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13

A very tricky question, but it is a good one mainly because it made me think. 「響{ひび}く」 can indeed mean "to come home" and "to remain with someone". Only five minutes ago, however, I was going to say the completely opposite thing. Here is why: In this case, "to come home" should mean "to become very clear in an unpleasant way" and not "to come back to one'...


8

You have basically answered your own questions, so I will be brief. "Taboo" is an excellent translation for 「禁{きん}じ手{て}」. The 「手」 in this word originally means "a move or technique" used in sumo, shogi, go, etc. 「禁じ手」, therefore, originally refers to a prohibited technique or move in those sports and games. The 「だす」 in 「扱{あつか}いだす」 is 「出す」. When 「出す」 is ...


8

have seen the literal translation of the phrase 「つかみどころがない」, somewhere along the lines of being either slippery, vague or elusive. I do not see how those can be called the "literal" translations. 「つかみどころがない」 comes from the phrase 「掴{つか}むところがない」. 「掴む」 means to "grab", "catch", "grasp", "take hold of", etc. 「つかみどころがない」, therefore, literally means "there ...


7

全部 here works as an adverb. It's functioning the same way as in... 髪を全部まとめる ケーキを全部食べる 「[束]{たば}にする」 means "put ~~ together". This 束 is like "a group/bunch (of people)". cf: 「束になる」 子供たちが束になって掛かってきた。 The children「attacked me in a group [⦅口⦆ganged up on me]. (プログレッシブ和英中辞典) I think かなう ([敵]{かな}う) here means "match" "equal" or "compare" (「[匹敵]{...


7

Have you tried Wikipedia? どどめ色 どどめ色(ドドメ色、土留色)とは、その名前は知られているが正確な定義のない色。方言では桑の実、また青ざめた唇の色や、打撲などによる青アザの表現に用いられ、赤紫から青紫、黒紫を指す。 慣用句としては青紫色から「病的な」、不正確性から「不明瞭な」、泥色から「汚れた」といったネガティブな意味合いで用いられることが多い Physically, this color refers to dark purple/blue, but ドドメ色(の) is more commonly used as an idiom that means something negative like "dark", "dirty" or "somber"...


6

The star symbols (☆★) have many distinct usages (from near-formal to informal) as a pair of typographical symbols which were available from the first edition of Japanese character set standard. One of the usages of the white star can be named "pop-ification", which contributes little to the meaning, but adds some overall atmosphere of an outgoing kind of ...


5

「Phrase A + よう + Phrase B」 「Phrase A + ように + Phrase B」 In basic meaning, the two patterns above are identical. The only difference is that the second one using 「ように」 is more casual and conversational than the first with 「よう」. For that reason, 「よう」 tends to be used more often in writing. The sentence you have quoted sounds non-conversational; ...


5

Yes, this い is the same as い as in だい or がい. From 明鏡国語辞典 第二版: い 終助 ① 《質問の文の後に付いて》くだけた調子で、親しみの意をこめる。 「これは何じゃい」「もう少し待ってみるかい?」 ② 《肯定や命令の文の後に付いて》意味を強める。 「早くしろい」「いやだい、ぼくがやるんだい」 【語法】 助動詞「だ」「じゃ」などに付いた「だい」「じゃい」、終助詞「か」「わ」「な」に付いた「かい」「わい」「ない」、動詞の命令形に付いた「ろい」などの形で使う。 In modern Japanese, Definition ② (non-questioning sentence-end い, such as ...


5

First of all, by far the most common and versatile phrase for dedication would be: 「[Person] に捧{ささ}ぐ」 That was easy, but how to say the [Person] part is not easy and I almost regret that I started writing my answer. 「赤毛{あかげ}の女性{じょせい}」 would not be used by a native speaker. That I know without thinking as a native speaker. It simply sounds too ...


4

Simply, this アニメ is the name of an old cat. うちの clearly indicates this アニメ belongs to the speaker's home or family. The の in 老猫のアニメ is an apposition marker (i.e., アニメ is an 老猫). See: What's the difference between 日本人の学生 and 日本の学生 ?


4

You are absolutely right. 「禁じ手」usually means 'foul play' in sports. But in this sentence, it is used as a metaphorical expression. 「扱う」has the closest meaning to "handle" in this sentence.


4

「寝落{ねお}ちする」 could not mean "to lie down" regardless of the context. It means "to unintentionally fall asleep", "to fall asleep while doing something", etc. As far as nuance, it is somewhere between "fall asleep" and "pass out". The safest phrase choice for "to lie down (without sleeping)" would be 「横{よこ}になる」. That is because 「寝る」 can mean both that and "...


4

These lines are indeed hard to interpret, but after reading the whole lyrics, my conclusion is that the interpretation in Chiebukuro is not correct, and your interpretation is not spot-on, either. 個人的な嵐は誰かのバイオリズム (lit. "Personal storms are someone's biorhythm") seems to imply you cannot perfectly control your situation and there are always stormy (or ...


4

You don't seem to be parsing it correctly, I'm afraid... I think you could probably parse it as something like... [〝正しいこと〟なんて描くつもりも]、[描ける程、自分を上等とも思ってい]ないけど... And you could split it to: →〝正しいこと〟なんて描くつもりもない + (〝正しいこと〟が)描ける程、自分を上等とも思っていないけど... 「XXもYYも~~ない」(or 「XXもないしYYも~~ない」) = "neither XX nor YY"


4

This song is basically a parody of a Japanese translated version of Jingle Bells; the original line is 雪の中を軽くはやく, not 月海原をパドルパドル. Looks like even Japanese Fate fans do not understand what this パドル means (see this and this for example), but most people seem to guess it is related to English "paddle" (either as a simple noun パドル or a verb form パドる). A few ...


