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28

Yes, absolutely. It's called "style shift." There's a whole book about it, and it's covered in brief in A Dictionary of Advanced Japanese Grammar, but in short: The most common place to hear style shifts is when the background style is polite. In most conversations in です・ます style between native speakers you will hear shifts to plain form. Here are some ...


14

本日 is keigo. You will hear this on a train or airplane, or in a store. But you won't be saying it yourself, unless if you as a beginning student are put in the unlikely position of making an official announcement to someone. 今日 is what you would use in ordinary situations.


14

I feel that the expressions you listed include "super-polite" apologies which would be a bit too much in this situation. The professor would be surprised if you really used these heavy expressions. (And it would be more true considering the fact that he knows you're not a native speaker of Japanese.) Among those, 大変失礼いたしました is probably the safest, and you ...


11

Asking someone to speak in plain Japanese is not rude if it's done nicely. However, asking someone to speak in Teineigo seems strange, I would say. Because it sounds like a challenge. Keigo(敬語) is composed of Sonkeigo(尊敬語), Kenjogo(謙譲語) and Teineigo(丁寧語). So, a Teineigo-only conversation sounds like a sorting Keigo quiz or something. How about asking them ...


11

It's ambiguous whether いらして would be a form of いらしる or いらす, but neither verb exists in the standard language. いらす isn't listed in dictionaries as a word because it's not a separate verb with a full range of forms. It would be more accurate to say that いらし is a reduced form of いらっしゃっ, the 音便形 of いらっしゃる. (The 音便形 is the altered form of the 連用形 that appears ...


11

I don't understand why the same logic can't be applied to お世話になっております お世話になっております is not the same construction as お V になる. It is originally from the phrase お世話になる or お世話になっている and may have a superficial similarity to お V になる, but they are different. Some points to consider: 1. 世話 is a noun, not a verb. Yes, you can attach する to make the verb 世話する, but you ...


9

でもリトリートがどんなものかは、However as for what kind of thing the retreat is スケジュールをご覧になって頂くと、if you look at the schedule 一番分かると思いましたので、I thought you would best understand so 未完成ながらも while not complete 送らせて頂きました。I sent However I thought you would best understand what sort of retreat this is if you took a look at the schedule, so I went ahead and sent it though it's ...


9

写真をお届け! I think it's short for 写真をお届けします! or 写真をお届けいたします! "We will deliver a photo/photos to you!" お届けする is the humble form (謙譲語) of 届ける. Examples: ~をご報告 / ご案内 / ご連絡 / ご紹介(いた)します!--> ~をご報告!/ご案内!/ご連絡!/ご紹介! キャンペーン情報をお知らせ(いた)します!--> キャンペーン情報をお知らせ!


9

This looks primarily like a 敬語{けいご} problem, more than a syntax or semantics problem. お使いいただく is 敬語, and 食べる does not match it at all. 食べる is neither 尊敬語 nor 謙譲語. This means that 「ご飯を食べる」 is not even polite when 私 is the one doing the eating. There are many ways to say (あなたが)食べる in 敬語: 召し上がられる お召し上がりになる (*1) お食べになる etc. (私が)食べる in 敬語: いただく ちょうだいする Your ...


8

This is called 「ウ[音便]{おんびん}」 and it is one type of the 「音便 (euphonic sound changes)」 that took place around Heian period (794 - 1185). 「ウ音便」, in the simplest terms possible, is the dropping of the "k" consonant from the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of i-adjectives. The 連用形 of 「うれしい」 is 「うれしく」. Drop the "k" from 「うれしく」 and you have 「うれしう」. To make 「...


8

It just means "You can use this table" (e.g. a hotel employee explaining to a guest). 「こちらのテーブルをお使いいただけませんか?」 means "Could you use this table (instead)?" (maybe the guest sat at a wrong table).


7

To answer the title question as a simple yes-no question, the only logical answer would be "Yes, it is." The phrase clearly uses a [敬語]{けいご} twice,「[拝見]{はいけん}」 and 「いたす」, which satisfies the definition of [二重敬語]{にじゅうけいご}. Is the phrase 「拝見いたしました」 "incorrect" then? According to me, no, it is not. Why not? Because it is in such wide use and it just ...


7

That is not the [尊敬]{そんけい} usage of にも for at least three reasons. 1) 尊敬 (= "respect") is already expressed in the words [陛下]{へいか} and the お part of お[考]{かんが}え. 2) 「~~にも考えがある」 is a frequently-used set phrase in which the subject (the ~~ part) can be a first-person pronoun or even a murderer. 3) にも is used for 尊敬 only in highly limited situations, such as ...


7

Let's look at each of these one-by-one: いらっしゃる is a lexicalized contraction of 入{い}らせらる, which is described in 精選日国† as follows: (動詞「いる(入)」の未然形に、尊敬の助動詞「す」の未然形、同じく「られる(らる)」の付いたもの)「入る」の尊敬語。おはいりになる。 In other words, it was a combination of 入る with the respect auxiliary す and the passive auxiliary らる (in modern Japanese られる). くださる is a lexicalized ...


