Hot answers tagged

36

Yes, you are correct that 中 (ちゅう) in this case means "in the middle of ~ ". For your sentence, the simple translation "downloading" is probably the most natural. It is fairly common to combine a noun with the suffix 中(ちゅう) to express the idea of the "currently in the process of (NOUN)". A few examples of NOUN + 中: 保留{ほりゅう} deferment, holding:  保留中{...


33

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


19

「先{さき}」 here means "the future", "the future events/developments", etc. 「先が気になる」 therefore means "(I am) curious about the future develpments". 「さき{HL}」 refers to a past event. 「先の国会{こっかい}」 ("the last national assembly") 「さき{LH}」 refers to a future event. 「先が気になる」 Native speakers would never say 「先が気になる」 to refer to a past event. We do say, however, 「...


18

There is no semantic difference when they mean "to wake up (e.g., in the morning)", but 目覚める sounds more bookish and literary. In the most casual settings, people usually say 起きる or 目を覚ます. In addition, each has derivative meanings: 目を覚ます also means "to regain one's sense", "to recover from illusion", "to notice one believed in something wrong". 目覚める also ...


18

Though 温度 is a generic word for temperature, we prefer the specific 気温 "air temperature" everyday when we mention the weather, in conversation or in forecast. Same for 水温 of water, 体温 of body, 室温 of room etc. Especially, it'd almost sound like a joke if you described someone 温度が低い instead of 体温が低い (a languid person??). In my impression, 温度 is only preferred ...


18

If the question "May I pet the dog?" means "May I stroke the dog gently?", then none of the phrases you obtained from your sources look good. 「可愛{かわい}がる」 is the closest if not very good. The other two 「飼{か}う」 and 「ペットにする」 are simply out of the question. My own recommendations as a Japanese-speaker would be: 「軽{かる}くなでてもいいですか。」 「ちょっとなでてもいいですか。」 ...


17

I do not know of a monolectic term for that though there might exist one. The polylectic term that should be understood by virtually all adult native Japanese speakers would be 「日本語{にほんご}からの借用語{しゃくようご}」. By inserting 「[language name] + における」 in front of the term above, you can safely and unambiguously say "word(s) borrowed from Japanese (used in [language ...


16

「コテッ(と)」 is an onomatopoeia used to describe a sudden and/or quick lean or fall to one side by an object. 'Thus, 「コテッと首{くび}をかしげる」 means "to put one's head on one side". 「コテッと」 would not necessarily need to be translated here. We have another 「コテッ(と)」 that describes a food item, which means "very oily". These are two different onomatopoeias that happen to ...


15

「[Noun] + 仕立{した}て」 means: "(made) in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not sure: https://www....


15

check out this excerpt from 大辞林第三版 on ませ ませ( 助動 ) 〔丁寧の助動詞「ます」の命令形〕 ① 「いらっしゃる」「おっしゃる」「くださる」「なさる」「申す」「召す」などの動詞の連用形に付いて,相手に対して,その動作をするようにという要求を,丁寧の気持ちを含めて言い表す。 「くれぐれも御自愛くださいませ」 「十分お気をつけなさいませ」 ② 挨拶(あいさつ)の語句に用いて,語調を丁寧にする。 「お帰りなさいませ」 〔② は,元来,「よくお帰りなさいました」のような言い方の省略した形「お帰りなさい」を,命令の言い方と混同して,それに「ます」の命令形「ませ」を付けて,丁寧な気持ちを添えようとしたところからできたもの〕 → まし(助動) ・ ます(助動) We ...


15

That’s likely not a kanji, but rather a hiragana そ (so) in its split/handwritten form (like on the right here):


14

でも うちで売ってるアイスじゃないんじゃないかしら 「~じゃないかしら。」「~じゃないかな。」 can mean "I suspect..." "I think..." "Isn't it...?" うちで売ってるアイス means "ice cream that's sold in our shop". (うちで売ってる is a relative clause that modifies アイス.) So the sentence basically means... "But, it is not the ice cream that we sell, is it?" "But, I think it is not the ice cream that we sell."


14

みてー is a contracted form of みたい ("is like ~"). It's an instance of /ai/-to-/ee/ contraction. 上げて is the te-form of 上げる, and 落とす is a verb. Therefore a very literal translation is "It's like I raised it and then dropped it". 上げて落とす is a slangy expression which may be called an idiom. It roughly means "to set someone's expectations and then disappoint them", "...


14

早口 is a noun or no-/na-adjective that just means "talking rapidly". To use it adverbially, 早口に喋る and 早口で喋る are both okay. Among the three bullets you gave, 早口 covers only the first one. It doesn't mean someone won't shut up, either. To describe a fast-talking salesman, よく口が回る is a set phrase that has a mild negative connotation. 舌が回る is equally common and ...


