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The Question In an earlier version of your post, you had asked: I've seen two different English translations and I'm wondering which one is more correct. Other users commented and linked through to a related question that discusses the translation of the first line. However, that line does not touch at all upon the nue bird, as mentioned in your later ...


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Not a native speaker, so take this with a grain of salt. :) First, let's look at your bolded piece. Understanding 足りぬを探し I came across two possible interpretations of this phrase. The first is where I first landed, until I found an unexpected wrinkle that led to the second. Possibility 1 If memory serves, in Old and Classical Japanese, the 連体形【れんたいけい】 or &...


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The -(a)maposi optative auxiliary adjective is indeed connected with ほし "want," but the first part is different. It is derived from the simplification of -(a)maku [nö] posi, where: -(a)m- is trivially the ordinary modal (Classical む/ん); -aku is the nominal ending; posi is ほし "is desirable." In Nara Old Japanese, the construction is ...


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Yes, we can say it as "のたまって" too.


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My major is not linguistics but I found some interesting references for you. Aoki[1] introduces a few types of classification of transitive/intransitive verbs in Japanese. The first classification is written by Kuginuki[2]. It says there are 3 patterns of transitive/intransitive verb pairs. Depending on the type of conjugation (第Ⅰ群形式) 知る (四段活用 is an ...


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It's usually written in classical Japanese or kanbun kundoku. But be aware that Yamato-kotoba is not the same as classical Japanese. Typical 詩吟 pieces have many Sino-Japanese words. Mixing 詩吟 and modern Japanese may be technically possible but I haven't heard of something like that. It's perhaps like mixing Shakespeare's English and hip-hop. 詩吟 is a ...


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Probably the variant of 知人者智、自知者明。勝人者有力、自勝者強。知足者富、強行者有志。不失其所者久。死而不亡者壽 from "Tao te ching" by Laozi. The quote 『足るを知る者は富む』 : "He who knows that enough is enough will always have enough." is well known. Japanese scholar says Taoism and Zen Buddhism are highly related(cf.鈴木 大拙 : Daisetzu Suzuki ), but I think ordinary Japanese people don't ...


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First, some context The modern Japanese writing system consists of three types of characters. First you have the oldest type called the kanji, which literally translates to characters of Han (from the Han dynasty). As you can guess, these are Chinese characters (traditional, not simplified) that were adopted by the Japanese because they simply didn't have a ...


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