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8

As a simple noun, 娘 does mean "(young) girl" as well as "daughter". Basically this usage is bookish, and it's not used outside established set phrases (e.g., 看板娘) in casual speech. Sentence ending in 娘 Usage of を in 自らを豊作を司る What purpose does ある serve in the sentence? What does 看板親父 mean? But that is not to say it's okay to address ...


7

How about 「接尾語になる名詞」 or 「複合語の後ろの要素になる名詞」, perhaps? 「教える[甲斐]{かい}」「教え[甲斐]{がい}」 「困ること」「困りごと」 「サボる[癖]{くせ}」「サボり[癖]{ぐせ}」 「置く場所」「置き場所」 「行く場」「行き場」 「送る先」「送り先」 「帰る道」「帰り道」 「食べる[時]{とき}」「食べ[時]{どき}」 「食べる物」「食べ物」 「座る順」「座り順」(← probably colloquial. maybe only used in Kansai?) 「死ぬ[様]{さま}」「死に[様]{ざま}」 etc... ??


7

In osara, the o is indeed honorific and it is commonly written in kana as お, but sometimes also as 御. As you are likely aware, there is often some flexibility in choosing between kanji, hiragana and katakana to write any given text. As for osara, it would usually be written as お皿, because the honorific o is usually written お and because sara is usually ...


7

The answer is nothing. Japanese does not have a special form for vocative other than nominative (not many languages have), and before the introduction of punctuation, you can just guess it from the context that it is an address. Even today, you hardly see commas and periods in speech balloons of manga, that means you still have to sometimes. And it is not ...


4

A J-J dictionary obviously needs to explain every word in Japanese, but this matter could be made much clearer if they did in English. 積み荷の一部 a part of cargo 積み荷の部分 (the) cargo part Xの一部 means that X is the whole to the part, while in Xの部分 the noun X is an extra description of 部分 that forms apposition. This is because what comes immediately before 部分 is ...


4

This is indeed an uncommon adverbial usage of 勢い, but it means something different from what you are thinking: 勢い Adverb 4. naturally; necessarily 勢い [副]その時のなりゆきで。必然的に。 So what is the previous sentence? Does "naturally" make sense? "Hit with force" would have been 勢いよく打ち付けた, 勢いをつけて打ち付けた, etc.


4

Here are a few etymology theories I've bumped into. サル -- Attested in Old Japanese. Not so likely to be from 勝【まさ】る. Might instead be from Ainu sarush or saro. Sar or sara means "tail", and -ush is a suffix that means "having". See also the relevant entries in Batchelor's Ainu dictionary. Both Gogen-Allguide and Nihon Jiten suggest ...


4

Is Hizashi a noun or a proper name? Yes. :) In more detail, hizashi is both. As a name As we can see here in Jim Breen's mirror of the ENAMDICT name dictionary, ひざし as a name may have the following spellings and name types: 陽 -- feminine given name, as indicated by the (f) marker after the "Hizashi" reading. 日差子 -- given name, of uncertain ...


4

Unless you use the kanji to name your child in a creative way (which is quite popular nowadays), you cannot. Only "nana" and "shichi" can be recognized as 7 alone. I think you'd agree with me, if you are an English speaker, that you couldn't pronounce "raz" to mean rasp, even if you say so in raspberry; nor "bird" to ...


4

What's the etymological linkage of 「眉{まゆ}」and「繭{まゆ}」? Ultimately, uncertain. What can we say about these etymologically? We do have some historical data on both terms. We know that both were previously read as mayo. Shogakukan's 国語大辞典【こくごだいじてん】 (KDJ) entry for 繭【まゆ】 ("cocoon") indicates that this is first attested in the 万葉集【まんようしゅう】 of 759 with a ...


3

私がいつも買い物するスーパーは野菜が安いです。 私がいつも買い物しているスーパーは野菜が安いです。 私がいつも買い物に行くスーパーは野菜が安いです。 私がいつも買い物に行っているスーパーは野菜が安いです。 These are all natural, and there is almost no difference in meaning. ている and に行く are both optional. Japanese speakers use this type of に行く a lot, and it won't make this sentence unnatural or wordy. See also: Habitual aspect いつも買うスーパーは野菜が安い is also ...


3

They are grammatically different. ご飯を食べている人 is "person who is having a meal". This phrase ご飯を食べている modifies 人. Nominalization with の is used for nominalizing a phrase or sentence. This phrase ラーメンをたべる is nominalized by using の such as ラーメンをたべるの. For example, ラーメンを食べる人が好き(I like the person who eats ramen), ラーメンを食べるのが好き(I like eating ramen).


3

Many theories indeed associate the names with various verbs, which can explain why they often end with る: サル ← 勝る カエル ← 帰る (to return)[1]; 孵る (to spawn)[2] ツル ← 連む (to flock) [3] ホタル ← 火垂る (for fire to drop) or 火照る (for fire to shine) [4] But each names has several other theories unrelated to verbs. It is impossible to prove the exact etymology of such old ...


2

It would be 可哀想なアリス for poor Alice. But don't say that to her face, this is used when talking to another person about Alice.


