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9

One usage that I was taught and is not mentioned above for んです is to soften a question or statement. For example レストランに 行きたいです I want to go to a restaurant. is a bit demanding or matter-of-fact. Changing to 行きたいんです softens this. Imagine a friend asks you about what you both should do for lunch. 行きたい sounds a bit forceful, like you will consider nothing ...


6

There is a slight difference between 〜かもしれない and 〜なのかもしれない that is really hard to explain, but is nonetheless good to know because in a lot of cases one will be much more natural than the other. One way to look at it might be: X は Y かもしれない → X could be Y X は Y なのかもしれない → It could be that X is Y For example, if you heard someone coming down the chimney on ...


5

Yes, this is a typical example of explanatory-の. Looking at the source, we can see this sentence is trying to explain why the アザラシ was found in the mountain. 川に入ってしまいました。 The animal ended up entering the river. 川に入ってしまったのです。 It is that the animal ended up entering the river. 川に入ってしまったかもしれません。 The animal may have ended up entering the river. ...


3

As you can see in this chart, な in なのよ is the attributive form of だ ("the copula"). And だ/です safely works as the predicate of a sentence. (e.g., 今日は日曜日です, 私は学生です) よ is a feminine sentence-end particle. Here both は and が are used in one sentence, and this can be understood in the same way as you interpret 私は猫が好きだ or 彼は背が高い. 勝負 here is a noun which means the ...


3

ポイントは、「んだよ」と「よね」がいずれもチャンク (chunk) として機能することと、「んだよね」を「んだよ+ね」と「んだ+よね」のいずれに解釈するかです。 お話のインフォーマントの方の解釈は「んだよ+ね」(4a)、つまり、ある文に「ね」がくっついた構造であって、その「ある文」というのが「んだよ」で終わる形、つまり第1の文と同じく話し手の領分の情報を内容とする文なので同じように機能するというわけです。 これを「んだ+よね」と解釈した場合(4b)は、第2の文と同じように相手に尋ねる感じになります。この場合の第2の文との違いは、2が単にそのように推測しているのに対して、4は聞き手の領分のある言動をそのような趣旨、意味合いだと解釈したということになります。なので、4の方が根拠がある感じがします。 「んだ」...


3

Firstly, 食堂の食べ物はあまり好きじゃないだ。 is not grammatical. じゃない cannot be followed by だ in standard Japanese, so the correct version of this sentence with the ん removed would simply be 食堂の食べ物はあまり好きじゃない。 As for the meaning, this is a straightforward ordinary usage of the "explanatory の", so it simply adds a certain explanatory nuance to the statement. A similar effect ...


3

I also would like to add my information gained from my teacher at college. He says while the above explanation describes in great details in what context we use 「んだ」 or 「のだ」, basically it cannot be translated as the expression of cause, basis, conclusion, restatement, or confession. According to his academic research on Japanese language 「んだ」 or 「のだ」only ...


3

Yes たまに means "occasionally." んだ at the end of the sentence is not related to たまに. This んだ is the colloquialism for のだ, which is often called explanatory no(da). In your sentence, んだ is not necessary but used for mild emphasis. Most of the time you don't have to translate this のだ explicitly. Explanatory のだ (んだ) What is the meaning of ~んです? How is the "...


2

So-called "explanatory の" has many functions and it's not a good idea to look for a direct equivalent in English. See this answer and this one, and you can see that の is used way more casually than "because". Using "because" to translate の is sometimes okay, but unacceptable in many cases. ので and から are both "because", which is something you use to ...


2

のです is a constructuon that: asks for or gives an explaination or information (or additional infos) 今日は仕事に行けません。病気なんです。 when you want to be sure that what you imagined or judged from a context is true or not (Someone entering the office with an umbrella) 雨が降っているんですか。 when you express your interpretation or you understand something that wasn’t clear ...


2

I think you did not refer to the right chapter of your textbook. If you have already read the proper explanation about this の, you should know it's mainly for explanation or clarification. Think of this の as a milder version of "that is to say", "because", "I mean", etc. Your first sentence, "クリスマスの前デパートはいつも込んでいるんです。", is not a natural sentence without a ...


2

んです itself doesn't get conjugated, right? んです(≂ のです; particle の + copula です) conjugates to: んです、んでした、んでしょう、(んでして、) -- polite んだ、んだった、んだろう、んで、んなら -- plain And, as with な adjectives, な also gets added after nouns. But how would this work in the past tense? You replace な with だった, as in: 花なんです。→ 花だったんです。


1

道子さんがquotationと言ってたから。 This た is not the copula. 言ってた is a contraction of 言っていた. Where ていた is the past (perfect) form of ている indicating continuation of state. By the way た is never the copula. It would always be だ. みちこさんのうちに行こうと思ってるんだけど、一緒にいかない In this sentence you've already figured out that てる is a contraction of ている (strange how you missed it in the ...


1

Yes, ので is related to のだ. This の sort of means 'thing' or '(the) thing is' in the sense of 'it is the case is that...'. For this reason, the difference between さむい? and さみいの?is that the first is a simple question, whereas the latter implies that you have reason to think that the other person is cold. Perhaps they are wearing a heavy jacket or they asked to ...


1

ので has similar meaning to から in that they can both mean "because, given that..." のだ, or のです are versions of んだ/んです that are more often used in writing and they don't really mean "because", they just imply the speaker or writer is explaining or emphasizing things. It's quite hard to explain, you can read up on it here: https://jlptsensei.com/learn-japanese-...


1

Yes, they are synonymous. In fiction, frequently use of なの is a feature that's unique to girly characters, while in reality men use it too.


1

Questions of のだ forms mean that you are trying to confirm if your judgement from your observation is true or not, opposed to simple questions. For example, simple くれる? means that your are asking someone to give something while くれるの? means that the opponent seems giving it and you are confirming if he's really doing. Negative questions are basically ...


1

The の particle here is the explanation particle, it gives an emphasis and further wish of explaining from the person who answers, I think it makes the question a bit stronger cause you just don't want an answer, you want a proper explanation. パーティーに行かない?(Paatii ni ikanai?) Are you not going to the party? パーティーに行かないの?(Paatii ni ikanai no?) Are you not going ...


1

「から」 ex-1: 雨が降りそうだから、傘を持って行きます。 It looks like rain. I'll take my umbrella. (I'll take my umbrella, because it looks like rain.) 「ので」 ex-2: 雨が降りそうなので、傘を持って行きます。 These two have the same meaning and interchangeable as colloquial expression. 「から」と「ので」にあるわずかな違い There is slight difference between the two. ex-3: 君が『もういらない』って言ったから、あの本は捨てたよ。You said ...


1

First of all, "no" and "n" are same. "no" can become n if there is no stress. "no" is called 準体助詞, which makes a noun phrase from a sentence / an adjective. It is just like "that" in English. "no" itself does not mean confirmation or question. And, rather what comes after "no" adds these meanings. ~ndesu. It is that blah blah. ~ndesuka? Is it that blah ...


1

Both is past tense. The former is a question the latter is an answer (he did it). This topic is similar to this question: のだから vs のだ (んだから vs んだ)


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