7

時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 時間がありませんでしたからパーティーに行きませんでした。 While the second one is relatively a bit politer than the first, neither of these are very casual nor polite. If you said these directly to the host of the party, the host would probably feel offended. If you said these to your close friend, he/she would feel that the "~でした" part is unnaturally ...


7

Both sentences have minor issues even though they may be considered good in Japanese as a foreign language. At least, both are grammatical. 「から」 actually sounds more casual/informal than many J-learners seem to think. That is the impression that I get from speaking to them. The more formal words with the same meaning would be 「ので」 and 「ため/ために」. With 「...


7

Although 本日 will usually be too formal for most situations, there are many cases where you would use it over 今日 (with slightly different nuances). Typically when referring to something tied to the day's date: 本日の魚 (in a restaurant) 本日の会議 (in a professional context) etc.


7

Practically, you can consider お父【とう】様/お母【かあ】様 as the most polite form. It's a safe word in every formal speech, even at a wedding ceremony or funeral, as long as you don't forget the prefix お. 母上/父上/父君/母君 are mainly heard in pre-war history dramas. A few old people may use these words when they make a very formal speech, but I would avoid them. If I heard ...


7

The sentence: 「[山田]{やまだ}さんがいらっしゃいますでしょうか。」 is definitely more than weird and it is nothing native speakers would say. The particle needs to be 「は」, and never 「が」. To ask if someone is in, the topic marker is always 「は」. Admittedly, though, using 「が」 to do so is a very common mistake among Japanese-learners. There is, however, a situation in which 「...


7

is いらっしゃいませ usually just said in a service-oriented environment (such as restaurants, hotels, and shops)? Yes, it is. I think it's not wrong in your office but a little weird. "お待ちしておりました。(Omachisiteorimasita)" may be best for this situation. It means like "We(I) have been waiting for you."


7

よろしくお[願]{ねが}いします is a very common phrase, and its お願いします part consists of: Continuative/Pre-masu form 「[願]{ねが}い」+ Humble expression (謙譲語)「お~~する」 します is the polite form of する. 願い is the continuative/pre-masu form (連用形), or the noun form, of the verb 願う. And here it's used in the sense of: ねがう【願う】〘動五〙 ➌他人に対して、こうしてほしいと頼む。「寄付を願う」「協力を願います」 (表現)...「...


7

「お/ごXXいただく」 is the humble form of 「XXしてもらう」. 「お/ごXXくださる」 is the honorific form of 「XXしてくれる」. (「ください」 is the imperative form of 「くださる」.) You normally won't insert を here. In general, you use 「お+連用形+いただく/くださる」 for native Japanese verbs, as in: 「待ってもらう」→「お待ちいただく」 「待ってくれる」→「お待ちくださる」 (→「お待ちください」 in imperative form) and 「ご+名詞(語幹)+いただく/くださる」 for Sino ...


7

お待ちする is the humble form (謙譲語) of 待つ. So お待ちしておりました is the humble way of saying 待っていました, "I was waiting / I've been waiting (for you)." (おります is the humble form of いる.) For more on the humble form 「お+連用形+する」, please refer to: Do all verbs have an honorific and humble form? ようこそ お待ちしておりました! "Welcome! I've been waiting for you!"


6

As you probably have already guessed, there is no hard rule about how many times you can use お and ご prefixes in a sentence. We often avoid using too many honorifics, and it is true that there is a general tendency to use honorifics in the final verbs. However, we sometimes use honorifics also in other places. This is different from 二重敬語. For example, ...


6

I don't have expertise in this area, but here's the extent of what I've been able to find about it. The main distinction that you'll be looking for is between 謙譲語 and 丁重語. Both serve to elevate the listener, and they overlap quite a bit. The key, however, is that the main use of 謙譲語 shows respect to those who appear in the conversation while 丁重語 expresses ...


6

It is difficult to talk about the phrase 「ごめんなさいませ」 mostly because it is not in wide use (that is unless there actually exists an area that I am unaware of where it is often said). I have probably heard it 2-3 times in my life, but that means only once every 10 years or so. I feel like it has (almost) always been an adult woman who I have heard say it. ...


6

If you're really grateful for the offer, and you'd like to stay in touch with X会社, but you can't help but turning it down, then you can't be too polite. You could write something like this: 非常に魅力的なご提案をいただき、ありがとうございます。○○様に誘っていただいたことを大変光栄に思っています。 しかしながら、現在の職場でどうしても責任をもって終わらせたい仕事が残っているため、大変残念ですが、今回はご期待に沿うことができません。申し訳ございません。 今後も○○...


6

The なはった is the past tense form of なはる, which is the Kansai version of honorific なさる. So [起]{お}きなはった would be like 起きなさった in standard Japanese. そら見い いよいよおきなはったあ ≂ そら見ろ、いよいよ(≂とうとう)起きなさった。(≂ 起きられた / 起きてしまわれた) Is the 「はったあ」 the past form of 「はる」 or 'to do' in Kansai dialect? The meaning is the same, just your example uses なはった/なはる. Actually we more ...


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