18

「コ」 is short for 「コーン」 ("corn") here. This type of shortening is very common in Japanese when the word would get too long without it..


17

I do not know of a monolectic term for that though there might exist one. The polylectic term that should be understood by virtually all adult native Japanese speakers would be 「日本語{にほんご}からの借用語{しゃくようご}」. By inserting 「[language name] + における」 in front of the term above, you can safely and unambiguously say "word(s) borrowed from Japanese (used in [language ...


16

Basically, there are just some sounds that exist in other languages which cannot easily be phonemically represented in Japanese. Disclaimer - this is a simplified answer, but ... As with any language, you must differentiate between the actual sounds (phonology) and the writing system which represents the language (orthography). Although there are ...


16

ウェ, ティ and so on are collectively called extended katakana. As you can see in the link, the full list of extended katakana is fairly long, to the point where it's not suitable for beginners. Importantly, it's not for native Japanese words; most of them are used only when you have to represent foreign sounds accurately. I think it's a bit like é in English; ...


12

As a fact-based answer, there is nothing much to say besides that コ here stands for コーン (corn). However, I'm pretty sure that the exact word form バタコチーズライス is chosen because it makes a reference to two major characters in the famous children manga/anime series アンパンマン, namely バタコ (a female baker) and チーズ (dog). (from the left: チーズ, バタコ, ジャムおじさん)


9

I think that either ハニーフ or ハニフ is probably what you want. As has been mentioned in the comments, both seem to be used by people with the same name. I think the best way to choose between the two is to use the pronunciation/intonation in your native language as a guide: if you pronounce your name as Hanif (i.e. the stress on the first syllable / short i), ...


8

It's from English "gap". She is referring to the large difference of an otter's face between when it's not eating and when it's eating. I guess she regards the former face as "handsome/cool" and the latter face as "relaxed and cute, although goofy in a sense". ブサイク is normally a negative word, but it's not always negative at least to some young girls... ...


8

The amount of kanji is irrelevant because they are a writing system. The thing is that, when writing a foreign word in japanese, what happens is that the sound of the word is aproximated to the sounds available in the Japanese language, and then it can be written down using a Japanese syllabary such as hiragana or katakana (not Kanji). What you see in ...


8

I assume that you're referring to「缶」- it's not pronounced as in English, but an on'yomi (and also a word used in Chinese). This is a bit hard to see in the shinjitai form. In kyūjitai, the kanji is「罐」.「罐」is made up of semantic「缶」(picture of a jar/pot) and phonetic「[雚]{かん}」, which occurs in many characters as a sound component: [觀]{かん} (Shinjitai: 観) [權]{けん}...


8

Statistically speaking, the answer is definitely kanji, because the vast majority of Japanese nouns (including place names) are written in kanji. For example, on signboards, Tokyo is 東京 (kanji), Ginza is 銀座 (kanji), subway is 地下鉄 (kanji). However, there are over 1000 common kanji each with more than one reading, while there are only 40-some hiragana/katakana....


7

Its style is called 普通文 and it developed from 漢文訓読体, which was used in literal translations of Classical Chinese texts and was based on Old to Middle Japanese grammar. 漢文訓読体 and 普通文 were widely used in official documents and academic texts, as well as in texts translated from Chinese. You might want to start with learning Classical Japanese (古文). Who is ...


7

How do you pronounce th in the? Not a t sound and then an h sound, right? You read it as one sound (the voiced dental fricative). Well, it's a similar concept. It's not テ+イ. It's ティ, with a small ィ, and together they read as "ti". Actually, テイ (regular sized イ) could be "te" with an elongated "e" sound, or it could be "te" + "i". I don't want to get into ...


7

As said in l’électeur’s answer, it’s far more likely that you’d use some longer phrase to describe such a word. However, it seems like there is some currency for the term 「外行語{がいこうご}」, born as a reversal of 外来語. It doesn’t show up as in option in my kanji completion list, and its usage seems fairly minimal, but it is intuitive enough (written, not so much ...


7

The road signs in most places in Japan have been standardised, such that any directional signs will typically have both Japanese (typically kanji with kana where appropriate) and English for place names. Most other signs will either have just a symbol or include a small amount of Japanese (e.g. 止まれ), possibly with English as well. As for shop signs, they ...


6

The short answer is "Don't worry". Reasons: There are already many loanwords that contain サル, such as サルサ "Salsa", フットサル "futsal" and サルベージ "salvage". For historical reasons, Japanese has tons of homophones. せいこう (seikō) means "success", "precision" and "sexual intercourse". かみ (kami) means "paper", "hair" and "god". In a language like this, the similarity ...


