excitement, ...; ...


9

「うん、もうすぐ[寝]{ね}るから。」 「から」 here is used like a sentence-ending particle, and that is one very common usage of the word in informal speech. We use 「から」 this way to make an announcement and see how the other person would react. More often than not, the speaker simply expects that reaction to be along the lines of 「わかった」、「それならいい」、etc. In other words, this 「から」...


8

Your translation is not correct. It seems that there are a few misunderstandings involved here. First, “AとB” here means “B if A.” 仕事が成立しない means “I cannot do my job.” 新聞に目を通していないと、仕事が成立しない。 I cannot do my job without skimming the newspaper. Next, ~から means “because ….” Therefore, your sentence is 新聞に目を通していないと、仕事が成立しないからです。 It is because I cannot ...


8

Here are the original lyrics: 夜が明けたら一番早い汽車に乗るから 切符を用意してちょうだい 私のために一枚でいいからさ 今夜でこの街とはさよならね わりといい街だったけどね The から in the first line simply means "because", and the first line works as the reason for the second line. "Because I will ride the first train when dawn breaks, please arrange a ticket (for me)." or "I will ride the first train when dawn ...


7

時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 時間がありませんでしたからパーティーに行きませんでした。 While the second one is relatively a bit politer than the first, neither of these are very casual nor polite. If you said these directly to the host of the party, the host would probably feel offended. If you said these to your close friend, he/she would feel that the "~でした" part is unnaturally ...


7

Both sentences have minor issues even though they may be considered good in Japanese as a foreign language. At least, both are grammatical. 「から」 actually sounds more casual/informal than many J-learners seem to think. That is the impression that I get from speaking to them. The more formal words with the same meaning would be 「ので」 and 「ため/ために」. With 「...


7

In a sense, yes, but に is the correct choice here. 受ける takes two objects, a "direct" and an "indirect" object. を marks the direct object, i.e. what is being received に marks the indirect object, i.e. from whom the direct object is being received を will not be translated at all, and に will be translated as "from". から, too, often means "from" but applies ...


7

And more importantly, when is it appropriate to use, Almost always, although it may sound a little bit informal. When asked "なぜ" or "どうして", you'd answer with からです。 なぜ遅れていますか? なぜなら、目覚まし時計が壊れていたからです。 (Why are you late? Because my alarm clock is broken) and how does it differ from ですから and んです? ですから is a connective, not a final part. "Aですから、B". If ...


6

There is a fairly big and important difference between the two that makes it impossible for us to use them interchangeably all the time. 「AからBまで」 means "from A through B" when both Point A and Point B are defined clearly and precisely without hinting at a possible range either temporally or spatially. 「9[時]{じ}から15時までアルバイトをしています。」 = "I work part-time from ...


6

独身{どくしん} で ハンサム だから ね Without further context it's hard to tell who is the subject/object of this phrase, but it shall be read: It's because だから someone is single and... どくしんで handsome ハンサム


6

のじゃから is the exact same as のだから; in certain dialects, the plain copula is じゃ rather than だ. This is also used in fictional 'role language' to mark a character as elderly or rural.


6

You should think of this like から+か. If there wasn't a か, the following would just be a statement of a fact. The から is used to give the reason for the unusual fluency of the foreigner (in this case it is because the foreigner was excited/agitated). 興奮から銀髪の外国人の口調は、いつになく流暢だった。 With the か, the speaker is no longer certain for the reason. The speaker is now ...


6

When a series of actions is listed with the verbs in the ~て conjunctive form, the list can parse out to "[VERB], then [VERB], then [VERB]..." Years ago, a friend of mine at work laughed after getting off the phone with his wife, when he realized that she'd explained her day using almost entirely ~て-form verbs. My memory is fuzzy, but it was something like, ...


5

That use of と should be conceptualized as “with”[1], and not “from”. “Xと離れる” is “to separate[2] with X”. Since you can both separate with and separate from something, both と and から work here (albeit with the subtle difference between “separating with” and “separating from” something[3]). “Xから聞く” is “to hear from X”. Replacing this with と would change the ...