4

返って自分の首を絞めてしまう結果に終わりました。それどころか頼みの綱のレムにさえ破滅への道程を勧められ、それと知らずに「レム、お前頭いいな」などと頓珍漢な賛辞を送ってしまいます。 In this context, 「それどころか」 is fairly synonymous to 「そんなものではなく」 or 「そんな生易{なまやさ}しいものではなく」, which means "not as simple as that", etc. In the pattern: 「Statement A。それどころか + Statement B。」 The author thinks Statement A was an understatement or too simplistic a way to ...


4

I think they meant to say... 「~~時には、・・・終わっていた。」 "By the time~~, had (already) done... / had (already) gone through..." 物置から出してもらった時には、Aし、Bし、Cも終わっていた。 "By the time he (=Harry) was finally forgiven and allowed to come out of his cupboard... Dudley had already done A, B, and C." でも、あんまり美しい日本語(翻訳)じゃないような気がします。。。


3

Seems it would help you greatly if you could get your mind off the definition "greeting" for a moment because it will not apply here. 「迎{むか}えに(やって)くる」 can only mean one thing, which is "to come pick one up (to take one somewhere)". Only when it is in the form 「[Person] +を + 迎える」, 「迎える」 can mean "to greet/meet/welcome [Person]". 「迎えにいく」 and 「迎えにくる」 should ...


3

気を巡らす(せる) almost solely stands for "to circulate / surround with qi". Yes, that qi. Although there are idioms with similar word forms such as 思い巡らす, 考えを巡らす, 気を回す etc., I have never seen that this specific phrase is used in such meaning. What the phrase actually refers to is completely up to what "qi" is defined to be in each context, but I can say with ...


3

As you know, this story is about a family who possesses a one-in-a-ten-million (and almost unhuman) kind of 'photographic' memory. Its members are capable of thoroughly memorizing massive and endless amounts of literature. To describe their own special ability or action, they needed a word to use among themselves or use a common existing word for their ...


3

MIN (or MND) next to INT usually refers to MIND (commonly translated as 精神, 精神力), which is typically related to resistance to magic.


3

絵コンテ is a relatively specific term that refers to storyboards like this. They always have pictures, as the kanji 絵 suggests. It's also a job name, and you can see the word 絵コンテ ("storyboarding") in the staff roll of an anime. 絵コンテ is critically important in the production of animes and CG movies, but many Japanese live-action films or dramas do not have ...


3

The meaning here is probably まるで触れ得ないものの様な, which means "As if it is an untouchable thing". My honest guess is that the author squeezed in 為らざる in order to make the sentence sound more archaic and impressive (rather than having some different meaning in mind). 為る here is equivalent to である、so adding 為らざる is equivalent to writing まるで触れ得ないであるものの様な、which is ...


3

If I were to assign a kanji to this とまる, I would choose 留まる (although 止まる is not incorrect). とまる has several meanings, but here it is close to "to perch" in the sense of "to sit/stay/rest temporarily on a small object". For example you can say 小鳥が電線に留まっている. This type of とまる is normally used with a bird or an insect as its subject, but here it is used with ...


3

「二年間{にねんかん}の景気後退期{けいきこうたいき}を過{す}ぎれば、この国{くに}の経済{けいざい}は最悪{さいあく}の状態{じょうたい}を脱{だっ}するかもしれません。」 「~~を過ぎる」, in this context, means "to get through". 「過ぎれば」 is indeed in the conditional form. "If (we) get through the two-year recession, this country's economy might be out of the worst situation."


3

辞書形+場合 means "In the case someone will do the action". た形+場合 means "In the case someone has done the action". I think "カードをなくす場合は、すぐカード会社に連絡してください。" is unnatural because no one will lose the card deliberately (will have no intention of losing the card). However, if you often lose the card, you can say like this "カードを(よく)なくす場合は、カードを財布の中に入れておきましょう。". For ...


3

「俺{おれ}はどこまで行{い}っても俺だ。」 is almost like a set phrase meaning: "I will always be me." 「どこまで行っても」 literally means "no matter where I go" and it can also figuratively mean "eternally" or "till the end of time". Whether the 'movement' is spatial or temporal is of little importance here unless the context this expression appears in clearly specifies one over ...


2

I think you're parsing it wrong: その is a single word, so 「その中でも」means something like "Also inside/among that" (with も meaning "also, too"). As for 「の中で」, 「中」 also means "among", so 「Xの中」 means "Inside X", "Among X" (like 「Xの右」 means "To the right of X").


2

The phrase つかみどころがない has its own entry in EDICT where it is listed as "vague; fuzzy; elusive; slippery". That's where those translations you are seeing coming from. Nearly every J->E dictionary site or application out there is cribbed from EDICT. The Goo dictionary has an entry for 掴みどころ, which has 掴みどころない人 as an example: つかむ部分。また、そのものの本質や真意を押さえる手がかりとなる点。...


2

I use わけではない as one word response. And I use わけではなく when I want to continue something after that. ex. 「それは~というわけなんですか?」 「いや、そういうわけではない」 「それは~というわけなんですか?」 「いや、そういうわけでなく、~というわけなんです」


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