6

The "proper" way to write this word is ラーメン because it's a relatively recent Chinese loanword. You can easily confirm this fact using any dictionary. But ラーメン has evolved in a unique way in Japan in the last 100 years or so to the point where it may be called a Japanese dish. And some old and "Japanized" loanwords are written in hiragana as if they were ...


6

This dish would be "Butter Corn-Cheese Rice" in English, something similar to Corn and Rice Casserole!


6

Whichever is fine, but katakana tends to be preferred in formal settings. For example, when you take a message over the phone from someone who only called himself Saiki, then you can say サイキ様からお電話がありました. Saiki can be 佐伯, 斉木, 西城 and so on in kanji. Writing さいき様 is not wrong, but it may look childish. Traditionally, katakana has been used as the default ...


6

I think the "ギャップ" is used as more of a colloquial usage than dictionary usage. I found the link : "かわうそファンが6年かけて発見!可愛いすぎる4つのポイント" I borrow the different sentence how "ギャップ" is used from the site. The excerpt is 個人的にはアクリル板をカリカリする仕草がツボです。かわうそのやんちゃさが良く出ています…! しかも、可愛いだけではないのがかわうそのすごいところ!水中をカッコよく泳いだり、時には野性味たっぷりに魚にかぶりついたり。さっきまで、あんなに可愛くしていたくせに…!でも、...


5

We don't use サラリーウーマン. OL (pronounced オーエル) is a catch-all, wasei-eigo term for female office workers. Don't try to "spell it out" as オフィスレディー, which is usually not understood. However, some people believe it mainly refers to low-ranking workers who does clerical work, and even English Wikipedia article for this is written with such a prejudiced view: OL ...


5

Per the definition from 大辞林, via the entry page at Weblio: 純粋に精神的なさま。特に、恋愛において、肉欲を伴わず純粋に相手を思うさま。 「 -な愛」 (Emphasis mine.) There's nothing about being in a platonic friendship. Nor is there anything about physical passion. I'd suggest the following translation. Even if men get married and are happy, it's that they can't forget their first love (on a ...


5

I've been following this thread with some interest. So far, I think folks are missing some of the underlying sense of 持つ, and the semantic overlap with certain English expressions that might more clearly explain the development to English readers. 持つ does include senses of "to hold", as mentioned by the original poster. However, it also includes senses of ...


5

I think it's not 小せェサル but [小]{ちい}せェ(サルの)島国. ちいせぇ is a rough, slangy pronunciation of ちいさい. (See: What does こまけー mean? / What is じゃねぇか? What is its original form?) この + 小さい + サルの島国 this little island of monkeys 小さい describes (サルの)島国. It's probably referring to Japan. I think サル here is used as an offensive/derogatory word for Japanese people.


4

Both are perfectly correct, and the difference is small. But, as you said, context is very important, and we need much more context to say which is better. In what kind of context do you want to say "(web) developer"? In general, 開発者 is a relatively stiffer and more traditional word, and it may be preferred in news articles and official government documents. ...


4

There are considerable variations in how a 外来語 is transcribed. The wikipedia page for LA says 日本語では、外務省など政府機関においては「ロサンゼルス」としているが、「ロサンジェルス」「ロスアンゼルス」「ロスアンジェルス」などとも表現されている. There is a good article by NHK here. Apparently, the Japanese government has changed the official way of transcribing country/city names this year. The article also talks about why some ...


4

モテる derives from 持てる. It is written with katakana to show its colloquial meaning. (Note that it is モテる and not *モてる. Similarly one has キレる, イケる, ウケる, etc.) For example 大辞林 has もてる【持てる】 (動 タ 下一) 〔「持つ」の可能動詞から〕 ① 人気があって、ちやほやされる。 「女に-・てる男」 ② 長くその状態を保つ。維持する。もちこたえる。 「共通の話題がなくて座が-・てない」 I guess the meaning of モテる can be explained as follows. 持てる ...


4

As in many other languages, phonetic changes have occured in Japanese over the centuries. One of them is with "wi". We actually used to pronounce the mora "wi" as "wi". The hiragana for that was 「ゐ」 and the katakana, 「ヰ」. In our time, however, this syllable has disappeared and has been replaced by the consonant-less 「うぃ」 and 「ウィ」, respectively. Thus, 「...


4

It appears to depend upon which organization or company is assigning the designation. Usually using 65 to 70 years of age as a lower threshold. This is similar to varying ages for 'senior discounts' (in the US anyways). Here is a page from NTT Facilities Research, which lists a few terms regarding the elderly relative to age.


4

Does the word for squid (ika) come from another language? Adding on to kimi Tanaka's answer, I see in the 日本国語大辞典 entry here that the word ika appeared in the 播【はり】磨【ま】風【ふ】土【ど】記【き】 of 715. There aren't many long-form Japanese texts older than this, so we can say with some certainty that, if this were a borrowing, it would have been borrowed during the Old ...


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