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36

We are actually talking about two different words here. In phrases like 「さあ、[忘]{わす}れましょう」 and「さあ、[行]{い}きましょう」, 「さあ」 is an exclamation/interjection expressing the speaker's intention to invite or press the other person to perform an action. It has a meaning close to that of "okay", "now" and "come on". When 「さあ」 is used in phrases such as 「でもさあ」,「あのさあ」 ...


35

Yes, you are correct that 中 (ちゅう) in this case means "in the middle of ~ ". For your sentence, the simple translation "downloading" is probably the most natural. It is fairly common to combine a noun with the suffix 中(ちゅう) to express the idea of the "currently in the process of (NOUN)". A few examples of NOUN + 中: 保留{ほりゅう} deferment, holding:  保留中{...


32

[最高]{さい・こう} means "the highest/maximum/best/greatest".


28

The source for this dual meaning already exists in Chinese. 革 is originally a pictograph of a stretched hide that is turned into leather. As a noun it meant just "leather", but as a verb it also meant "stretching something flabby and making it taut", which then was extended figuratively into "making something old new" and from there "renewal". Thus came all ...


28

I was corrected yesterday on this very point when playing Great Western Trail in Japanese. The people I was with most assuredly only use 汽車 for steam locomotives versus 電車 for modern electric rail trains. They found my periodic use of 電車 humorous but wrong enough that they vocally corrected it twice... In the case of the game the trains are 19th steam ...


27

The most commonly known ぬ is the helper verb of negation, similar to ない. It is, like ない, added to the [未然形]{みぜんけい}-base of a verb: [立]{た}たぬ=立たない=does not stand. However, in this case we have ぬ being added to 立ち, and there's a different story behind it. Note how the English wikipedia entry for [風]{かぜ}[立]{た}ちぬ says "The wind rises", with no negative meaning ...


24

イケメン is a new word which means "Good looking male person". イケ comes from イケてる which roughly translates to "cool", "good" etc. メン is a word play, and has two meanings; メン as in "men" i.e. the English word for men, and メン as in 面(めん) i.e. the Japanese word for "face". It is used exclusively to refer to the physical attractiveness of males.


24

The use of「呉」in「[呉]{く}れる」is an Ateji (kanji that are used phonetically, disregarding its meaning).「呉」was used because「[呉]{くれ}」was a way to say "China", derived from a Japanese word for sunset (「[暮]{く}れる」; China being west of Japan). Note,「呉れる」is not a common spelling anymore.


22

It's mojibake, not a valid character. Looking at the character code I suppose it's this emoji sent from a mobile phone: http://code.iamcal.com/php/emoji/


22

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means the exact opposite of what it means literally. Its literal meaning is "Tell a lie!", but that is clearly not something a person would say under normal circumstances, is it?. Thus, 「うそおっしゃい。」 always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A ...


22

I think it may sound condescending because it sounds like you have the right to say something is clearly bad. Typically, you can directly say 悪く(は)ない to someone when you judge their performance/creation as a teacher/expert/senior/etc. When the creator/performer is not present, 悪く(は)ない tends to be more often used. (For example it's usually safe to say ...


22

yes, you read 中 as ちゅう , and 中3 as ちゅうさん 中3 is a shorthand way of writing 中学校3年生 which is (Japanese) Junior High School 3rd graders or in other words, 9th graders. so 中3の25% would be "25% of (Japanese) 9th graders" so the full translation of 「中3の25%、短文も理解困難」 is "Twenty-five percent of 9th graders have difficulty understanding short passages." ...


21

AFAIK, うえ・した is just "(on) top/above vs. (on) bottom/underneath". かみ・しも is usually "upper vs. lower", meaning talking about different parts of the same thing. The easiest example of this to remember is "upstream" vs. "downstream" (川上【かわかみ】 vs. 川下【かわしも】) or "upwind" vs. "downwind" (風上【かざかみ】 vs. 風下【かざしも】). Also, more generically, 上手【かみて】 (upper part) and 下手【...


21

In Japanese, usually 改善【かいぜん】 is no more than a neutral and simple word that corresponds to "improvement" or "refinement". The only fact I know as a piece of knowledge, which make this word somewhat "special", is that some companies like Toyota love this word as a slogan. Apparently, Toyota's special method of 改善, also written specifically as "カイゼン", has ...


20

Basically it depends on how the speaker feels. However, I think we usually say: 死体があります。 ロボットがいます。 if it looks like it has a mind of its own. ロボットがあります。 if it is an industrial robot without a mind. 車がいます。 if it is being driven by a human. 車があります。 when we talk about cars in general. 人工知能(AI)があります。 if it doesn't have anything visual, auditory or physical. ...


