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35

Yes, you are correct that 中 (ちゅう) in this case means "in the middle of ~ ". For your sentence, the simple translation "downloading" is probably the most natural. It is fairly common to combine a noun with the suffix 中(ちゅう) to express the idea of the "currently in the process of (NOUN)". A few examples of NOUN + 中: 保留{ほりゅう} deferment, holding:  保留中{...


22

yes, you read 中 as ちゅう , and 中3 as ちゅうさん 中3 is a shorthand way of writing 中学校3年生 which is (Japanese) Junior High School 3rd graders or in other words, 9th graders. so 中3の25% would be "25% of (Japanese) 9th graders" so the full translation of 「中3の25%、短文も理解困難」 is "Twenty-five percent of 9th graders have difficulty understanding short passages." ...


18

There is no semantic difference when they mean "to wake up (e.g., in the morning)", but 目覚める sounds more bookish and literary. In the most casual settings, people usually say 起きる or 目を覚ます. In addition, each has derivative meanings: 目を覚ます also means "to regain one's sense", "to recover from illusion", "to notice one believed in something wrong". 目覚める also ...


16

「コテッ(と)」 is an onomatopoeia used to describe a sudden and/or quick lean or fall to one side by an object. 'Thus, 「コテッと首{くび}をかしげる」 means "to put one's head on one side". 「コテッと」 would not necessarily need to be translated here. We have another 「コテッ(と)」 that describes a food item, which means "very oily". These are two different onomatopoeias that happen to ...


15

「[Noun] + 仕立{した}て」 means: "(made) in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not sure: https://www....


14

It means "I'm not good with alcohol" or "I don't like alcohol". Of course it can also mean "Alcohol is not good (for your health)" and "Alcohol is prohibited (in this event)", depending on the context. In general, ~がダメだ can mean "to be not good at ~" or "not to like ~". For example you can say サッカーはダメです, 彼は英語がダメです, etc.


14

"Distraction" isn't really a very good translation of 憂さ晴らし. The word refers specifically to the act of doing something to take your mind off your own troubles (eg. drinking to distract yourself from the stress of work). It's kind of like "letting off steam". You can derive this meaning fairly easily from its component parts - 憂さ is a fancy word for "sadness"...


13

しかたない is a negative phrase, and it does imply some dissatisfaction, disappointment, etc. All the English translations you have found seem fine to me. In your last example, the speaker clearly dislikes the fact that the tablet takes 10 minutes to have an effect. Etymologically, 仕方【しかた】 is "way (of doing something)" or "choice", and ない is "there is no ~". So "...


13

「のそ」 is an onomatopoeic word describing a slow walk, slow body movements, etc. We also use 「のそのそ」 and 「のそりのそり」. You can forget "a moment later" for good.


13

The verb is 捨てる, so its て-form is 捨てて, hence the compound form Vて+しまう becomes 捨ててしまう. If it were the casual ちゃう instead of しまう that you were using, that starts from the て-form too, but also contracts the て, so it would instead be 捨てちゃう, with just the one て. Perhaps that is where the confusion arose? Hope that helps!


13

でも うちで売ってるアイスじゃないんじゃないかしら 「~じゃないかしら。」「~じゃないかな。」 can mean "I suspect..." "I think..." "Isn't it...?" うちで売ってるアイス means "ice cream that's sold in our shop". (うちで売ってる is a relative clause that modifies アイス.) So the sentence basically means... "But, it is not the ice cream that we sell, is it?" "But, I think it is not the ice cream that we sell."


12

てことは is a more informal version of ということは, which means "That is to say ..." or "What this means is ...". 梃子【てこ】 ("lever") is not relevant as all. て (or って in the middle of a sentence) is a colloquial particle that works like と or という. て/という refers to what has been mentioned in the previous context. You may have seen sentences that start with という, like in ...


12

オシャレ is also spelled お洒落. This breaks down to honorific prefix o- + share, the stem of the verb shareru, "to dress up, to get fancy, to be stylish, to be refined", or even "to be witty" in terms of how one speaks. This could be used as a noun, or indeed as a -na adjective, like in your sample text. You may have heard the term dajare for "stupid joke": ...


12

I know さ as a way to nominalize a noun. I'm assuming you mean a way to nominalise an adjective. And that's what we have here. [煙]{けむ}い is an adjective meaning 'smoky'. So [煙]{けむ}さ is the nominalised version meaning 'smokiness'. Could you omit さ without changing the meaning? I guess it's not quite the same, but that's a bit too subtle for my language skills....


12

According to 明鏡国語辞典: すくなくとも【少なくとも】〘副〙 ❶ 少なく見積もっても。最低限でも。少なくも。「経費は少なくとも百万円かかる」 ❷ ほかのことはさておき、せめて。「少なくともこれだけは実行してほしい」 ◈(表現) 副詞の「少なくとも」の意で「少なくても」というのは慣用になじまない。 「×少なくても/○少なくとも5人は必要だ(副詞の例)」 「予算は○少なくても/○少なくとも、精いっぱいやろう(副詞ではない例)」 It says 少なくとも as an adverb is not interchangeable with 少なくても. I think 少なくとも cannot be replaced with 少なくても in examples like: ...


