18

ウィ is the standard way of transcribing [wi] or [wɪ]. Similarly ウェ is used for [wɛ] (for example website → ウェブサイト) and ウォ for [wɒ] or [wɔ] (for example wombat → ウォンバット or walkman ウォークマン). Here ウ is used to emulate the [w] sound and ィ is a small kana, indicating the vowel. The small ィ also makes ウィ into a digraph (same length as single full-sized kana). ...


11

Good point. It's actually unpossible. 「アッ」と発声した後息を溜める所作を表現したものと思われるが、「ッ」の後に「ー」が続くという発声の不可能性からネットミームとしてウケ、やがて同性愛関係で「ア」のつく発声を表記する際に多用されるようになった。 (source) While supposed to be transcription of a gasp after uttering アッ, its impossibility of vocalization, that a ー follows a ッ, has made it viral as an internet meme, eventually becoming a popular way to transcribe ...


8

If you search for the page referenced on Wikipedia ("11 Origins of 11 Super Mario Characters' Names"), you'll find the answer: Anyway, in Japan, he’s named Kinopio, which is a mixture of the word for mushroom (“kinoko”) and the Japanese version of Pinocchio (“pinokio”). Those blend to be something along the lines of “A Real Mushroom Boy.” https://...


6

It's very surprising to me that this hasn't been answered somewhere on the site before, but after quite a bit of searching I can't find anything. This may just be so basic that it has slipped between the cracks. The ー in these words (and generally in katakana words) represents an extension of the vowel before it. According to Wikipedia, which is actually ...


6

People on the internet (1, 2) suggest that 鮭卵 may be used as jukujikun for イクラ, but as you already found out, イクラ itself derives from Russian икра (ikra) and is usually written in kana.


6

Rather than providing a pronunciation closer to the English word, it provides a description of the Japanese pronunciation. The Japanese W sound is essentially spoken by moving from a うto a second vowel. I. E. わ starts as if you are going to say う and then your tongue moves into position to say あ. This is different from English W which uses more rounded ...


4

Apparently, even historical kana spelling used ウ rather than ワ, as in ウヰスキー (still kept in company names such as ニッカウヰスキー. So where would the usage of ワ come from? As you explicitly refer to Wikipedia, I found a couple of discussions on the kana displayed in the Wikipedia logo, such as this (from 2006): The current Wikipedia logo originally contained the ...


4

Ok, I found the answer. I'll post it here in case anybody ever else needs it. This is taken from the show Aggretsuko and it's actually a mispronunciation クリック (click)


4

When it comes to localization of proper nouns, especially titles, experts may do something aggressive for various reasons. It's a very creative task, and you have to be very good at both languages and cultures. Check this list of Pokémon and imagine how Japanese names are localized to English. You can see many patterns: Transliteration: ピカチュウ → Pikachu; ...


4

This is a wordplay analogous to "holy moly" or "see you later alligator". It's completely nonsense except that it sounds somewhat rhythmical and humorous. See 地口 for similar examples. (Note that rhyming in its narrow sense is less important in Japanese.) (EDIT: Or maybe you can think of this as a "prologue to the scat part" ...


3

There are a number of stylistic or aesthetic reasons to do so. Sometimes katakana is used for a native Japanese word because of the katakana's "international", "modern" or "high-tech" feeling: Why is Toyota typically written in Katakana? (トヨタ) ニッポン? Why Kana? However, katakana is also associated with oldness and tradition because it was the standard script ...


3

It's exactly the same reason why マンガ is commonly written in katakana. For some words, katakana makes them look "soft", "casual", "catchy", "friendly"...or whatever. This is why アタマ is often used in product names and catchphrases, as shown below: As you can see, this has nothing to do with respect or humbleness. You ...


3

It's three distorted small-tsu's in katakana (ッッッ), which is like !!!. Related: What does the little っ (tsu) signify when at the end of a word? How would I indicate yelling when writing Japanese?


3

Based on my experience, my opinion is that you can choose how to write it. Similarly to you, my name can be written in katakana either with or without the long vowel (ー). And I can also find precedents where my name has been translated both with and without it. Personally, I like the way it sounds better without the long vowel so I just use that one. I've ...


