18

ウィ is the standard way of transcribing [wi] or [wɪ]. Similarly ウェ is used for [wɛ] (for example website → ウェブサイト) and ウォ for [wɒ] or [wɔ] (for example wombat → ウォンバット or walkman ウォークマン). Here ウ is used to emulate the [w] sound and ィ is a small kana, indicating the vowel. The small ィ also makes ウィ into a digraph (same length as single full-sized kana). ...


14

Short Answer: As for the Japanese language, we didn't have such a word and I don't think we should have had. Ancient Japanese only knew as far as India, that means they only knew one "landmass" in their world. Just like the Nile means "river", or the Sahara means "desert", it was not supposed to have a name, except "outside of Japan". Long Explanation: ...


8

If you search for the page referenced on Wikipedia ("11 Origins of 11 Super Mario Characters' Names"), you'll find the answer: Anyway, in Japan, he’s named Kinopio, which is a mixture of the word for mushroom (“kinoko”) and the Japanese version of Pinocchio (“pinokio”). Those blend to be something along the lines of “A Real Mushroom Boy.” https://...


7

Although Sino-Japanese words (aka kango) are technically loanwords, they have been an integral part of the Japanese vocabulary for more than 1000 years. Practically speaking, it's almost impossible to avoid all of them. Some very common kango which have no easy wago equivalent include: 百, 千, 万, ... hundred, thousand, ten thousand... 学校 school 日本語 Japanese (...


7

As said in l’électeur’s answer, it’s far more likely that you’d use some longer phrase to describe such a word. However, it seems like there is some currency for the term 「外行語{がいこうご}」, born as a reversal of 外来語. It doesn’t show up as in option in my kanji completion list, and its usage seems fairly minimal, but it is intuitive enough (written, not so much ...


6

Native Japanese speaker here. So as @l'électeur pointed out, 「人孔」 would in theory fall under this umbrella of a calque. However, in this case, 「マンホール」is far, far more common. In the 18 years I've lived in Japan, I've heard the word「人孔」exactly 0 times. That's how common (or rather, uncommon) it is. In fact, you said 「そこの人孔に気をつけてください。」 to someone on the ...


6

Rather than providing a pronunciation closer to the English word, it provides a description of the Japanese pronunciation. The Japanese W sound is essentially spoken by moving from a うto a second vowel. I. E. わ starts as if you are going to say う and then your tongue moves into position to say あ. This is different from English W which uses more rounded ...


6

People on the internet (1, 2) suggest that 鮭卵 may be used as jukujikun for イクラ, but as you already found out, イクラ itself derives from Russian икра (ikra) and is usually written in kana.


5

I don't think it's quite a catch-all phrase, but I guess people may use ゼミ for smaller specialized classes with more professor–student interaction, even if the professor actually gives all the lectures/talks. (I guess in this case you would use "course" and not "seminar" in English.) I don't think ゼミ would be used for the main compulsory classes in an ...


4

Apparently, even historical kana spelling used ウ rather than ワ, as in ウヰスキー (still kept in company names such as ニッカウヰスキー. So where would the usage of ワ come from? As you explicitly refer to Wikipedia, I found a couple of discussions on the kana displayed in the Wikipedia logo, such as this (from 2006): The current Wikipedia logo originally contained the ...


4

I did a quick search for both headwords in two well-known corpora. The results are below: BCCWJ: (Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese) 贈り物 668 entries プレゼント 3268 entries Tsukuba Web Corpus 贈り物 5672 entries プレゼント 21974 entries It seems that プレゼント is indeed more common than 贈り物. Having said that, 贈り物 shouldn't be considered a rare word ...


4

電子レンジ only refers to a microwave, that box-like device: An electric stove like this is called 電気コンロ or 電熱線コンロ in Japanese. Although they are common in western countries, they are rare in Japan, and many people have not seen one. I suppose there are many people who imagine "IH" (電磁調理器) instead when they hear 電気コンロ today. IHs are common in smaller ...


4

This song is basically a parody of a Japanese translated version of Jingle Bells; the original line is 雪の中を軽くはやく, not 月海原をパドルパドル. Looks like even Japanese Fate fans do not understand what this パドル means (see this and this for example), but most people seem to guess it is related to English "paddle" (either as a simple noun パドル or a verb form パドる). A few ...


3

Can I assume the main users of your app are IT workers? If this is an admin panel for something like RDB, VCS or headleass CMS, ロール is the go-to translation (don't elongate ル). Using a non-katakana word might even confuse users. For example see this. As an alternative, WordPress seems to use 権限グループ (literally "privilege group") as the translation of Role. I'...


3

To expand on Ben's answer, many English speakers get confused because we don't realize that the English spelling of many words does not actually reflect very closely how we actually say them. We get so used to them that we automatically associate the English spelling with the pronunciation we already know, without thinking of whether the vowels used are ...


2

The other answers have pointed out that ウィ is the preferred kana combination, which also happens to be the standard suggestion if I type wi on my Japanese keyboard in kana mode. This answer will attempt to state why ワィ would be a bad choice. The most common kana to be followed by small kana are those of the /i/ series used together with ゃゅょ to form ...


2

・ I could not find any specific data on this, but if I would guess, I'd say that is natural, maybe almost automatic, that when the speaker are trying to associate with English culture or something imagined as being of English origin the speaker would use グランド, and the same should occur with the French グラン. As グランプリ is of French origin the "french" way is ...


2

Japanese katakana versions of English words are based on the sound of the word, not the spelling. Work is ワーク:this vowel sound "o" changes to "ア" "Work" is pronounced with the same vowel sound as "bird" or "heard", and they all come out as アー in Japanese: ワーク, バード, ハード. But only the words with starting with "w" are opposite. Do you know why? Your ...


1

My book gives the word in hiragana but the dictionary also shows katakana. Google has three times more results for いくら軍艦 than イクラ軍艦, and Bing has just over twice as many for the hiragana version, so it seems hiragana is more common. A quick google revealed that it is a loanword from Russian so katakana seems more appropriate. As it happens らーめん is from ...


1

It's a thing in Mandarin world (Taiwan maybe?) to know several Japan region(Prefectures/cities) has unique emblem in its manhole cover(マンホールの蓋) design. As result, the term (人孔/人孔蓋) is a more used Kanji in Chinese instead of Japanese (人孔蓋 is a fairly common term in Mandarin news report that I remembered)


1

My current understanding is as follows (thank you Yosh and broccoli forest for the insightful comments). デレる is an ichidan verb probably because it's actually an old verb coined in (or before) the 19th century, when the verb-coining rule was different from that of today. でれる did appear in several works in the 19th century. Although でれる was rare according to ...


1

You have chosen a word that has a very wide range of meanings in English. Google tranlate has had to guess which meaning. When you translate "card" do you mean: A "western" playing card (a different borrowing, but adapted) : トランプ A "Japanese" playing card: 札 A credit card: カード Thick paper: カード 厚紙(Japanese have had paper for a long time, but Japanese ...


1

I believe it's simply the way the word was borrowed. Each English or other loanword in Japanese has or eventually acquires a standard writing. Of course some have more than one accepted writing, but the point is the transliteration can seem arbitrary or like it's more different from the original language's pronunciation than it is. Indeed, in some cases it ...


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