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10 votes
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Multiple older siblings

姉上【あねうえ】 is a very old-fashioned honorific word for 姉. You would hear someone respectfully addressing their older sister with 姉上 mostly in samurai dramas. But you can never use it to distinguish your ...
naruto's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

What sibling terms do twins use towards each other?

Yes, even if the age difference between twins is just a few minutes, the one who is born first will be the 姉/兄, and the other will be the 妹/弟. However, since they are of the same age, they rarely call ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is the kanji for sister-in-law and step sister the same?

If your question is how to tell meaning of 義姉, you need to guess from contexts in the present-day colloquial language. Strictly speaking, [義]{ぎ}[姉]{し} or [義]{ぎ}[妹]{まい} only means (or meant) sister-in-...
SAKAMOTO Noriaki's user avatar
6 votes
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How do you tell your parents and siblings you love them?

How do you tell your parents and siblings you love them? I've never heard that someone especially tells their own parents and siblings they love them in my country and culture, which is Japanese. In ...
karlalou's user avatar
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5 votes
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What are common familially intimate names?

mother -- ママ, お[母]{かあ}さん, 母さん, 母ちゃん, お[袋]{ふくろ}, etc. father -- パパ, お[父]{とう}さん, 父さん, 父ちゃん, [親父]{おやじ}, etc. elder sister -- お[姉]{ねえ}ちゃん, 姉ちゃん, 姉さん, [姉貴]{あねき}, etc. elder brother -- お[兄]{にい}ちゃん, ...
chocolate's user avatar
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5 votes

Forms of address for multiple older brothers

Since there is no real universal rule regarding how to distinguish two big brothers or sisters in form of address, each family might have their own way, but one common pattern is [nickname] + 兄【にい】/姉【...
broccoli forest's user avatar
4 votes
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Are 腹違い (harachigai) and 種違い (tanechigai) rude terms to use when referring to half-siblings?

Generally 種違い or 腹違い is not considered as rude/discriminative, it is simply a bit oldish. In not-so-frequent occasions to refer to such things, I guess 父親/母親が違う would be used. That said, I won't be ...
sundowner's user avatar
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4 votes

Forms of address for multiple older brothers

like "Joshua" to "お兄さん". How about 「ジョシュア兄さん」? E.g. [太郎]{たろう}[兄]{にい}さん [次郎]{じろう}[兄]{にい}さん [花子]{はなこ}[姉]{ねえ}さん モモコ[姉]{ねえ}さん
chocolate's user avatar
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4 votes

Meaning for 昔から大好きな親戚の姉さん

This 'の' should most naturally be regarded as an apposition, rather than possession. So it refers to a 姉さん, who is your 親戚. Looking up a dictionary, the definition of the word 姉さん usually starts with ...
Yosh's user avatar
  • 3,956
4 votes

what does 人の mean?

人 is a person, but the word you're looking at is 一人, pronounced ひとり. It's made up of the kanji ー for "one" and 人 for "person", and it means "one person.” In this case,  一人のむすめ means "one daughter."...
mamster's user avatar
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3 votes
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How should I refer to my family?

In Japan there is a distinction between inside and outside. If you know which you're dealing with, it will help you determine the words you use. (This applies to more than just how you talk about ...
A.Ellett's user avatar
  • 10.4k
3 votes

what does 人の mean?

In Japanese it is required that you add a counter word to virtually any number. Just “一” by itself has little practical meaning; one-what exactly? This is a somewhat foreign concept in English, but ...
deceze's user avatar
  • 5,695
3 votes
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Is it true step-sibling is translated the same as sibling-in-law?

The short answer is yes, the same word is used for step siblings and siblings-in-law. After all, step siblings are just siblings in legal terms, so I don't think it is particularly odd. For simplicity,...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 37.5k
3 votes

Pitch: Why for mom and dad is the 2nd syllable stressed but for aunt and uncle is the 1st syllable stressed?

it's oKAA-san and oTOU-san but then it's Oba-san and Oji-san. お母【LH】, お父【LH】 おじ【HL】, おば【HL】 I think these are incorrect, I'm afraid. In Standard Japanese: [おかあさん]{LHLLL} [おとうさん]{LHLLL} [おばさん]{LHHH} ...
chocolate's user avatar
  • 65.6k
2 votes

When speaking to a family (where they all have the same last name), is it okay to refer to people by their first name?

Normally your options are (1) FirstName-san or (2) otou-san, okaa-san, etc. Personally, FirstName-san would sound too friendly assuming the parents are much senior to you. This applies to other ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 37.5k
2 votes
Accepted

How would you address a younger step-parent / older step-child?

I guess such a situation is too rare to be discussed in general, but the following is likely. If Rhaenyra and Alicent has been friends, they would continue to call each other in the way they have ...
sundowner's user avatar
  • 37.5k
2 votes
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Difference between 伯母 and 叔母 and how to translate them into English

伯母 : the father's or mother's elder sister 叔母 : the father's or mother's younger sister In Japanese, the title for the father's side and mother's side are the same. As a comparison, in ancient China,...
sfy's user avatar
  • 200
1 vote
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Motokano S01E01: Addressing / referring your step-parents as 1st name-san vs aunt / uncle

Okaasan is used for only your mother. ~obasan is used for other's mother. ~san is commonly used for people. So, okaasan(otoosan)>~obasan(~ojisan)≧~san. However I don't think it's that so different.
鯛のお造り's user avatar
1 vote

Japanese kinship terms

First off, the honorific prefix お or ご must come at the very front of a word. Neither ひい[お]{●}まごさん or ひ[お]{●}まごさん work because the ひ ("great-") and the noun it modifies cannot have anything ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar

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