20

It's just a coincidence. According to this article, the word 「写真」 and its usage predates photography. The 「真」 part referred to 「人の姿」, so 写真 was used to mean 「姿を写したもの」, and was used for other things such as ink drawings, 浮世絵, and other illustrations of people. From the article: このフォトグラフィ以前の写真とは、(王様や身分の高い)人物の姿をそっくりに描くことを指している。日本でも天皇の写真のことをかつては「御真影」と言ったが、...


18

「こんこん」 is just about the only onomatopoeia for a fox's cry. It is almost unbelievable what your native speaker friend(?) has told you. In fact, 「こんこん」 can even mean a "fox" itself just like 「わんわん」 can mean a "dog" when speaking to toddlers. See what デジタル大辞泉{だいじせん} says. [副] 1 せきをするときの声を表す語。 2 狐{きつね}の鳴{な}き声{ごえ}を表{あらわ}す語{ご}。 3 ...


17

「のそ」 is an onomatopoeic word describing a slow walk, slow body movements, etc. We also use 「のそのそ」 and 「のそりのそり」. You can forget "a moment later" for good as it has no such meaning.


16

No, it's not. Wikipedia says: 日本語の「写真」という言葉は、中国語の「真を写したもの」からである Japanese "写真" comes from the Chinese meaning "Copy/reproduction(写) of the reality/truth(真)" Source is 『日本語源広辞典』(Nihongo Genji(?) Jiten). P.S. The shutter sound is usually written as カシャ or パシャ.


15

「なんでえ 大{だい}の男{おとこ}が まっぴるまから 酒{さけ}くらって のたのたしてよう」 「のたのたする」 is a colloquial expression meaning "to wander around idly", "to act in a highly unproductive manner", etc. It is in the "famous" verb pattern 「onomatopoeia + する」. "What the heck! A big man (= grown man) drinking like a fish and wandering around idly under the broad daylight!" The entire ...


15

For mumbling, there are 「ブツブツ」、「ボソボソ」、「ブツクサ」, etc. Those three are commonly used. If you did not know, we have an onomatopoeia for "everything" including things that do not even make any actual sound.


13

This is either a typo or a "reado". Trying to reconstruct the original sentence from your rōmaji version, I'm guessing it is 茂作の顔に息をフーッと吹きかけた フーッと is listed in some dictionaries (e.g. WWWJDIC) ふーっと フーッと (adv,on-mim) with a whiff; with a puff The ッ is small (compare ッ with ツ) and is geminating the following "t" sound. The romanization of the ...


13

It is not 100 percent clear, but I will try to list up the many theories that have been established: Japanese does not have as many verbs as other languages to express subtle nuances of an action. For example, in English, we can say daddle, waddle, trudge and toddle, whereas in Japanese, you would express these nuances with mimetic words like のろのろ、よたよた、とぼとぼ、...


12

I am going to post a rather simplistic answer just covering the basics.  There are cases (1) where adding a 「と」 is appropriate, (2) where adding a 「と」 is inappropriate, and (3) where only adding a 「に」, not a 「と」, is appropriate. 1) When an onomatopoeia functions adverbially to modify a verb, a 「と」 is often added. In very informal speech, on the ...


12

うぃっく It's an imitative sound of a hiccup often used to describe drunk people.


10

Yes it's definitely slangy but somewhat common. Other examples include: ピヨる from ピヨピヨ, to be stunned (by a strong attack) もにょる from もにょもにょ, to mumble, not to know what to say, etc. ボコる from ボコボコ, to beat (someone) This type of verb formation is relatively common with foreign words, but it's not limited to them. You may sometimes see verbs formed even from ...


9

I just had a look in Shogakukan's Kokugo Dai Jiten Dictionary. The ポイ in ポイ捨て is pretty clearly the adverb ぽい(と). ぽい(と) in turn appears to be a variation from ぷい(と), itself a variation of ふい(と), related to adverb ふ(と). Onomatopoeitically, ふい and ふ even sound a bit like something rushing through, possibly related to verb 吹【ふ】く "to blow", and indeed, even ...


9

Generally, 〜してる indicates the state of that onomatopoeia, while 〜する is describing the stimulus that caused it. Say you are watching an intense movie with a friend. ドキドキしてる = (My/your/his/their/our) heart is pounding ドキドキする = (This movie is) heart-pounding Here is an example where the two can mean different things: 膝がガクガクしてるね = Your knees are ...