13

しかたない is a negative phrase, and it does imply some dissatisfaction, disappointment, etc. All the English translations you have found seem fine to me. In your last example, the speaker clearly dislikes the fact that the tablet takes 10 minutes to have an effect. Etymologically, 仕方【しかた】 is "way (of doing something)" or "choice", and ない is "there is no ~". So "...


13

「のそ」 is an onomatopoeic word describing a slow walk, slow body movements, etc. We also use 「のそのそ」 and 「のそりのそり」. You can forget "a moment later" for good.


13

The verb is 捨てる, so its て-form is 捨てて, hence the compound form Vて+しまう becomes 捨ててしまう. If it were the casual ちゃう instead of しまう that you were using, that starts from the て-form too, but also contracts the て, so it would instead be 捨てちゃう, with just the one て. Perhaps that is where the confusion arose? Hope that helps!


13

「こんばんみ」 is a greeting presumably created and definitely made popular by comedian ビビる大木 a couple of decades ago. As always, some people like to mimic whatever schtick they hear on TV that they find "cool" or simply "new". 「こんばんみ」 was even more popular a decade or two ago than it is now. I was a bit surprised to hear you still hear/see it often enough. ...


12

Adjectives can often be used 'adverbially' (though they are generally not analysed by Japanese grammarians as 副詞) by adding に rather than な or in this case の.


12

I think you answered your own question. 中{ちゅう} is a suffix that means "in the middle of". e.g. 道路は工事中だ The road is in the middle of construction.


12

「かけ」 vs. 「つけ」 Those are two of the more common serving styles of udon. 「かけ」 comes in one (large) bowl with both the broth and noodles in it. With 「つけ」, the noodles and broth are served separately for you to do your "dipping and dunking". You get the noodles in a dish or shallow bamboo basket and the broth in a small bowl/cup. That bamboo basket is ...


11

The short answer is "it is gibberish". It's not a Japanese word Japanese people recognize. It indeed looks like plefectanswer, as snailboat pointed out in the comment section. See also: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? But each kanji is easy and has at least some positive meaning. So if you separate each kanji with a nakaguro and write the phrase ...


11

Here 上がり is connected not to 床 but to 呼吸(が). 呼吸が上がる is a set phrase meaning "to be out of breath". 息が上がる and 息が切れる mean the same. Perhaps it's related to the thirteenth definition here. The masu-stem is used to connect two verbs (you know how this works because you asked about it before). 筋力トレーニングを、呼吸が上がり床に這いつくばるまで繰り返す。 (Someone) repeats the muscle ...


10

Without なら in that sentence, literally it still means "I have been to Chile, but not Brazil." But, the other party will be confused and think to himself, "I'm not asking about Chile, I'm asking about Brazil". If you add なら, it adds the nuance or context that Chile is somehow related to Brazil in some way. Maybe because the culture or language is similar? ...


10

仮定 is close to "hypothesis", and it is can be used with something unlikely or even impossible. 想定 is close to "anticipation", "expectation" or sometimes "assumption". It is usually used when you vividly imagine or anticipate something, or when you do a serious planning/drill/training on the assumption of something. 今、大地震が起きたと仮定したらまずどうしますか。 [?] 今、...


10

The kanji spellings are directly borrowed from China, so it's Chinese that call them so. Cucurbits are originally tropical plants, thus they were all imported to East Asia at some points of history. 西瓜 suggests that it came from Western Regions, and 南瓜 from Southeast Asia. As they are tropical plants, 北瓜 shouldn't exist logically, but according to a Chinese ...


10

In modern casual exchanges, 水気 is almost always read みずけ, and I would say you can practically forget すいき. みずけ is a fairly common word, but people probably don't understand you if you said すいき in conversations. That being said, すいき was not rare at least in old novels. According to ふりがな文庫 (a corpus based on furigana in public-domain old novels), both すいき and ...


10

奇数 is an ancient Chinese word, and it is unlikely to be a calque (translation) of the English word odd number. A 2nd century dictionary 説文解字 already has an entry: 奇:異也。一曰不耦。 奇: 1. strange. 2. not paired. 奇 "odd" and 偶 (耦) "even" are historically mainly technical terms in Chinese cleromancy 易占, but it has a long history of use. But beware that this 奇 ...


9

お[戯]{たわむ}れを is mainly heard in samurai dramas. Typically, a samurai or a maid says this to their master in the sense of "You must be joking" or "You're not serious, are you?" In dramas set in modern Japan, an old butler- or detective-like character may say this, too. A more common equivalent in modern Japanese is ご冗談を. EDIT: You may be wondering which verb ...


9

No, it's not redundant. (Neither is 大勢の人々, for that matter.) While 大勢 means a crowd, generally of the human variety, it usually appears as a modifier rather than on its own. It can modify more specific nouns than just 人, too. So you can have a large family (大勢の家族) or a mob of visitors (大勢の客). It also works with group nouns (like 大勢の集まり) and modified nouns (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible