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20

Certainly vocabulary helps, but you can get quite far by considering the structure of a sentence. Nouns are usually written in kanji (or katakana) and are practically always followed by a particle (を, が, は, から, etc.) (unless they are followed by a copula で, だ, です, etc.) The stem of verbs (including adjectival verbs, or "i-adjectives") is usually written in ...


13

Separating words in a sentence, at least when done by computer, is called segmentation (分かち書き) or tokenization (トークン化). When using an IME to input Japanese, when you hit the space bar to convert the kana to kanji, the IME has to segment whatever it is that you typed, then use a dictionary to replace the kana with its kanji. As you've probably learned by now, ...


13

「たって」 is from the verb 経つ{たつ}, meaning "to pass (time)". It's usually not written in kanji. も is a particle attached to 二週間, and when attached to a counter it means the speaker believes that that amount is a lot. もう学校始まってから二週間も経ってるよ It's already been two weeks since school started!


11

Unfortunately, there is no easy and clear rule to determine which parsing strategy is correct. The general rule is "Choose the shortest and simplest parsing strategy as long as it makes sense". It depends on the context, your vocabulary, and your common sense. But please don't worry too much — English speakers also do similar things every day. Compare ...


10

Your understanding is correct. Note that your understanding is not a translation of the source text. Your questions What is the subject of the above sentence? "Subject" implies the subject of the verb. For the main verb on the end, なります, the grammatical subject matches the topic of the sentence: インターネットの手続き, or "the procedure for getting an internet ...


10

I think you're parsing it incorrectly... It's 未+完成, not 未完+成. [未]{み} - prefix, "not yet" "un-" [完成]{かんせい} - "completion" "accomplishment" "perfection"


9

The pattern A を B にする is very common. (I used to offer my students a small prize if they could find two pages of continuous Japanese prose that didn't contain an example.) It means "make A into B", "have A as B", "treat A as B", "regard A as B", and so on. Here, 北を上にして in both sentences means "making North the top", "having North as the top", " treating ...


9

It's two words, みせ + で. みせ (店 in kanji) is a noun meaning store, shop, or sometimes restaurant. で is a particle which is similar in purpose to at or in in English. See: Japanese Particle で あの: that みせ: restaurant で: at 食べましょう: let's eat


9

Can adverbs modify adjectives? Yes. That's part of what adverbs do. Consider: [と]{●}[て]{●}[も]{●}赤【あか】い車【くるま】 a very red car [ま]{●}[ぶ]{●}[し]{●}[く]{●}明【あか】るい青空【あおぞら】 a dazzlingly bright blue sky Is 大きく modifying 厳しい? No. At least, not directly. In your sample sentence, as you correctly parsed it, the 大【おお】きく is not being used as a direct modifier on ...


9

I'd say it's not a double-headed relative clause, because it's actually 誰か[[[行きたい]人]いる]? That is to say, 誰か is modifying the full predicate of 「行きたい人いる?」. You can scramble to 「行きたい人誰かいる?」, which supports that 誰か is not in the relative clause. However, even with this analysis, it is a somewhat confusing grammatical structure, since 行きたい人 and 誰か could ...


8

In this context, きれる does not mean "to be cut", but rather attaches to the 連用形 (-i form) of a verb and means "to be able to completely [verb]". cf. the EDICT entry for 切れる: (suf,v1) (16) to be able to do completely When used in this sense, きれる is typically written in kana rather than as 切れる. So, we have 死にきれる (that's the verb 死ぬ, not the noun 死 + ...


8

It's Korean:  ヨボセヨ   여보세요  yeoboseyo   'Hello' (polite)  ペゴパヨ   배고파요  baegopayo   '[I'm] hungry' (polite)  チキン    치킨    chikin    'chicken'  ピリョヘヨ  필요해요  piryohaeyo  '[I] need' (polite) The third column is Revised Romanization. The glosses on the right aren't supposed to be a perfect translation, just to give you a general idea of what it says. (I'...