5

Quite simply, that just means "Out of a 10,000-yen bill, (please)!". She is demanding her change as meanly as the clerks are treating her.


5

As far as meaning goes, 「丈少年をかこんでなごやかな子どもたちの写真をとらせてください。新聞に大きくのせますから。」 = 「新聞に大きくのせますから、丈少年をかこんでなごやかな子どもたちの写真をとらせてください。」 The dictionary definitions of this 「から」 would be "because" or "as". My own would be "so that (I will be able to) ~~", "so that (it will enable me to) ~~". This 「から」 is often placed at the end of a sentence.


5

In the sentence ◯◯に電話がかかった に indicates the recipient of the phone call. It would be very confusing if you suddenly tried to indicate the caller with に as well. に and から are not both viable options to indicate the caller, because に is already used to indicate the recipient. If you used に to indicate the caller, it would be like trying to say "I got a ...


5

を is always an object marker in modern Japanese. It never replaces personal pronouns. Where did you see such a rule? noun + を at the end of a sentence is a fairly common device found in lyrics, slogans, posters and such. In general, it often means "I/We want/need ~" or "Give ~". 彼女にお茶を。 (lit. "(we need) Tea to her") Serve her a cup of tea. 犯罪者に死を! ...


5

I'm going take a different tack on this from everyone else. If you go back to earlier Indo-European languages such as Latin, but more so like Sanskrit, you see a very similar use of the ablative case to express both the idea of "from" and "because". There are still vestiges of this in English when we say something along the lines of From what I've seen,....


5

This から is the same から that indicates origin or source, which often translates to the English word from. Here 私から means 私 is the initiator of the action of "talking to her properly". In this case, on the surface level it may not be that much different from the subject marker が, and so the sentence can justly be translated to "I'll have a proper talk with ...


5

……せめて。せめてこれから君{きみ}が苦{くる}しまなくて済{す}むよう、君にお守{まも}りをつけておくよ。 I think he means something like: "At least I will wear a charm for you so that you don't need to suffer after this." (Or does he mean that she will wear it? I'm a little confused because of "君に" in the second half.) It is the listener, and not the speaker, who will be wearing a charm. 「君に~~をつける」 ...


5

Many usage examples of 真っ昼間 involve drinking alcohol during the daytime. According to this page, it is stated that it is typically used to describe an action or occurrence that is not normally done during the daytime, often with a judgmental (or surprised) tone. This definition is more in accordance with the use of から than に, as in 'from such a time as would ...


5

Both ~に始まる and ~から始まる are possible; it's just that they emphasize different things. Xに始まる emphasizes the precise time that something begins, with the focus being on that specific point. The particle に pinpoints that exact moment as a temporal identifier of the stated event X. Xから始まる emphasizes the fact that there is a span of time which started from a ...


5

「[Name, pronoun, title, etc.] + から + 言う、話す、伝{つた}える, etc.」 is often used when: 1) The person chooses (or chooses not) to be the one to bring up the topic. 2) The person is only allowed to give a certain amount of information. In both cases, the verb will often be in its (positive or negative) potential form. Thus, the sentence: 「詳{くわ}しくは俺{おれ}...


4

I think you need to look at the nature and type of verb. かかる is an intransitive verb of direction ("virtual motion" in cyber space) and the sentence describes the direction of the subject, the telephone call: It is natural to describe the starting and finishing points with から and に. It would be different if this were a transitive verb, or an action being ...


4

I think it has something to do with the proceeding sentence. If you compare 「昨日は寝れませんでした。」 to 「函館山からの夜景を見るといいですよ。」 (from the example referenced in Enno's post), the latter is a suggestion, while the former is a fact. Making up some other examples with "suggestions", 「彼と会ったほうがいいと思いますよ。とてもいい人ですから。」 and 「その授業は取らないほうがいいと思いますよ。先生がとても怖い人ですから。」 seem fine as well. ...


4

I think 暑いから水を飲みました is natural.


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