11

Good point. It's actually unpossible. 「アッ」と発声した後息を溜める所作を表現したものと思われるが、「ッ」の後に「ー」が続くという発声の不可能性からネットミームとしてウケ、やがて同性愛関係で「ア」のつく発声を表記する際に多用されるようになった。 (source) While supposed to be transcription of a gasp after uttering アッ, its impossibility of vocalization, that a ー follows a ッ, has made it viral as an internet meme, eventually becoming a popular way to transcribe ...


8

No, even native speakers cannot read this. As istrasci says, the blue part is more like タツノン. People can probably identify most katakana in the red part, but it's almost impossible to recognize フランキス as a word. The last ス looks more like ズ. I almost thought this was a fan art made by someone who doesn't understand katakana well, but this is something that ...


7

Typically, it is not a matter of AB vs. BA (the correct order is AB), but a matter of which direction is the A stroke written; is it left-to-right, or right-to-left? There are numerous sources that claim it should be left-to-right. From kakijun.jp: However, there are other sources that claim it should be from right-to-left; like a more (but not completely) ...


7

If you can pronounce バート correctly in the Japanese way, that's it. Simply elongate バ as it is actually spelled. As long as your pronunciation is clear, no one will be confused between バート and バト. (Read this and this if you have doubts.) The same for ティオ. By the way, conveying kanji over the phone can be much trickier. If this fails and you do need to explain,...


5

巻【まき】の七十二 is just a traditional way to say "Volume 72". Were it not a ninja manga, we would normally say (第)七十二[巻]【かん】. の is the only way to connect a noun to another in Japanese. Unlike English, you cannot directly attach "with", "from", "by" and such to a noun unless via の. The の alone is thus the most ambiguous and ...


4

Tom Kelly's response is downvoted, but is actually more correct than any other phonologically speaking, but still not the entire story so I'll elaborate on it and will show an audio analysis comparing it with true gemination so that the difference be visible. The sokuon in Japanese maps to what Japanese speakers perceive as a coherent atomic unit of sound [...


4

Ok, I found the answer. I'll post it here in case anybody ever else needs it. This is taken from the show Aggretsuko and it's actually a mispronunciation クリック (click)


4

When it comes to localization of proper nouns, especially titles, experts may do something aggressive for various reasons. It's a very creative task, and you have to be very good at both languages and cultures. Check this list of Pokémon and imagine how Japanese names are localized to English. You can see many patterns: Transliteration: ピカチュウ → Pikachu; ...


4

This is a wordplay analogous to "holy moly" or "see you later alligator". It's completely nonsense except that it sounds somewhat rhythmical and humorous. See 地口 for similar examples. (Note that rhyming in its narrow sense is less important in Japanese.) (EDIT: Or maybe you can think of this as a "prologue to the scat part" ...


4

Unsurprisingly, this depends on both the word itself and how formal you have to be. You cannot tell the register of a word accurately just by looking at its etymology. In the case of ググる, this verb is not something you would see in traditional newspapers or very formal business letters, but you can hear ググります in everyday business conversations using です/ます. ...


3

It is usually used before consonants that are categorized in phonetics as plosives or stops, affricates, and unvoiced fricatives, or more precisely unvoiced sibilants. Stops: the initial sounds of か /k/, が /g/, た /t/, だ /d/, ぱ /p/, and ば /b/ Affricates: the initial sounds of ち /tɕ/, じ or ぢ /dʑ/, つ /ts/, and ず or づ /dz/ Unvoiced sibilants: the initial sound ...


3

The names of these products are making use of 飾りフランス語 to give a French touch to them, but suggesting they are related to any existing foreign desserts remains to be seen... ブランチュール is probably made of ブラン (blanc) and チュール (tulle). For the first part, English bran can certainly be discarded in favor of French blanc (white) since it contains milk chocolate (...


3

Just like other symbols in this answer, these encircled katakana are mainly used to prefix items in a list. For some reason, Japanese people historically used to like encircled characters, just as English speakers like to use letters enclosed in parentheses ((I), (a), etc). Japanese letterpress companies had many movable types for encircled characters. That ...


