8

ちゃう can be used in several completely different ways. Since you mentioned negation, I am certain you are entering the wild and wonderful world of the Osakan dialect. As standard Japanese: [Verb] + "ちゃう" means: (a contraction of て しまう) "go ahead and..." (wasn't sure if you had permission to do so.) (see a delicious-looking cake and) 食べちゃう!...


5

This sentence is a rhetorical question, "Where is the reason why I must not do it?", i.e., "I'm sure I should be allowed to do it". そうしてはならぬ is more common, but this is not a mistype, either. This type of は is optional and often dropped in subordinary clauses. For example, 彼は学生でない sounds awkward, but 学生でない人 is safely interchangeable with ...


5

「座らない」 expresses a feeling of "I'm not going to seat", it talks about the future volition. If you say something like 「座らない人」, you mean the person who won't seat there, talking about future. 「座っていない」 is the negative form of 「座っている」, which talks about the state, if it's seated or not, or if someone is seating or not. As for your question, you should ...


4

For: それ は おそくない くるま です。 the basic sentence is それは くるま です That is a car. But おそくない modifies くるま to give "that is a car which is not slow". For: それ は おそい くるま じゃ ありません。 the basic sentence is それは くるま じゃありません That is not a car But おそい modifies くるま to give "that is not a car which is slow". So the main difference is that in the first ...


3

ちゃう is a contracted form of てしまう. You use てしまう (ちゃう) when you regret something you have done or something has been completed. It doesn’t go well with a non-action like 話さない. Having said that, it can be used for a change that has resulted in that state. The change that results in the state of “not speaking” can be expressed as 話さなくなる. If you regret that ...


3

話さなくている is already ungrammatical without (て)しまう/ちゃう. The correct form is 話していない ("is not talking/telling" or "has not told") or 話さないでいる ("to keep it untold"). There are two ways of combining (て)いる and ない. See: ~ないでいる verb ending and 〜ていない vs 〜ないでいる. Also note that (て)いる has two different meanings (progressive and perfect). To ...


3

歩けん is a variant of 歩けない ("I can't walk"). Usually a small girl doesn't use this form because it sounds a little old-fashioned or dialectal. Maybe the speaker is an old vampire or someone playing the role of it? Is verb ending ない shortened to ん? Verb conjugations such as 思わん、言えん The omission of を is very common in colloquial Japanese. There is ...


2

You have answered your own question. It is indeed short for 練習しなければならない. It is quite clear from the context what the natural conclusion of 練習しなければ is, so there is no need to say it. The more you study Japanese the more of these unfinished sentences you will find. The Japanese seem to have a proclivity for omitting unnecessary information in conversation, but ...


2

Both can be a negative rhetorical question, but are used in different situations. この車は新しくないんですか is "Isn't this car new?" It sounds like they are talking about the age of one specific car. More literally, "As for this car, isn't it new?" この車は新しいんじゃないですか is "Isn't this one a new car?" It sounds like they are finding a new car ...


2

I think you may occasionally hear some ギャル say これ美味しくなくない? when, for example, going to a highly reviewed restaurant, being somewhat disappointed by the food, then asking a friend for affirmation. In normal speech, however, you will quite commonly hear people say double negatives with a particle in between. 美味しくなくはない。 It doesn't taste bad. 忙しくなくはない。 I wouldn'...


2

Yes it is possible. Perhaps it's not clear to you because you are using the formal form, ではありません, and that form cannot be used to modify nouns. If you were to change to the informal ではない or じゃない then things start to look rather like the i-adjective case, right? これは簡単{かんたん}じゃない問題{もんだい}です。 This is a problem which is not simple.


2

You're correct that 何も is a negative polarity item that means "(not) at all". But you seem to have missed せず is a negative verb that roughly means しないで. せず - What does it come from? What is the difference between the negative forms -ず and -ぬ? JLPT N2 Grammar: ずに済む その時々の課題をクリアすることに、全力で取り組んでいる間は、何も思い悩なやんだりせずにすむ。 As long as you put all your energy ...


2

I was hoping someone would find what I haven't been able to find: namely a duplicate of this question. But the only questions/answers I can find are related to various particular scenarios. There are various constructions similar to ...しか...ない in Japanese. Some call these negative polarity items. The linked answer gives some other examples in both ...


1

how is the nai form of a verb related to the verb masu stem It isn't. The "nai form" of a verb is entirely dependent on the "Mizenkei base", whilst the "masu form" of a verb is entirely dependent on the "Ren'yōkei base". Incidentally, the mizenkei base and the ren'yōkei base have the same pattern for ichidan verbs, ...


1

Negative of です can always be ではありません. But here you have to be careful because the notion of "negative" is quite different from what it is in latin-based languages. Like you could ask "what's the negative form of X in German/French/Italian" and you could get some usable information in real life from the answer you might get, but that's not ...


1

Let's break 予報外れの雨が降った into its two basic parts. The core sentence is just 雨が降った, "It rained." And so any translation should reflect that this is the underlying sentence. The second part is 予報外れ. This does mean "the forecast got it wrong". However, it's actually not a sentence; it's a noun phrase. A rendering that would better reflect ...


1

After I spend more time with this question and read lots of article and watched few videos I found the answer. So て-form has many usage, but we are only interested in the connecting fuction which has the following cases: expressing the chronological order of actions: in this case we just connecting/linking verbs in chronological order, but no logical ...


1

As you interpret, 見て行く means see sth here before go away. 見て行く works like one word, so negating ない could be added after it. e.g.見ていかなくてもいいの But also you can divide it and say 見ないで行ってもいいの. For me 見て行かなくても sounds by far more natural but 見ないで行っても would be barely OK.


1

From a grammatical point of view you can make double or triple or whatever-iple negations, though it's not something you'd throw in a normal conversation. As an example from Ace Attorney: -そんなことないよ。 -そんなことなくないッ! -そんなことなくなくない! -そんなことなくなくなくなくなく... With exception of comic effect I hardly can imagine situation where you may need this.


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