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12

Lyrics in most Japanese songs do not rhyme at the end of each line. Only some J-pop songs influenced by the western culture actively use rhymes. Japanese hip hop songs tend to use rhymes often. For example, lyrics written by Rhymester usually contain a lot of rhymes, as the name suggests :) Listen to this song, and I believe you can easily feel the rhymes ...


11

演奏していて楽しい曲 doesn't sound overly formal to me, but you can also say やっていて楽しい曲 or 弾【ひ】いていて楽しい曲. The generic word you can use with 楽器 is 弾く (i.e., 楽器を弾く). A drummer won't complain if you ask this to multiple members in a band simultaneously. When you want to include a vocalist, too, probably やる is the only possible choice. 奏でる would sound needlessly poetic when ...


8

ターアー(𝅗𝅥)・タン(♩)・タ(♪)・タカ(♫) is arguably the most widely-used system for describing rhythms, and this particularly goes well with percussion instruments. I think this is basically a simplified version of "takatiki" in the article you linked. Japanese is mora-based, and some teachers take advantage of the fact. いち・に・さん・し is very common for ラジオ体操 and such where ...


8

Most native speakers haven't heard いやほい before this song. When an announcer asked the lyricist about this word on Nov/11/2015, he said something along the lines of "The meaning is not known and each person has their own way of interpreting it". So it's basically his made-up word which just sounded nice to him. Still, I feel this is meant to sound like a ...


7

This refers to the base pitch of the instrument. 調子 refers to the tuning of an instrument, and the number is the type of tuning. Each number represents a semitone increase above the base key of low F, with F being 1. So if you have a 六本調子, you have a Bb flute (F F# G G# A Bb (A#)). The others change accordingly. On a side note, there is a word 一本調子 that ...


6

I know a children's song, かえるのうた (The Frog's Song, The Frog Song) I'm not sure if you'd classify it as a lullaby, but it has a simple melody and can even be sung in a round (I think of it as the Japanese "Row, Row, Row your Boat") Here's a link: Frog Song Note: There seems to be a regional difference where the line "Gero gero gero gero" is replaced with "...


5

Isn't it just a 'call'? Like "yahooo!" or "hey hey!" ... at least, that's the sense with which I take sounds like that one. Basically that would mean they're saying "hi" to Harajuku in an uber-genki way. I know that やっほー! is such a sound, and this seems fairly close to that, with extra "cuteness" added in.


5

It makes little sense by itself. This phrasing (ab)uses artistic license to a great degree, so I doubt I can bring up a nearly literal translation that conveys the nuance. Grammatically explained, the first part 凛として is "being dignified/frigid" (凛 is literally like "cold and contracted", and figuratively refers to "unapproachable stylishness"), an adverbial ...


4

Yes using 貴様 can be a joke, but I believe it's not used as a joke here. Judging from the whole lyrics, I can say the lyricist used several "dirty words" intentionally for some reason. ヘンタイ 犬猫畜生 ブチこむ So this 貴様 is simply there to show the person's high pride or arrogant attitude. Such words frequently appear especially in heavy metal music. By the way 貴様 ...


4

まず第一に、「紛れもなく原爆」と言えるほどのはっきりとした描写ではないと思います。言われないとほとんど誰も気づかないと思います。原爆の歌だと言われても、まだ解釈が難しいです。 Sundomeは恐らく原爆ドームのことでしょう。 「黒い朝日を描く」「白い絵の具」とは、人影の石やはしごと監視兵の写真の黒い部分と白い部分を指しているのかもしれません。「利き腕が昨日と違う」も関係していそうですが、よくわかりません。 あるいは「黒い朝日」は原爆の爆発自体を指しているのかもしれません。原爆のfalloutが混じった雨を、俗称で黒い雨と呼ぶので、原爆というと「黒」というイメージはあります。 「1秒を奪われた」は、上記の写真の人々が、死ぬことに気づく時間もなく死んでしまったことを指しているのだと思います。教科書に載っている、...


3

I don't think there's anything particularly wrong with a phrase such as 音楽を掛けましょうか。 It isn't wrong but it is pretty broad. It works, though, if the type of music, artist, or song don't matter. In more explicit cases, you could substitute 音楽 for something else. For example: 音楽を掛けましょうか。 Shall I play some music (from a device)? ...can be changed to ...


3

It reads: "[撥]{ばち}の[音]{おと}も[加]{くわ}えたgliss". This literally means: "The sound of drumsticks"-too "added to"-gliss, and in translation: Glissando complemented by the sound of drumsticks. It seems a bit rendundant, knowing that a Marimba would only allow for discrete glissando.


3

「利き腕が昨日と違うから 上手に握手出来ない」と「一秒を奪われた(永遠になった)」でわかります。 このYAHOO知恵袋で語られてる通り、原爆によって壁などが人の陰になった部分を残して黒く焼け焦げることで鏡像の人影ができます。これが「利き腕が昨日とちがう…」とか「一秒を奪われた」ということになります。 歌詞の全体的な概念は私にはわかりません。 (あと、「気に障るつもりはない」とはどういうことでしょうか?「気に障ったら申し訳ないが…」ということでしょうか?)


3

The German Fuchs, Du hast die Gans gestohlen is the original song. (The modern version is due to Ernst Anschütz (1824).) The Japanese 『小ぎつね』 (or 小ぎつねこんこん) is a version by 勝【かつ】 承夫【よしお】 Yoshio Katsu, first listed in the textbook 『三年生の音楽』 "Music for the third grade" published in 1947 by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. The song is still ...


3

I think it is because we don't have an exact version of the R present in Japanese, which is somewhere between L and R. When I was learning English I couldn't tell the difference between beach and b**ch, which proved to be quite comedic, however, the point is sounds are unique for each language. Our brain will interpret them as the closest thing we know, ...


3

As naruto mentioned, "演奏する" sounds like a perfectly reasonable candidate, and is not too formal. Another option is to use the "演" of "演奏"; "演じる". This is however perhaps most commonly used in regards to theatrical pieces, such as opera and plays.


2

"貴様" is sometimes used in lyrics. In the Japanese Middle Ages "貴様" was used as a respectful form, actually "貴" means "distinction" and "様" means "Mr. or Sir." So conversationally "貴様" is a very rude form. 貴様に何が分かるか! I bet you'll never know! However in the lyrics "貴様" is used indicating close relationship. The most famous lyrics with "貴様" is "同期の桜" as "...


2

Regarding why you find different lyrics in different places - this is pretty much true for most folk songs in most languages, either due to regional variants or improvisation. For example, famous songs such as "Drunken Sailor" often have various additional/optional verses. In this specific case, the Japanese wikipedia article on 鰊場作業唄 describes the format ...


1

I think your understanding is spot on :) In terms of whether it’s a ‘correct’ translation (if such a thing does exist), you should think about the purpose of the translation. I know you said you were doing this for fun, but I think it’s worthwhile to think about it in any case! (Without going into it, there are other approaches/paradigms/theories of ...


1

You seem to be on the right track. Seeing as it is more of a fun activity song for children, it most likely carries no deep meaning, so "hoi" in this context could be a "hey" or "yeah"


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