12

(I know what "から" and the sentence-ending "か" mean, but not this) Yes, it's this から followed by this か. から here is a reason/cause marker. か is a question marker but is used like "presumably" or "probably" here. And 興奮 is "excitement", not "doubtful interest". 興奮: excitement 興奮から: due to his excitement, ... 興奮からか: presumably due to his excitement, ...; ...


7

You should think of this like から+か. If there wasn't a か, the following would just be a statement of a fact. The から is used to give the reason for the unusual fluency of the foreigner (in this case it is because the foreigner was excited/agitated). 興奮から銀髪の外国人の口調は、いつになく流暢だった。 With the か, the speaker is no longer certain for the reason. The speaker is now ...


6

いかん in this sentence means "no good", "of no use", "it sucks", etc. It's adding the speaker's feeling about the mentioned fact (左右される). いかん is almost a lexicalized expression, and it is also used like English "oops", "don't do it" or "oh my gosh". It sounds a little pompous or dialectal. Related: What does ても+いかん do? Meaning of いかんしょ in following sentence ...


6

くれりゃ is a colloquial, contracted pronunciation of くれれば. For this kind of contraction, see this thread: What is the meaning of りゃ in this phrase? 注文してくれれば breaks down to... 注文して -- "order", the て-form of the する-verb 「注文する」 くれれば* -- "if you do ~~ (for me)", the conditional form of the subsidiary verb 「くれる」 (*ば is a conjunctive particle) For more ...


5

This is one of the Seven Wonders of English Education in Japan of which my poor English is a product. Long story short, I can guarantee as an average native Japanese-speaker that 「~~ほうがいい」 is closer in both meaning and nuance to "should" than to "had better". I was taught the complete opposite in junior high school in Japan (I was indeed taught "had ...


2

First, the -う at the end of だろう and でしょう is an auxiliary verb that used to have a broader function. Now it is mainly used to express intent (〜(よ)うと思う) and make propositions (行こう or 食べよう), but up until the Edo period it also expressed uncertainty and conjecture. You can perhaps see how uncertainty, intent and proposition are conceptually related as they all ...


1

I think the wall that you might be hitting when trying to incorporate ように in your translation of たしか、殴られて気を失ったように思う。 is that you are incorrectly interpreting ように with a 目的(結果)meaning instead of a 推量 meaning. The phrasing you used in your second translation, "in order to remember," hints that you might be interpreting ように with a 目的(結果)meaning like it is ...


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