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15 votes

How would a fluent speaker understand ありがとうございません?

It's not common at all and I don't remember whether I've heard it in my entire life, but ありがとうございません is not gibberish, and it could pass as a meaningful wordplay to describe ありがた迷惑 if used in an ...
naruto's user avatar
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13 votes
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Verb ending in -ん with positive meaning?

That ん isn't a shortening of ぬ, it's a shortening of the auxiliary む. According to Classical Japanese rules, the negative ~ぬ is the 連体形 of ~ず. This means it is used to modify nouns. In particular, ...
Ringil's user avatar
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11 votes

How would a fluent speaker understand ありがとうございません?

While it’s not impossible to interpret, it is unusual (far more than “thanks, but no thanks”). This is mainly because the grammatical construction of 〜うございます is mostly no longer productive and ...
Darius Jahandarie's user avatar
11 votes
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Natural way of saying "I don't think X"

I don't think it's sold at the normal grocery store. 普通のスーパーで売っているとは思いません。 I think it's not sold at the normal grocery store. 普通のスーパーでは売っていないと思います。 Both are correct sentences, and they convey the ...
naruto's user avatar
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10 votes
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Omission of く in negative form of い-adjective

There are at least three types of omission of く, which should be distinguished. The "traditional western" euphoric change is called ウ音便 and is described in this question, this one and a chart in this ...
naruto's user avatar
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10 votes
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How does 一回だって in this sentence mean "not even once" when there's no negative?

The だって in your example means: だって 🈩〘副助〙 ❹《最小を表す語に付いて、下に打ち消しの語を伴って》全面的否定を表す。…も。 「こんな会社は一日だって我慢できない」 「わずかだってミスは許されない」 (明鏡国語辞典) Used in this sense, だって(≈も) is always followed by negation. eg 「...
chocolate's user avatar
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9 votes
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Origin of ません (-masen)?

According to Shogakukan's big 国{こく}語{ご}大{だい}辞{じ}典{てん}, the verb ending -masu ultimately derived from a combination of humble polite auxiliary verb 参{まい}る plus the verb する, as a shift from either &#...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
8 votes
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Is な used for emphasis or negative imperative in this sentence?

「おまえ、そんな体験したこともねぇのにわかったようなこと言うなっ」 How can I know? When it's spoken, you could easily tell the difference by the pitch accent: わかったようなこと[言うな]{LHL} ← negative imperative わかったようなこと[言うな]{LHH} ← mild ...
chocolate's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why does 不甲斐{ふがい}ない mean "worthless" while 甲斐{かい} means "worth"?

不甲斐ない was originally 腑甲斐ない. 腑 is an uncommon kanji meaning "gut." According to this article, 腑甲斐ない was much more commonly used by novelists in the Meiji and Taisho periods. According to this ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes
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Conjugate る-ending verbs into negative form

There are generally 3 categories of verbs, and their names depend on which textbook you use. There are Type 1 (五段), Type 2 (一段), and Irregular verbs. The conjugation for negative form for Type 1 ...
Flaw's user avatar
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8 votes
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What is the nuanced function of 何ひとつ in a negated sentence?

This 何ひとつ is a negative polarity item. This means 何ひとつ is always followed by a negative expression, and 何ひとつ by itself is an intensifier. You asked about "何ひとつ in a negative sentence", but ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes

て form of past negative sentence with ちゃう

ちゃう can be used in several completely different ways. Since you mentioned negation, I am certain you are entering the wild and wonderful world of the Osakan dialect. As standard Japanese: [Verb] + &...
Jun Sato's user avatar
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7 votes
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必ずしも within this sentence

I think that 必ずしも is like 必ず but just used for negative sentences. I am pretty sure that 必ずしも must be used with a negative verb, which inevitably makes it mean "not always". It is the fact that it is ...
stack reader's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is the correct grammar for "neither x nor y"?

A: 僕は学生でもないし、先生でもない。 B: 僕は学生でもなく、先生でもない。 C: 僕は学生でもなければ、先生でもない。 D: 僕は学生でも、先生でもない。 what is the correct grammar for "... neither x nor y ..." in Japanese? I think 「~も~もない」「~もないし~もない」「~もなく~もない」「~...
chocolate's user avatar
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7 votes

difference between -なくて and -ないで

Technically, ないで is a way of saying don't, or without doing. You can look up more about it here. ない has some behaviors that are similar to those of ~い adjectives. ~なくて is akin to putting a comma at ...
ajsmart's user avatar
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7 votes
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Help understanding せんで?

It is the negative て form of the verb する. This is common in many dialects and not just Kansai. It is the standard way of speaking on Kyushu. Note that the conjugation in question can be used for two ...
a20's user avatar
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7 votes
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~すまいて after a verb

まい is a somewhat old word with an approximate meaning similar to ~ないだろう (here). You may or may not have heard the phrase ~じゃあるまいし. It attaches straight after the dictionary form of godan verbs, and ...
Angelos's user avatar
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7 votes
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A hat salesman asks 「帽子を買いませんか?」. Is this an invitation, or a negative question?

Both (a) and (b) are correct. There is no such rule that ~しませんか always implies "together". 買いませんか is typically a simple suggestion, "Why don't you buy it?" But depending on the ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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How do these negations differ? (Plain negative vs. potential negative)

[帰]{かえ}れる is the potential form of 帰る. So this means "It's true, Hibiki. It's not that we just didn't come [or go] back, it's that we couldn't come back". Presumably the speaker is explaining to ...
Graham Healey's user avatar
6 votes
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Which is stronger, ないでほしい or てほしくない

Both are rather simply using ほしい, and I personally do not think there is a clear difference in the level of forcefulness. The literal translation of these two sentences are different also in English: ...
naruto's user avatar
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Pitch Accent for ~ない and ~たい

Whilst there aren't many online resources for this sort of thing, there are very extensive paper resources. I highly recommend that you get either the NHK日本語発音アクセント辞典 or the 新明解日本語アクセント辞典 if you have ...
Mayerling's user avatar
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6 votes
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Most natural way to use the negative with つもり

They have different structures as you've translated, and both forms are used as often as the other unlike English. If I reword them to be clearer: 食べないつもりです = I have an intention that: "I'm not going ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
6 votes
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Having trouble making sense of the sentence "解いてから帰らないとすっきりしないんだ"

The と is a normal conditional と. The scope of the negation (~ない) is the whole 解いてから帰る, not just 帰る. I think you can think of it this way: [解いてから帰(る)]+ ないと、すっきりしないんだ → If I don't do "解いてから帰る"...
chocolate's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is 「してはならないとさしとめる」 a double negative?

This と is for quoting. So it's equivalent to: 「してはならない」と差し止める Or "prohibiting from doing, saying 'you can't do that'".
Gui Imamura's user avatar
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6 votes

めったに without a negative?

This is a rhetorical question where the implied meaning is negative. The actual message here is そんな人は滅多にいない. Therefore, even though there is no explicit negation in the sentence, I feel this sentence ...
naruto's user avatar
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