2

So, I'm assuming that this is either from the weblio entry or the kotobank entry of という, which are basically identical. You are understanding the first part of the sentence correctly. However, the second clause after the comma is not a restatement of the first clause. それを強調する意を表す expresses emphasis of that. "That", here refers to the time phrase/...


2

ご存じ is not a verb in the first place. It's a honorific no-adjective that has to be used with だ/です. You can think it roughly corresponds to "familiar/aware" with respectful feelings. I don't know why, but there is no direct honorific version of 知っている. Whenever you want to say "someone knows something" with respect, you have to use this no-...


2

It appears to me the reason for choosing 「測定」in the last sentence may very well have been something to do with 「定」. See goo 辞書: 物事を決めて変えない。さだめる。さだまる。 This kanji has the meaning of "making certain", "determine", "to firmly establish", "to get fixed".「測定」means to determine the value of something accurately. So when ...


2

画面の左上 and 固定で表示 are something we say very often in the context related to computers, and in such situations people start to drop the particles between the two words. It's similar to how "winter sport", "Hollywood movie", "earth axis" and so on work without any preposition in English. (Although "top left of the screen" ...


2

No, I think very few people will understand you if you say なぬ、な、or なの individually to mean "seven". Although they are listed as readings, they only make sense when the are in compounds. If you look up 七 or "seven" (as a word) in a dictionary, the only pronunciations that appear will be なな、しち and ひち, which is dialectical. Although they are ...


2

その without any context usually means whatever has been mentioned in the prior sentence. In this case そのねらい means the "aim"/"purpose" of ちょっと変った娘を装っている.


2

In Japanese, grammatical clauses are generally marked as such by adding a specific particle at their ends. For grammatical subjects, that particle is が. In your example sentence, the subject noun is 雨. Therefore the subject of your sentence is 雨が. Note that this is a tightly coupled single lexical unit. In other words, you cannot just insert stuff (like 明日) ...


2

I should probably leave it to a native-speaker or someone with a better understanding to answer. But, a quick answer is that when you address someone there's never a particle like は or が or を following. If you see ジョン without a particle or ジョンよ it's most likely direct address. But also, context often makes it very clear that someone is being addressed. ...


2

The informal version of "彼女はいつ来ますか?" is "彼女はいつ来るの?" "のか?" is a literary style, and it almost never happens in ordinary conversations in the real world. BE + -ING (eg "She is coming tomorrow") is an English way of expressing future tense. Japanese ている doesn't have such a function. See: https://www.wasabi-jpn.com/...


2

You could use a noun with 何も to express your opinion that something doesn’t qualify as the said noun at all. 何も悲劇ではない。 It is not a tragedy at all (although some may call it a tragedy). 何も名案ではない。 It is not a good idea at all (although some may claim it to be).


1

With an i-adjective, you can say: この本は何も面白くない。 This book is not interesting at all. 何も熱くないよ。 It's not hot at all! Keep in mind that i-adjectives don't take だ. With a noun, for example you can say: 彼には何も欠点がない。 He has no faults at all. 何も欲しいものはない。 I want nothing at all. Use 何も only in the context of choosing one type of thing from many possibilities. ...


1

I guess your issue is related to 連用形の名詞化. Correct me if I'm misreading your question, I may delete this answer. From 連用形 entry of Wikipedia 動詞の連用形はそのままで名詞にもなる(「つなぎ」「賭け」「救い」など)。連用形としての機能もこの名詞化機能が元になっていると思われる。それに対し、形容詞の連用形は一般には名詞にならない(ただし「近く」「奥深く」「朝早く」など、時間・空間的な程度を表す形容詞は名詞化が可能)。 From this article 日本語には、動詞の名詞化にあたって、動詞の諸活用形中の一形である連用形が、その ままの形で名詞に転化するという、...


1

In answer to your title question, noun+に has no special meaning at all. You should think of this に as working with the verb 徹する. This verb means "devote oneself to". The thing you are devoting yourself to is marked with に. 魔物が防御に徹するかのように動く。 The monster moves as though devoting itself to defense.


1

I'd say 彼女はいつ来るの? Just adding の right after the base form of verb works. This rule can be applied to other verbs like 戻る, 帰る, and so on. However, Japanese don't use 彼女, 彼 or 私たち so often. I actually pictured myself speaking and figured out that it would be more natural if we omit subjectives or specify persons' names. e.g. いつ来るの?, Mary はいつ来るの?


1

While they both can translate "to measure", there is a slight difference. Even among dictionaries, there are difference in definition, so I am using the Japan Industrial Standard definition. 測定{そくてい} means to measure against a standard (unit) and obtain data. 計測{けいそく} means to use data from obtained through measurement and process it to obtain a ...


1

Japanese is a topic prominent language and since apple りんご is the topic of the sentence, it should be placed at the start of the sentence. 3個のりんごを食べたいです。and りんご3個を食べたいです。both means the same thing - I want to eat three apples. Whereas, りんごを3個食べたいです means I would like to eat three apples Hope you find this helpful!!


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