8

Your interpretation is correct. This 〜に思うこと is equivalent to 〜に対して思うこと. 実際使って直接肌で感じる冒険者の方が、その武具に思うことはいっぱいあるみたい。 It seems that adventurers who actually use and experience it firsthand have more thoughts about that armor. I can't grasp the full context from this excerpt, but 思うことがある often implies critical, nuanced, or complicated thoughts/feelings. ...


8

You are parsing it incorrectly: 二週間もたってる is 二週間も + たって(い)る. も is sense 一・④ in 大辞林 も 一 (係助) [...] ④ 極端な物事を指定し、強調する。…さえも。「聞いたこと–ない話」「太っ腹の社長–、今度はまいったようだ」 and is for emphasis. たって is the te-form of 経つ (as in 時間がたつ "time passes")


8

You are correct about や . Looking at jisho.org, it gave me the definition I was looking for, so I'm not sure you looked hard enough. やかん is a kettle, and the "peeping" sounds are the kettle whistling.


8

信じようとしていただけかも知れない Pulling it apart Let's break this down. 信じようとしていた In turn, this phrase is: 信じよう The volitional of 信じる. と The particle. して する in the conjunctive ~て form. いた いる in the past tense / completed aspect. The main meaning here is "had been trying to believe". The construction [VERB: volitional]とする parses out to "try to [VERB]". だけ "...


8

みあ stands for meow, the sound tone of the cat. そのとき、腕の中でしどけなく溶けていた猫が急に身を固くしてみあ、と鳴いて。 The whole sentence means Suddenly, the cat, which was just lying liquidly in man's arm, quickly restored its body, and "meow"-ed out. (forgive my poor translation -w-||)


8

I believe that the name is highly likely to be もえ instead of ももえ. While both names exist, the context makes it clear: the sender (the green balloon) asked first whether they can have the phone call and the replier (the white balloon) is replying 私ももえと電話したい. If it were to be interpreted as 私、ももえと電話したい, it will sound abrupt and out of context, since 私、...


7

Your first translation, "It could have become something better." is very good translation. Literally, reading just one phrase ならなかった, it means "did not become". (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかった。 (It didn't become more cheaper.) In other cases - connected with ものか(もんか) for example - the meaning of ならなかった will change. (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかったものか。 (This could ...


7

おなじ部屋でアシスタントをおだてて、なだめすかして、『いま俺、(アシスタントに対して)言い過ぎたかなあ』なんて思いながら二時間ぐらい過ぎたりしてます。『いまのは俺が悪い』、『いや、あいつ(←アシスタント)のほうが悪いだろう』、とか(思いながら)。 こんなのでいいでしょうか・・・


7

For both sentences, you can translate the 「〜たら、……だった」 as 'it turned out to be ...' Also, both of the 〜たら have the meaning 'when', not 'if'. 発車のベルが鳴っているので飛び乗ったら、反対方向の電車だった 発車のベル 'the bell announcing a departing train' 飛び乗る 'to hop onto (the train)' There's a missing subject. I'm translating it as 'I' barring further context. The 'generic you' as you ...


7

無事勝利 is two words. Here 無事 is used as an adverb which means "without trouble" or "safely". 勝利 is a simple suru-verb that means "to win". 無事 here is interchangeable with 無事に. I think you already know how to turn a no- or na-adjective into an adverb by adding に. Some words work as standalone adverbs without に as well as standard adjectives. 絶対に = 絶対 = ...


7

You are correct. からかっちゃ is a contraction of からかっては, where からかう is the verb you came across in your comment. Although it is probably better translated here as "tease" or "harass". So speaking about the dog, 繋がれてるからってからかっちゃダメですって → Just because he's tied/chained up doesn't mean you can tease the dog!


7

Did you copy it as it was? 日本にきていやな思いとか一いつもしなかった? The 一 before いつも is a kanji 一【いち】, not a long vowel marker or a dash. You can confirm it by copying it to somewhere else and apply some serif font. While a dash or a long vowel marker can be typed just by pressing -, the kanji 一 is unlikely to appear by a simple mistype. So I think she really wanted the ...


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