9

ごにゃごにゃ isn't a commonly seen mimetic word, but understandable as a mixture of two more frequently used ones. ごちゃごちゃ: unordered/messy/jumbled ごにょごにょ: muttering/mumbling/murmuring So you could say: ごにゃごにゃ: mumble-jumble :P


9

「グジュグジュ」 is indeed an onomatopoeia describing something being wet, watery, damp, etc. (often, if not always, in a grubby way.) Onomatopoeias often have multiple variants to them: therefore, many of them cannot be found in dictionaries. We also say 「グチュグチュ」、「グショグショ」、「グチョグチョ」, etc. Here, it is talking about the inside of a dog's ears by using the ...


8

This グリって is a mimetic adverb (擬態語) which is basically the same as グリグリ(と): 押さえつけながら強く回すさま。「ひじで肩を―(と)もむ」 It's similar to グルグル(と)/グルっと which describes how something rotates smoothly. But グリグリ refers to a more forceful, unsmooth movement/rotation.


8

Someone pointed out to me that all of the "H" group sounds (is there a name for them?) are laughing sounds. I forgot what the nuances were, but I'll refer to this Pera Pera Penguin's 5-minute Japanese Class by Hitomi Hirayama. はははは - normal laugh ひひひひひ - conniving laugh ふふふふふ - creepy laugh; feminine laugh へへへへへ - shy laugh ほほほほほ - [elder] ...


8

Many onomatopoeia words are not mentioned in dictionaries, invented by mangaka on the spot, or change their meaning depending on the context/era etc. If you read a lot of manga you will eventually figure out "the rules" but there are some articles describing the general principles on how these words are constructed that could save you some time. I could find ...


8

Yes, きゃー represents screams of higher tone, and is clearly feminine or childlike. 黄色い声 is usually きゃー. Gay characters often say きゃー in manga, too. ぎゃー, on the other hand, is not necessarily masculine. When female characters use ぎゃー, it's usually bolder, more urgent, or stronger than きゃー (for example, a dying scream). In general, voiced consonants tend to ...


8

ポカーン seems like the closest to me. It is often associated with a blank stare. jisho.org has vacantly; blankly; absentmindedly (​Onomatopoeic or mimetic word) as the definition of the root ぽかん. Example images: ポカーン1 and ポカーン2


7

"のたのたする" is a colloquial expression of "[無為]{むい}に過ごす / [怠惰]{たいだ}に過ごす" meaning "to idle one's time away" as well as "のらくらする." のたのた、のらくら、のろのろ, all are a sort of onomatopoeic expression depicting laziness, inactiveness and slowness. We use ”のたのた” and "のたのたする" in such a way as: この忙しい時にのたのたしてるんじゃねえよ - Don't be idle in such a busy time. 今頃になって彼がのたのたやってきた ...


7

You misread one hiragana. It says こうぐってなる (So, not つ but う.) The comment 「語彙が…」 refers to the fact that the girl is using a lot of onomatopoeic expressions (instead of proper vocabulary) to describe the first bite of the cake. Here こう (sibling of そう、ああ、どう) means "like this". ぐってなる can also be written ぐっとなる and refers to some tight/cuddly/... feeling. ...


7

I would say 「じゃらじゃら」 is probably most common for that action, followed by 「カチャカチャ」. (Far) less common would be 「チャリン」 for handing multiple coins. That would, however, be a very natural onomatopoeia choice if you are dropping just one coin onto a hard surface.


7

とゆーか is a colloquial way of writing というか . It is mentioned as a colloquial form in the entry for というか in Weblio: 「てゆーか」のように転訛した形で表記される場合が多い。 As well as in the EN-JP version of Weblio and in Jisho.


7

とうとう is "finally". There is an uncommon adverbial phrase りんと (凛と in kanji), which usually means something like "in a cool/gallant/dignified/cold manner". See this entry. But this meaning does not make much sense to me in this case because the word is used to describe an inanimate object. I believe this is something heavily dialectal, or an idiosyncratic/...


6

It is not ビ and シッ but a single word ビシッ. It is a 擬態語 signifying firmness of an action. From びしっと in Daijirin: [2] 厳しいさま。ぴしゃりと。 びしっと断る (my translation: reject flatly) In your example, both ビシッ and the raised finger have the effect of showing that the character in the panel is stating her opinion firmly as if it were an objective fact.


6

I probably found this too late for my answer to be of interest, but I think I can shed some light on the mystery. The phrase used is a paraphrase of a line from a well-known (to Japanese children at least) song from Sore Ike Anpanman. I am not sure of the song's name, but the first line is 勇気の鈴がりんりんりん and it was played as the ending theme of many episodes ...


6

"ごう" is an onomatopoeic word and you know that the fire blazes furiously. Japanese can hear sound of "ごう" from furiously burning fire. "ごうと音がして" could be translated into "with a roar".


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