14

The length of a text written in Japanese is usually measured in characters (e.g. 400文字). One often writes handwritten assignments at school/university on 原稿用紙 genkō yōshi (lit. "manuscript paper") which come in standardized sizes, for example 20 x 20 = 400 characters. (See What is the name of paper to train how to write kanji?) So a 2000-character ...


10

The cause is most likely that your font setting (of a program or OS) have gone wrong. As far as I can see the said character in the input box looks rendered with a Chinese font. The glyph you see and the intended Japanese one share the same meaning and the same code point in Unicode (Han unification). Thus computers cannot tell which is which binary-wise, ...


9

In DTP jargon, per-word rubies (A) are called グループルビ (group-ruby), and per-kanji rubies (B) are called モノルビ (mono-ruby). There's also an intermediate convention called 熟語ルビ (jukugo-ruby). Are there objective criteria to prefer one style over the other? Basically, prefer mono-ruby (B) for ordinary compounds where there's one-to-one correspondence between a ...


7

There is no prescriptive rule that covers where to end the katakana section when you write mimetic words, interjections and slang words in katakana (because they are colloquialisms anyway), so we don't have the "right" answer. It mostly depends on personal interpretation: that whether you want katakana-ify the concept or the word when you do, and ...


6

Some 表外漢字 like 狼 and 嘘 are perfectly safe in ordinary writing. Some are simply too difficult. It largely depends on the character. Personally I can read 鰐 but not 鰰/鱸. See also Why are the names of plants and animals often written in katakana? 旧字体 was the standard way of writing in the past, so it's natural if the text is related to periods before WWII. It ...


6

巻【まき】の七十二 is just a traditional way to say "Volume 72". Were it not a ninja manga, we would normally say (第)七十二[巻]【かん】. の is the only way to connect a noun to another in Japanese. Unlike English, you cannot directly attach "with", "from", "by" and such to a noun unless via の. The の alone is thus the most ambiguous and ...


6

Not many scripts/alphabets have two "cases" like the Latin script does. The Latin (English, German, French, ...), Cyrillic (Russian, Ukrainian, ...), Greek and Armenian scripts have cases (Indo-European languages), but most other scripts are unicase. Quora - What are the languages that have both capital letters and lowercase letters? Other than ...


4

It is usually used before consonants that are categorized in phonetics as plosives or stops, affricates, and unvoiced fricatives, or more precisely unvoiced sibilants. Stops: the initial sounds of か /k/, が /g/, た /t/, だ /d/, ぱ /p/, and ば /b/ Affricates: the initial sounds of ち /tɕ/, じ or ぢ /dʑ/, つ /ts/, and ず or づ /dz/ Unvoiced sibilants: the initial sound ...


4

Manga typesetting is a science in itself, but in this instance I think there is no "empty line", it is just some extra space that visually separates the part in the larger font (larger for emphasis / louder voice) from the rest of the sentence. In general such white space might also indicate a brief pause.


4

I think this is really something that different kids will know at different times - because it's a symbol, not a kanji character, as the linked question answers. I personally was taught this symbol and its origins by asking my teacher when I was in the middle grades of elementary school, but that's just me. I'm sure that there are others who knew about it ...


3

In terms of pronunciation, these could all be read as the same word. Though instead of writing そーじ one generally would write そうじ. But in terms of meaning, my dictionary lists eight different entries for そうじ only one of which is 掃除. Context matters in Japanese. Some of these homophones are very technical. Such as 僧寺 or 奏事 and quite a few others are listed ...


3

はさみ and ハサミ are both very common, and you can use whichever you prefer. はさみ is definitely not a loanword, but there are words that are conventionally written also in katakana. Animal/plant names are the best-known example (see this and this), but there are other similar words (カンナ, ノコギリ, メガネ, クルマ, ...). Experts and enthusiasts may tend to use the katakana ...


3

I agree with @Simon in the comments: since the gemination comes from the く in ひゃく, ひゃっ should be the natural choice when writing ひゃっキロ in kana and I would not be too surprised to see [100]{ひゃっ} [km]{キロメートル} as furigana in a textbook. (That said, in all textbooks for beginners I could find, there actually seem to be no furigana at all — try to search the ...


2

Edited: Both Kotobank and Goo refer to this term, so it would seem legit. I may ask a blind question of some HS teachers in Japan to get more confirmation. Links: https://kotobank.jp/word/%E7%9C%9F%E7%89%87%E4%BB%AE%E5%90%8D-536813 https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/%E7%9C%9F%E7%89%87%E4%BB%AE%E5%90%8D/ Additional information with example text in links: ...


2

The standard way to write 1 km in kana is いっキロ, いっキロメートル, いちキロ or いちキロメートル. Since キロ(メートル) is a loanword from English, it should be written in katakana. That site (wasabi-jpn) seems to have chosen the all-hiragana style in that page because kana is used like pure phonetic symbols. I guess they thought switching the types of kana depending on the origin of ...


2

Afaik, we don't use spaces in any sentence, except at the beginning of a paragraph (However, this use is only seen in novels, textbooks, news articles, and newspapers). Instead, we use punctuation marks (句読点 | I know the English language has them too). I don't think 何時までですか would use 句読点, though. As for the comment of yours, it's very likely that such spaces ...


2

卷ノ(の)七十二 can be read in two ways. The first 二十七ノ卷, this is an old way reading Japanese letters from right to left. The second 卷ノ七十二, this is a new modern way reading them from left to right. Even as a native speaker of Japanese, I am a little perplexed, and have done a little search about his Manga. The answer is: 卷ノ七十二, meaning Vol. 72.


1

I find a very useful tool for this sort of question is kanshudo.com. If you look up a word there, and then go to its "Details" page, it will list all the different ways the word can be written and give a bunch of details about which forms appear to be used most frequently, based on various corpus searches. So if we look at the kanshudo page for ...


1

You can just enclose the action with parentheses. For example, "Looking up It will be raining soon" will be (見上げながら)雨が降りそうだ。Note that full-width parentheses()looks nicer than normal parentheses () in Japanese sentence.


1

No, it's not a modern convention. Hiragana has been in common use for over a thousand years. For example, "Genji Monogatari" was written in hiragana. What has changed is that Japanese has been increasingly standardised. See the Meiji restoration and the end of World War 2 as being events that prompted moves for standardisation. Before these events, ...


1

The wikipedia article for 芸妓 says that, in Kyoto, 芸妓 is pronounced げいこ and sometimes written as 芸姑: 芸妓を「芸妓(げいこ)」(「芸姑」という表記もあり)、見習を「舞妓(まいこ)」と呼ぶ。 So yes, this seems to be a real but rare word/spelling.


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