3

I'm not a native English speaker, but as Eiríkr Útlendi pointed out in the comment section, I feel there is a /ʊ/ sound even in American English (as long as the word is pronounced slowly and clearly). This can be confirmed by several sources on the net. Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/though#Pronunciation Forvo: https://forvo.com/word/though/ ...


3

To expand on Ben's answer, many English speakers get confused because we don't realize that the English spelling of many words does not actually reflect very closely how we actually say them. We get so used to them that we automatically associate the English spelling with the pronunciation we already know, without thinking of whether the vowels used are ...


3

絵コンテ is a relatively specific term that refers to storyboards like this. They always have pictures, as the kanji 絵 suggests. It's also a job name, and you can see the word 絵コンテ ("storyboarding") in the staff roll of an anime. 絵コンテ is critically important in the production of animes and CG movies, but many Japanese live-action films or dramas do not have ...


3

Just like other symbols in this answer, these encircled katakana are mainly used to prefix items in a list. For some reason, Japanese people historically used to like encircled characters, just as English speakers like to use letters enclosed in parentheses ((I), (a), etc). Japanese letterpress companies had many movable types for encircled characters. That ...


2

・ I could not find any specific data on this, but if I would guess, I'd say that is natural, maybe almost automatic, that when the speaker are trying to associate with English culture or something imagined as being of English origin the speaker would use グランド, and the same should occur with the French グラン. As グランプリ is of French origin the "french" way is ...


2

Tom Kelly's response is downvoted, but is actually more correct than any other phonologically speaking, but still not the entire story so I'll elaborate on it and will show an audio analysis comparing it with true gemination so that the difference be visible. The sokuon in Japanese maps to what Japanese speakers perceive as a coherent atomic unit of sound [...


2

Japanese katakana versions of English words are based on the sound of the word, not the spelling. Work is ワーク:this vowel sound "o" changes to "ア" "Work" is pronounced with the same vowel sound as "bird" or "heard", and they all come out as アー in Japanese: ワーク, バード, ハード. But only the words with starting with "w" are opposite. Do you know why? Your ...


2

The other answers have pointed out that ウィ is the preferred kana combination, which also happens to be the standard suggestion if I type wi on my Japanese keyboard in kana mode. This answer will attempt to state why ワィ would be a bad choice. The most common kana to be followed by small kana are those of the /i/ series used together with ゃゅょ to form ...


2

Here is a tip for any time you want to write something in Katakana. Go to the English wikipedia article, then click the Japanese version. This is a perfect way to find the proper spelling for certain brands or city names in the Katakana script! Cheers!


2

In general, the lone-standing [ʃ] tends to be represented, as it is the case with most of the consonants, with the U vowel: thus, I'd expect it to be rendered as シュ. Luckily, we can check that: by putting "Tymoteusz" into the Japanese Wikipedia search, we can learn whether there are precedents and how famous people with that name are rendered. On this page, ...


2

It's "ブワアッッッ" I heard that it’s a sound effect or sfx like Japanese symbol, but I’m not sure. Yes, ブワッ is a sound effect for something spreading, exploding, overflowing, etc. Additional ア and ッ just strengthen it. In this case, it represents his blood spouting out. ブワッ is a very common sound effect and used in various way. Translation list below ...


2

You mention acronyms but give examples of abbreviations in names. My answer assumes you mean abbreviations. It's standard to use romaji for the initials in people's names (abbreviations). For example, OJ Simpson = O・J・シンプソン T.S Eliot = T・S・エリオット George W Bush = ジョージ・W・ブッシュ As for acronyms, it seems to be a mixture. Well-known acronyms can be used in ...


2

Onomatopoeic words can generally function adverbially with or without と. However, for onomatopoeias ending in 〜っ, と is usually added. Onomatopoeias can be written either in hiragana or in katakana, but as is common for grammatical particles the と will usually be written in hiragana. See also What is the purpose of adding と? What does "fūtsu" mean? ...


2

You are right, sa is not the correct input. You need to type sha or sya to get シャ, meaning it's actually "Warushawa" - somewhat closer to Polish pronunciation


1

Purely speculative though, I think it's somewhat condescending description of children's head because the kanji :「頭」is normally used to describe an important person. 頭{かしら} is the head of the group of carpenters. 頭{とう}取{どり} is the CEO of bank. 船頭{せんどう} is the captain of the ship. So, the author wants to used「アタマ」for children's brain/mind/head in somewhat ...


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