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1

While they both can translate "to measure", there is a slight difference. Even among dictionaries, there are difference in definition, so I am using the Japan Industrial Standard definition. 測定{そくてい} means to measure against a standard (unit) and obtain data. 計測{けいそく} means to use data from obtained through measurement and process it to obtain a ...


6

How about 「接尾語になる名詞」 or 「複合語の後ろの要素になる名詞」, perhaps? 「教える[甲斐]{かい}」「教え[甲斐]{がい}」 「困ること」「困りごと」 「サボる[癖]{くせ}」「サボり[癖]{ぐせ}」 「置く場所」「置き場所」 「行く場」「行き場」 「送る先」「送り先」 「帰る道」「帰り道」 「食べる[時]{とき}」「食べ[時]{どき}」 「食べる物」「食べ物」 「座る順」「座り順」(← probably colloquial. maybe only used in Kansai?) 「死ぬ[様]{さま}」「死に[様]{ざま}」 etc... ??


2

It appears to me the reason for choosing 「測定」in the last sentence may very well have been something to do with 「定」. See goo 辞書: 物事を決めて変えない。さだめる。さだまる。 This kanji has the meaning of "making certain", "determine", "to firmly establish", "to get fixed".「測定」means to determine the value of something accurately. So when ...


3

画面の左上 and 固定で表示 are something we say very often in the context related to computers, and in such situations people start to drop the particles between the two words. It's similar to how "winter sport", "Hollywood movie", "earth axis" and so on work without any preposition in English. (Although "top left of the screen" ...


3

Unless you use the kanji to name your child in a creative way (which is quite popular nowadays), you cannot. Only "nana" and "shichi" can be recognized as 7 alone. I think you'd agree with me, if you are an English speaker, that you couldn't pronounce "raz" to mean rasp, even if you say so in raspberry; nor "bird" to ...


2

No, I think very few people will understand you if you say なぬ、な、or なの individually to mean "seven". Although they are listed as readings, they only make sense when the are in compounds. If you look up 七 or "seven" (as a word) in a dictionary, the only pronunciations that appear will be なな、しち and ひち, which is dialectical. Although they are ...


0

Most likely お in お皿 is an example of so called 女房言葉 - basically a way of making words sound "polite" or "fancy" by using the お prefix. There are many other examples used in everyday Japanese: おでん、おかか、おこわ、おはぎ etc.


7

In osara, the o is indeed honorific and it is commonly written in kana as お, but sometimes also as 御. As you are likely aware, there is often some flexibility in choosing between kanji, hiragana and katakana to write any given text. As for osara, it would usually be written as お皿, because the honorific o is usually written お and because sara is usually ...


0

This is kind of a "feeling" answer, but perhaps it will be helpful. "3個のりんごを" sounds like 1) there are 3 specific apples that you intend to eat, or 2) you want to eat exactly 3 and no more than 3. "りんごを3個" sounds like you really like apples and that you want to (could) eat three. For example "2杯のビールを飲んだ" vs "...


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