3

It's exactly the same reason why マンガ is commonly written in katakana. For some words, katakana makes them look "soft", "casual", "catchy", "friendly"...or whatever. This is why アタマ is often used in product names and catchphrases, as shown below: As you can see, this has nothing to do with respect or humbleness. You ...


3

The fact that ドンピシャ (meaning "right on, fitting to a T") is written in katakana makes me wonder if it comes from a foreign phrase, but I can't figure out which one (out of the European languages I speak). Does anyone know? どんぴしゃ is a native Japanese term, written in any script. Or, if it's an originally Japanese word, can it be spelled with kanji,...


3

It is because the original inventor of Toyota was a man by the name of Kiichiro Toyoda with a D. Both the Katakana and Hiragana with the ten ten for the Da sound make for the name to have 10 strokes. In Japanese the number 10 or 十 in Kanji has the connotation of being at a cross roads. While the number 8 or 八 in Kanji is lucky because it widens at the ...


2

You mention acronyms but give examples of abbreviations in names. My answer assumes you mean abbreviations. It's standard to use romaji for the initials in people's names (abbreviations). For example, OJ Simpson = O・J・シンプソン T.S Eliot = T・S・エリオット George W Bush = ジョージ・W・ブッシュ As for acronyms, it seems to be a mixture. Well-known acronyms can be used in ...


2

Onomatopoeic words can generally function adverbially with or without と. However, for onomatopoeias ending in 〜っ, と is usually added. Onomatopoeias can be written either in hiragana or in katakana, but as is common for grammatical particles the と will usually be written in hiragana. See also What is the purpose of adding と? What does "fūtsu" mean? ...


2

You are right, sa is not the correct input. You need to type sha or sya to get シャ, meaning it's actually "Warushawa" - somewhat closer to Polish pronunciation


2

卷ノ(の)七十二 can be read in two ways. The first 二十七ノ卷, this is an old way reading Japanese letters from right to left. The second 卷ノ七十二, this is a new modern way reading them from left to right. Even as a native speaker of Japanese, I am a little perplexed, and have done a little search about his Manga. The answer is: 卷ノ七十二, meaning Vol. 72.


1

Sania san, your handwriting is very good for a beginner. As you continue to practice, you will discover nuances to improve in both your hiragana and katakana (we all do!); but you are doing well. If I were to choose one kana to focus on first in comparing your writing to charts, it would be タ in the katakana syllabary. Kudos to you for taking on Japanese ...


1

I have class in ten minutes is 私は10分後に授業がある。 I will go to my calss in ten minutes is 私は10分後に授業に行く。 In japanese, the most natural way to say it might be (自分の)授業は10分後に始まる。 which is my calss begins in 10 minutes.


1

When it appears in a kanji compound (or some compounds which mix kanji and kana), it is the kanji character for 'one' 一. This can be read as いち or ひと depending on the context. When it appears in kana words (mostly katakana), it is called a chōonpu (超音符) and functions to lengthen the previous vowel. 日本一 (にほんいち) (kanji compound) ケーキ (keeki) (katakana) おーい (...


1

允可ス is 允可する in modern Japanese. す is the classical version of する. (允可 itself is rare in modern Japanese. We usually say 認可する or 認める today.) Katakana was the default kana for particles, okurigana and such until relatively recently. Orthography at the turn of the previous century Why is this written in katakana instead of hiragana?


1

Purely speculative though, I think it's somewhat condescending description of children's head because the kanji :「頭」is normally used to describe an important person. 頭{かしら} is the head of the group of carpenters. 頭{とう}取{どり} is the CEO of bank. 船頭{せんどう} is the captain of the ship. So, the author wants to used「アタマ」for children's brain/mind/head in somewhat ...


1

The question literally translates as: Is it (the) swiss Mr. Kremer or is it the german Mr. Kremer? (It could could be also Mrs. instead of Mr. depending on context.) You might be confused by the literal translation since it implies that there are 2 Mr. Kremers, one from Germany and one from Switzerland. But despite this somewhat strange phrasing (which ...


1

That will depend on your intentions. Without additional qualifications, your name would be read ホウ・コウシン in Japanese, as these are the only on-readings of the corresponding characters that are current in Japan. If that is okay with you, no additional effort is needed. (Note though that 彭 is not a frequent character in Japan, and you cannot be sure that an ...


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