9

First, yes, 〜ないといけない is a grammatical phrase, usually translated as "must" or "have to". Correspondingly, it will usually be written in hiragana rather than kanji. Second, your confusion is totally natural; I think a lot of Japanese learners will come across constructions with a couple of negatives and a conditional in the mix and wonder how to parse it... ...


7

-ないと doesn't indicate "must", but -ないといけない does (the 行 also usually wouldn't be written in kanji in this case, either). It's one of a few set phrases that just mean "must", and are pretty automatic when that's what you want to express. Some similar patterns that work the same way are: それをしないとならない それをしなくてはダメ Instead of using -ないと, you can also use -なければ or -...


6

As a native Kansai-an I have to point out: the natural way to say it is: (a) 火遊びしたら危ないで! (b) 火遊びしたらアカンで! It'd be odd to say "しちゃあかんで" as you don't say しちゃ in Kansai dialect. ”してもうたら” has a slightly different meaning and shouldn't be used in this case. "してもうたら" is used to describe the consequence of an action, e.g. 火遊びしてもうたらもう許してもらえへんで ...


2

This use of た is called modal-ta or 発見のタ. There are a number of questions related to this on this site. Non conventional usage of the past tense "fixing (or updating) one's previous knowledge/expectation" seems to be the key Usage of plain i-adjectives or た form (悪かったv悪い、良かったvいい etc) It is used when one's expectation has just matched or failed ...


2

In such cases, there are two relevant differences to consider: is a piece of information known to the speaker or not? who does the information come from? In the first scenario, in which two co-workers talk about a conference, B already knew that a conference was to take place on that particular day. They simply seem to have forgotten and are now re-...


1

っての is というの, and が is a plain subject marker. So it's basically like this: "I'd make it if it were something I can make" is ... This is an incomplete sentence, and the corresponding predicate is missing. Maybe you've missed the remaining part of this sentence in the following page, or maybe the predicate of this sentence can be inferred from the ...


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