20

snailplane's link says, it comes from 皮肉骨髄 "skin meat bones marrow" attributed to the Bodhidharma of Chinese Zen Buddhism. Bones and marrow came to take on the meaning of essential, skin and meat became synonymous with superficial. From there, 皮肉 was also used as a word for criticizing faults/defects (which stems from not recognizing the true nature of sth.),...


20

It can be also ここで食べてもいいですか? or more casually ここで食べてもいい? :)


20

日本語 日本語が理解できると思いますので日本語で回答します。 一般に、また、私も、「じんせい」と聞いて「仁星」を思い浮かべることはできません。私は全く「仁星」という言葉を見たことも聞いたこともなく、自信をもって日本語には無いと思っています。 若者が「仁星」と理解した理由を想像しますと、唯一の可能性は、「しゅう」という言葉が「じんせい」とともに聞こえてきたからだと思います。 私には、その物語を知らないので「仁星」を想起できませんが、もし私が、「じんせい」と「しゅう」を同時に聞いたなら、「じんせいのしゅう」という言葉は日本語にはないので、「人生の終**」か何かの言葉ではないかと考えるでしょう。 私には、あなたと似たような経験がありますのでお話しします。 私が大学生のとき、スイスからの留学生がいました。...


19

chara has several meanings: 1) a lie or joke "chara wo iu", 2) even, zero "kari / hanasi wo chara ni suru". However, chara chara is rather different. Of the various meanings, frivolous and talkative are most relevant. It is hard to miss out on the chara-phenomenon for those that live in Japan. Especially in 2011, Fujimori Shingo (藤森慎吾) made it into a very ...


19

It's easy if you think of 今度 as being like English days of the week. When we say "This Thursday", we don't necessarily mean it is Thursday today (that would be "this day") but we mean the Thursday of this week, or "this (coming) Thursday". "Next Thursday" would denote "the Thursday of next week". Likewise, the translation of 今度 as "this time" can stand ...


19

Japanese has tons of compound verbs (複合動詞{ふくごうどうし}) and やり直す is one of them. やり is the masu-stem of やる, which is a very basic verb that means "to do." Note that this verb is almost always written in hiragana when it simply means "to do." 直す here means something like "re-" (as in "reorder", "rethink", etc). It can follow almost any other verb and add the ...


19

For the etymology of 赤ちゃん "baby" gogen-allguide.com says the following: 赤ちゃんの語源・由来 新生児の皮膚の色が赤く見えることによる語で、「赤ん坊」や「赤子・赤児」も、皮膚の色に由来する。 民間語源には、赤ちゃんを意味する韓国語「アガ」を語源とする説もある。 しかし、「赤ちゃん」や「赤ん坊」の語が成立する以前に「あが」の例は見られず、成立後に見られる「あがちゃん」や「あがんぼう」は訛りであるため、この説は考え難い。 また、子供を叱る時の「メッ」という言葉も、韓国語で「鞭(ムチ)」を意味する「メ」に由来するものとし、それを根拠に赤ちゃんの語源も「アガ」とするものがある。 「メッ」の語源と「赤ちゃん」...


18

To give a few working examples: 私は猫が怖い。 I'm scared of cats. 恵美子ちゃんは猫は平気みたいだけど、私は怖いらしい。 Emiko seems to be fine around cats, but apparently is scared of me. 僕は怖いよ。 I'm scary, just so you know. That makes 私は怖い officially ambiguous and the answer to your question must be "both, depending on the context".


18

「おいしいとこ(ろ)(を)もって(い)く」 was an extremely popular phrase until about a decade (or even longer) ago but it is not very anymore. It basically means "to steal the show", "to take a big bite" or "to take the best part". For this "new" meaning, 「おいしい」 should be written in kana. Using 「美味しい」 would look out of place as one is not talking about food. If you said ...


18

There is no semantic difference when they mean "to wake up (e.g., in the morning)", but 目覚める sounds more bookish and literary. In the most casual settings, people usually say 起きる or 目を覚ます. In addition, each has derivative meanings: 目を覚ます also means "to regain one's sense", "to recover from illusion", "to notice one believed in something wrong". 目覚める also ...


17

The reason is because that is generally the closest translation that you can get in English most of the time. Let's look at some examples: 今度の仕事の方が前の仕事より厳しい (My new job is harder than my old one) In English, when we think of "next time", we think of something that hasn't happened yet, something that is in the future. However, as shown in the example ...


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