12

Adjectives can often be used 'adverbially' (though they are generally not analysed by Japanese grammarians as 副詞) by adding に rather than な or in this case の.


12

I think you answered your own question. 中{ちゅう} is a suffix that means "in the middle of". e.g. 道路は工事中だ The road is in the middle of construction.


12

「かけ」 vs. 「つけ」 Those are two of the more common serving styles of udon. 「かけ」 comes in one (large) bowl with both the broth and noodles in it. With 「つけ」, the noodles and broth are served separately for you to do your "dipping and dunking". You get the noodles in a dish or shallow bamboo basket and the broth in a small bowl/cup. That bamboo basket is ...


11

The short answer is "it is gibberish". It's not a Japanese word Japanese people recognize. It indeed looks like plefectanswer, as snailboat pointed out in the comment section. See also: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? But each kanji is easy and has at least some positive meaning. So if you separate each kanji with a nakaguro and write the phrase ...


10

可愛い has a wide variety of meanings, but in your case it probably means "adorable", "innocent", "docile" or "childlike". For example, if a 9-year-old boy refuses to help his mom after saying a sarcastic and argumentative remark about money, that can be 可愛くない.


10

It's not どうなちきつたんだよオ but どうなっちまったんだよォ, which in this context roughly means "What happened to you!" or "What has become of you!" I don't know how much you know about Japanese, but assuming you can read most of what's written in AKIRA, here's the breakdown. (If you still have trouble reading hiragana, you should start with something easier.) どう: "how" なっちまった: ...


10

Without なら in that sentence, literally it still means "I have been to Chile, but not Brazil." But, the other party will be confused and think to himself, "I'm not asking about Chile, I'm asking about Brazil". If you add なら, it adds the nuance or context that Chile is somehow related to Brazil in some way. Maybe because the culture or language is similar? ...


10

仮定 is close to "hypothesis", and it is can be used with something unlikely or even impossible. 想定 is close to "anticipation", "expectation" or sometimes "assumption". It is usually used when you vividly imagine or anticipate something, or when you do a serious planning/drill/training on the assumption of something. 今、大地震が起きたと仮定したらまずどうしますか。 [?] 今、...


10

In modern casual exchanges, 水気 is almost always read みずけ, and I would say you can practically forget すいき. みずけ is a fairly common word, but people probably don't understand you if you said すいき in conversations. That being said, すいき was not rare at least in old novels. According to ふりがな文庫 (a corpus based on furigana in public-domain old novels), both すいき and ...


9

The small writing is called furigana in Japanese, and is also known as ruby text in English. These are provided as phonetic guides to show the pronunciations of the bigger characters. Furigana are written out in kana, the phonetic Japanese syllabaries (a syllabary is like an alphabet, but each character represents a whole syllable). There are two kinds of ...


9

Yes this 切れる is the potential form of 切る, which means "completely". See also: Is there any difference in meaning between 「抜け切る」 and 「抜ける」? 甘さを自覚した三浦くん means "Miura-kun who is aware of his (own) sweetness". This 甘さ is 考えの甘さ. The sentence is not saying "sweet side of Miura-kun" (三浦くんの甘さ). If you are still not good at relative clauses, please review its ...


9

In this context 普通に means "just ~", "plainly ~", "simply ~", "~ in its plain sense" or "not in a tricky way but in a straightforward manner". This usage is relatively new and many people see it as slangy, if not incorrect. 結構 is different because 普通に嬉しい is about the type/quality of joy whereas 結構嬉しい is about the degree of joy. You can also say 普通においしい which ...


9

お[戯]{たわむ}れを is mainly heard in samurai dramas. Typically, a samurai or a maid says this to their master in the sense of "You must be joking" or "You're not serious, are you?" In dramas set in modern Japan, an old butler- or detective-like character may say this, too. A more common equivalent in modern Japanese is ご冗談を. EDIT: You may be wondering which verb ...


9

No, it's not redundant. (Neither is 大勢の人々, for that matter.) While 大勢 means a crowd, generally of the human variety, it usually appears as a modifier rather than on its own. It can modify more specific nouns than just 人, too. So you can have a large family (大勢の家族) or a mob of visitors (大勢の客). It also works with group nouns (like 大勢の集まり) and modified nouns (...


9

気楽な corresponds to 気が楽 and describes feeling at ease or relaxed, a semi-literal translation of the latter might be "ease of mind". "Easy" itself has several meanings in English, and "easy to drink" would not necessarily be interpreted as meaning the opposite of "technically difficult to drink". In any case, translating 気楽なお酒 as an "easy drink" would be ...


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