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10

In modern casual exchanges, 水気 is almost always read みずけ, and I would say you can practically forget すいき. みずけ is a fairly common word, but people probably don't understand you if you said すいき in conversations. That being said, すいき was not rare at least in old novels. According to ふりがな文庫 (a corpus based on furigana in public-domain old novels), both すいき and ...


7

The kanji spellings are directly borrowed from China, so it's Chinese that call them so. Cucurbits are originally tropical plants, thus they were all imported to East Asia at some points of history. 西瓜 suggests that it came from Western Regions, and 南瓜 from Southeast Asia. As they are tropical plants, 北瓜 shouldn't exist logically, but according to a Chinese ...


7

〇〇 is used to mask/censor part of a word. Why censor this one kanji? What is the meaning of 金〇 In contexts related to otaku-ish hobbies, Xおじさん is recently used to form a slang word that means "(stereotypical) middle-aged male X fan". The nuance is more or less similar to 大きなお友達. For example ガルパンおじさん (fans of Girls und Panzer) and アイカツおじさん (fans of Aikatsu!)...


6

〇〇〇〇 implies that various words are applied to 〇〇〇〇. For example, he might say 映画好きのおじさん、公務員のおじさん、車が趣味のおじさん and so on. But he doesn't say it concretely because he would just tell that he is a middle aged man or the word is one that he doesn't want people to know such as 変態, ドスケベ.


5

Alright, so it says 「明{あか}るせつない」 and not 「明よせっない」. The 「つ」 is the regular-size one. 「明るせつない」 is a substandard or highly colloquial way of saying 「明るくせつない」, which means "sorrowful in a lighthearted way". 「スキャット」 means "scat singing". In this song, it refers to the all-katakana part: 「パパパル パパプラルラ パパパル パパプルラ」 You can read the whole lyrics here. That ...


5

いける is a kind of slang (that's why it's often written in katakana) that has a wide range of meanings by itself. This site previously had a question on this word (which is more general), but I can guess with high confidence that, in the particular context you have provided, it means "tried and succeeded". What he means by "try" is still ambiguous from the ...


4

Just as you think, it means “I recommend the movie ‘Sea Monkey.” In this sentence, て means って or という. I think this abbreviation is often used in Kansai.


4

「とろとろ」 in this context would mean "melting", "very soft", etc. 「とろっとろ」 is an emphatic form of 「とろとろ」. That small 「っ」 for emphasis appears at different places in onomatopoeias, but that is another topic. (We say, for instance, 「もっちもち」 ("sticky"), but not 「もちっもち」.) Person A: "Such a villain, he is. How many women has he made cry? With that sweet, ...


4

「声{こえ}をかける」 is quite different in meaning from 「話{はな}す」 in that you can 話す to/with someone for hours if you wanted, but you cannot 声をかける to someone for longer than a minute or two. That is because the basic meaning of 「声をかける」 is "to strike a conversation", which means that it refers to the first couple of phrases or sentences uttered. Thus, if you ...


3

Though I'm not sure whether a real chat room has ever existed in English-speaking world (after a bit of Googling), and I'm not sure it's the perfect match for the hypothetical concept, I know that some facilities actually have 談話室【だんわしつ】 for close or private small-group conversation. A number of diners (mostly cafés) seem to have it as a part of the trade ...


3

“Nihon no kata desuka” “Nihonjin no kata desuka” “Nihon no hito desuka” “Nihonjin desuka” All of them are used. There’s no difference in meaning, but “kata” sounds polite, “Nihonjin desuka” can be rude. “Nihonjin no kata” has two words that means “person”, but it’s grammatically correct. Because there’s “desuka”(敬語), we wouldn’t say “Nihonjin ...


3

It's a little odd and too chūnibyō-ish as a real person name. I know no real person whose real name contains the kanji 炎. It may be okay as the name of a male character in a shounen manga or a fantasy work. (炎羅 might be used also as a female name.) 炎 is the only kanji that has a clear meaning. Both 也 and 羅 are basically just "kanji for names" which do not ...


2

I would read the line as: 反故にしてついてきて、なんて言うの? 身勝手すぎるでしょ……。(だから敢えて問いただすことはしない。) If you follow me ignoring the order/promise (not to go to the battle), what will you say (to that person)? You are too selfish (if you ignore someone's promise/order). (So I won't bother to ask why you can't go with me.) So 反故 refers to the order/promise someone gave to ...


2

If you study kanji more, you'll realize that both readings are acceptable depending on the circumstances. Learning what reading is correct in each situation is something that you will have to practice a lot before you get the feel for it. For the purpose of addresses, in my experience a machi and a chou are mutually exclusive since they mean the same thing....


2

I would read it as AにBが産まれたら ("when B is born/produced in/at A") where A is 誰かの胸の夜の空 ("night sky within someone's heart") and B is 伝えたい気持ち ("passion/feeling to tell something (to someone)"). に is a static location marker (i.e., where something exists) rather than a destination marker here. So 4 is the closest among the four options. This interpretation ...


1

Because you are interpreting the English use of the word 'so' in your sentence literally as 'consequently', you are equating that to ので, but the result in your sentence doesn't follow the action/behavior. You can use だから in this sense, but ので doesn't really work this way. It is more logical. ので shows a natural or expected cause and effect behavior. 'I eat, ...


1

のではないか can be split into five words: の: explanatory-no で: te-form of だ は: the topic marker ない: "not" か: the question marker Put together, it literally means "isn't it that ~?", but essentially it's a formal expression that can be translated as "may" (or "it is possible that ~", "I suspect", etc.). In colloquial Japanese, it becomes んじゃないか. Sometimes ないか is ...


1

なにかな is a word to tell someone. なんだろう is a word to tell yourself. When you are talked to by someone, you should say なにかな to him or her and you should say なんだろう to yourself. なにかな and なんだろう means “What do you want to say?” “What is that?” “What?” “ I wonder what.” In some Japanese TV programs, a comedian has to answer what is in a box (It may be a snake ...


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