19 votes
Accepted

Is なんです the same as んです?

I think you have a few things mixed up. Let's start with んです. This is not just one thing. It's two: ん+です where ん is just short for the nominalizer の. Generally, this may be untranslatable when ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
  • 10k
10 votes
Accepted

How to say "that" as in "the cow that ate" in Japanese?

In addition to naruto's answer, I'd like to point out that the relative clause "that" that's used in English (even in this very sentence) doesn't exist in Japanese, simply because the ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Use of consecutive particle の

I think #2 and #3 are ungrammatical. I think #1 is grammatical, but I would probably say more like... 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}ときの{規則/決まり/ルール}」 「ごみを{捨てる/出す}際の{規則/決まり/ルール}」 or more simply (and probably more ...
chocolate's user avatar
  • 65.5k
8 votes
Accepted

"No ga" .... -- what's this grammar rule?

If N is a noun then Nが好きです means "I like N". 何が好きですか means "What thing do you like?" の in 何をするの makes the 何をする a noun. So 何をするのが好きですか means "What thing do you like to do?"
Display Name's user avatar
  • 7,479
8 votes

Pitch accent of nominalizers

の (not same pattern with the postposition の!) after accentless verbs and na-adjectives: downstep before the particle なる{LH} "make sound" → なるの{LHL} かえる{LHH} "change (t.)" → かえるの{LHHL} ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Nominalizing verb with い-ending vs ーの

To generically answer your question as described in your title, masu-stem (aka 連用形) can often "nominalize" a verb, but the resulting nouns can have unpredictable meanings, and you have to learn them ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
7 votes
Accepted

Meaning of「残るは」in a sentence

For me this sounds like a shortened version of "残るのは"。 Usually the noun form of "残る" would be "残り" or "残るのは" etc, so this would be a rather rare(old-fasioned) and literal expression. According to the "...
HQMA's user avatar
  • 376
7 votes
Accepted

痛いの慣れた! How is particle の working here?

That の is a nominalizer, and a particle is omitted after it. [痛いの]{は/に/には}慣れた。
aguijonazo's user avatar
  • 20.7k
6 votes
Accepted

When の follows particles

Why the の is not translated has more to do with English grammar than Japanese grammar. Consider the following two sentences in Japanese: (A) 友達から手紙はぬすまれた。 (B) 友達からの手紙はぬすまれた。 The first one can be ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
  • 10k
6 votes

Why do we need to use 2 nominalizers もの and こと in the following sentence?

This 「もの」 is not a nominalizer. It is a noun in the full sense of the word, meaning "thing" or the pronominal "one" (in this case I think the latter is more applicable), which is ...
goldbrick's user avatar
  • 6,174
6 votes

When can you use の to replace a noun?

Statistically speaking, I think it's true that 学生じゃないの usually refers to a state ("not being a student"), whereas 白いの usually refers to an object ("white thing"). However, the correct meaning largely ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
6 votes
Accepted

Nominalized verb and connection to noun after が particle

I think you've misunderstood the sentence because of the ambiguities in the form Aが好きなBだ. For example, 犬が好きな人だ can mean both that (I am) a person that likes dogs as well as (I am) a person that ...
Ringil's user avatar
  • 8,514
6 votes
Accepted

すっごいレンジの音がしてるのが気になる。What does the second の mean in this sentence?

The second の is a nominalizing の. It turns the phrase 「すっごいレンジの音がしてる」 into a noun so the grammar 「Nが気になる」 can be used to mean "N is on one's mind" or a similar meaning. Another example of ...
katatahito's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How exactly are 準体助詞 and 形式名詞 different? In what regard? And where does の stand?

Let me use these labels in this answer: A: あれは彼のだよ。(の as のもの) B: 赤いのが欲しい。こんなのが欲しい。(の as もの) C: 絵を描くのが好きだ。(の as a nominalizer) D: 彼女は学生なのだ。彼は知っているのだ。(explanatory-の) 準体助詞 is not really a widely used ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
5 votes
Accepted

ぶん after a standard form verb vs ほど or くらい

According to 明鏡国語辞典: ぶん【分】... (語法) 「・・・分(だけ)、・・・」の形で、その程度に応じて他の事柄の程度も進む意を表す。「期待していなかった分、余計にうれしかった」「スピードを上げた分だけ疲れが出た。」 In the format of "~~分(だけ)、~~", it indicates that the degree of something ...
chocolate's user avatar
  • 65.5k
5 votes
Accepted

Can 私の手伝いをするの mean "the help I do"?

One exception of so-called "ga-no conversion" is that you cannot use の in place of が if there is を. Such ~の will be taken not as the subject but as a modifier of the object marked with を. According to ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
5 votes
Accepted

Use of Adjective + のも

I'm familiar with Vのは Then, you understand 暮らすにはいささか苦労が多い のは 難点だ. I think you are familiar with も which means also or too in the sentences as: 「町には人が多い。車も多い。」 "There are a lot of people, also a ...
user20624's user avatar
  • 15.3k
5 votes

Function of particles の and は in this sentence

The の is nominalizing 会えなくなる and its preceding qualifying clause. It might be easier to start from what comes after は. 嫌です So the question becomes what's 嫌です? The は is going to indicate the ...
vel's user avatar
  • 863
5 votes
Accepted

Nominalized verb without の or こと

This is a very important construction called a relative clause. [教]{おし}える[人]{ひと} a person who teaches The rule is described in detail in this question: Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
5 votes

What is the function of のは in this question?

This is an "incomplete" cleft sentence, and that のは is part of the grammar of cleft sentences. Do you understand the following simpler example of cleft sentence used to emphasize the reason? ...
naruto's user avatar
  • 315k
5 votes

Nominalization of です?

i-adjective + である is not grammatical for the same reason i-adjective + だ is not grammatical: i-adjectives already serve as a predicate without need for a copula (or in other words, you can imagine ...
Darius Jahandarie's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What are the grammatical roles of the two のs in the following sentence?

彼はこういうのがうまいのです。 Sounds like you're confused about both の. Let's analyze. Breaking it down First, a literal word-by-word translation. [彼]{"He"  }[は]{[TOPIC]  }[こう]{"like this"  }[...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
5 votes

Problem with choosing のは or は with と思います

The issue of choosing between のは and は has little to nothing to do with と思います. The grammar of these constructs is as follows: <sentence> と思います <noun phrase> は In your first two examples: ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
  • 10k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible