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8

This is not a grammar point. と is simply acting conjunctively to link nouns while による here means "depending on". Here is how the sentence is parsed: (時と場合と猫)による It depends on the time, the situation, and the cat.


7

It is true that Japanese people use a larger number of words on a daily basis. According to one survey introduced here, the number of words needed to understand 90% of English sentences is 3,000, but you need to know 10,000 words to achieve the same level of proficiency in Japanese. As you know, Japanese has tons of onomatopoeic words, wago-kango pairs and ...


7

事に is not placed at the end of the sentence. The full sentence is あまり物騒な事に首を突っ込んだらダメよ XXXに首を突っ込む is a set phrase. It means "to meddle into something." It is almost equivalent to English's "poke your nose into something that is none of your business." You can understand the sentence as It's bad to excessively poke your nose into ...


6

This ところ refers to a particular situation/scene, and ~ところを is a set phrase that means (本当は)~ところで or (普段/本来は)~なのに. See: Does ところを always mean the same thing as のに? What is the difference between ところへ and ところに? 4分のところ is a somewhat abbreviated expression, but it means 通常は4分のところ or 本来は4分待つところ, or "the situation where one normally waits for 4 minutes". ...


6

けぇっちまえーっ means 帰{かえ}っちまえ. けえる is a working-class accent of かえる in Tokyo. It is 東京下町ことば. A sound of "ai" changes to that of "ee" in that accent in some words such as ちげーねー(違いない), でぇーこん(だいこん). http://www.muse.dti.ne.jp/~squat/tokyoben.htm 「~ ちまえ」is a rough way of saying 「~ てしまえ」. So けぇっちまえーっ is something like "Just get out!".


6

あわてなさんな ≂ あわてるな "No hurry" "Don't panic" なさんな is a contracted pronunciation of なさるな. なさるな consists of: literary honorific 「なさる」 + negative imperative final particle 「な」.


5

Final particles (ね, よ, な, さ) can be thrown in the middle of a sentence in conversation as if fillers. There are technically two types: follows the first word/chunk of the sentence それがね、本物のマツタケなんです That one, see, is the real matsutake. もしもね、ゾンビに襲われたら If, I mean if, you're attacked by zombies... It is used to emphasize and draw hearer's attention. This can ...


5

This vertical bar is a long vowel marker written vertically. Here, it just indicates "Minato" is pronounced with some accent. In English it would be "Mii-nato!" or something. Maybe the speaker said "Minato" slowly and loudly to draw attention, or maybe the speaker is not a native Japanese speaker. You can see the same symbol ...


4

In this context, the second phrase is just a loose self-restatement. まあ 無理に聞いても 言わせてもね lit. "Well, even if (I) ask (her) forcefully... even if (I) make (her) say (forcefully), don't I" Well, no use extracting it... forcing her to say it... Ending a sentence with Vても usually implies "V doesn't help" or "V makes no good".


4

This な is a masculine filler particle meaning nothing. If you know ね, さ or よ used like this, this な works the same way. Examples of filler-な: What is the にはな used for in the following sentence? Meaning of triple particle (?) のはな What do 「はな」 and 「いうとな」 mean? Also related: What does さあ (saa) mean? Use of さ as a filler Spaces in children's books


4

漬からされてた=漬からされていた=漬からせられていた Verbs often have two causatives, one in ~す and one in ~せる. ~す is considered more informal these days, but I think it's the original. So this is the past of the passive causative form. 'has been caused to be submerged,' literally


4

大した is used to express admiration for something one finds remarkable or extraordinary. 大したもんだ or 大したものだ is kind of like saying “You are something” but it sounds condescending. It may also be used sarcastically.


4

It's not a pun. According to sources, it's abbreviated 鬼のごとく正しい ("correct like an oni", "demonically correct"). It's not a set phrase ordinary people recognize. The heroine somehow liked this funny phrase after seeing it somewhere, and started using it as a pet phrase. I have no idea where that HEX in the English translation came from. ...


3

なんか is a word used to make light of the word before it. It's interchangeable with なんて here. なんな right after it is a contraction of なるな. See this answer for the rule. So the sentence is basically 冷静になるな ("Don't be cool/calm") but with the implication that 冷静 is an undesirable thing to him for now. He noticed that the dispassionate and realistic ...


3

["バスケット部がなんでいバスケット部が!"] なんでい is the masculine form of なんだい,なんなの,なにさ, etc as explained in the comment. It seems to be a variant of the Edo dialect べらんめえ口調. Without the context, the meaning is hard to figure out. Probably the phrase is used in a condescending manner. The speaker probably does not like the basketball club, so they uttered the ...


3

As you said, this で is "at" (at a place). 日之出ん家で means "at Hinode's house". ~ばいいのに has the other meaning, which is a suggestion such as "why don't you ~". This する in the manga means "take a poop". So it means "Why don't you take a poop at (the bathroom of) Hinode's house?"


3

The words you're having trouble with are 現場、目標地点、軽装 They're not difficult words, so if you didn't have any trouble with the rest of the sentences, I guess I won't need to say more.


3

Do I understand correctly that ン signifies the sound echoing / fading to silence? While I often feel like the sound is fading out or terminating when I see ン, this has nothing to do with that function. This is what we hear. It's like the english equivalent of "ng" sound. "Echoing" here is to extend the last sound, right? If so, it's the ...


3

No, して is not omitted. 見る is one of the verbs that take AをB(だ)と. The following sentences roughly mean the same thing: 当局は(この事故を)東の極右政党による暗殺だと見ている。 当局は(この事故を)東の極右政党による暗殺と見ている。 当局は(この事故を)東の極右政党による暗殺として見ている。 Please see also: Difference between だと vs と before 認める


2

そういうのが得意って奴のが向いてるかも。 means そういうのが得意って奴の[方]{ほう}が向いてるかも。 XXのが~ is a colloquial, a bit slangy way of saying XXの[方]{ほう}が~. I think it's a pretty new usage. Examples: 「結婚するなら、カッコいい人より優しい人のがいいかな。」 「マイナンバーカードって、持ってない人のが多いと思う。」


2

しもーた is a variant of しもうた, which is a Kansai dialectal version of しまった used with an undesirable outcome. See the links posted by broccori. ん at the end of the sentence is explanatory-の/ん used to seek clarification. This type of sentence-end の commonly turns to ん in casual western speech (e.g., 好きなの? → 好きなん?). 何であんなふうに育ってしもーたん。 = 何であんな風に育ってしまったの? Why did he ...


2

It is a working-class accent of たたきつけて. I feel it is べらんめえ口調(江戸言葉). https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B1%9F%E6%88%B8%E8%A8%80%E8%91%89


2

Since he seems to be talking about something related to pleasant sensations, this ぶっ飛ぶ should mean "to trip", "to reach ecstasy", "to get extremely high", "to come" or something along these lines. ぶっ is an intensifier, and one of the slangy meanings of 飛ぶ is "to (almost/temporarily) lose consciousness/memory"....


2

This is a colloquial form for 「する-か」. I don't think this is considered to be a particular dialect. (This form isn't used in western dialect, so it feels a bit eastern to my ear, just as the standard Japanese language does.) In the dialog, A invites B to eat together, and B agrees (そうすっか == そうするか). Other examples you might encounter is ~~でもすっか = でもするか.


2

Different kanji allow for nuance, but also can be used to give a literary flare. According to my 漢和中辞典, 滲みる describes water deeply soaking into something. 染みる describes something slowly soaking through something else. 滲みる: 滲は水がしみ込むこと 染みる: 染は、じわじわと、しみとおること The nuance here seems rather subtle, but given what you've said, if it's just a matter of something ...


1

This is a set phrase that literally means "That(it) is a big deal." But the connotations and actual meanings depend on the context. A breakdown of the phrase goes: 大した considerable; great; important; significant; a big deal もん=もの thing だ copula You can use this expression to praise the someone else by marveling at their achievement. Similar ...


1

いまいった in the above sentence can be analyzed at least in two ways. The first is much more probable than the second in any context. いま (now) + いった (have said) meaning, as I have said いま (now) + いった (have passed away) Considering the context and a very particular adjective of すじのいい (natural bent), it will be safe for me to determine on the first analysis. ...


1

Yes, the second じゃない is an informal way to say something like "right?" or "don't you agree?". You can see the rest of the sentence as the actual statement, and じゃない just as a way to involve the other person. Something like "isn't it?", if you want to have a negative example.


1

くれてやっかい is a contraction of くれてやるかい. The word 厄介 is not related. In general, るか may contact to っか in very informal speech: するか → すっか やるか → やっか 見るか → 見っか なるか → なっか 来るか → くっか 生きるか → 生きっか, 食べるか → 食べっか, ... すっか/やっか are relatively common, but others are uncommon. I probably have not heard 乗っか, 寄っか, 切っか, 取っか, 怒っか and so on, so this works with only a few common ...


1

This 節目 vaguely refers to important life events such as 入学/卒業, 成人, 就職/転職, 住宅購入 and 結婚, but one of the most important is probably 七五三 today. In other words, one enters the next life "stage" after a 節目, and it's a good timing to thank and pray for Japanese kami. The kanji 節 means "section", and it's the same 節 as in 季節. There is no charge ...


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