13

Yes, it must be, because it appears (or has appeared) in various inflected forms such as あかへん. There are multiple theories about where exactly it comes from, but according to 日本国語大辞典 it's derived from らち(埒)があかぬ: 「らち(埒)があかぬ」の上を略した表現「あかぬ」の変化した語 Martin's Reference Grammar of Japanese (1975) is slightly dated but has some interesting discussion on page 385, ...


11

According to 大辞林, わ can also have a non-feminine meaning of: 軽{かる}い詠嘆{えいたん}や驚{おどろ}きなどの気持{きも}ちを表{あらわ}す。 - Expresses mild feelings of admiration, surprise, etc. So the idea here is to express that lovely "oh!" feeling you get when your ears pop, as you can see by his smile. I can't honestly say how prevalent this is, or if you ought to use it.


9

There's a couple of similar expressions with overlapping meanings here, so I'll elaborate on @sawa's answer to add some color. しょーむない is probably a cute slangy way to say しょうもない, which is a common contraction of しようもない, which means "silly" or "useless". This is mainly used in western dialects, and the standard would be しようがない (often contracted to しょうがない) or ...


9

That statement basically only applies for おる as a simple existence verb. Non-humble おる is very common in Kansai. As a subsidiary verb, various forms including とる/ちょる/よる are commonly used instead of standard (~て)いる, but there are considerable regional variations even inside Kansai. See this discussion. 太郎はおる。 There is Taro. / Taro is here. (≒太郎はいる) ...


8

Yes we do! :D Here in Kyoto we use both わからん and わからへん. I think Osakan women rather use わからん. As for ならん, I think it's あかん in Kansai. Yes, we Kansai women use it daily, too. We talk like: あかんって。(=だめだって。) あかんやん。 あかんやろ。 (=だめだろう。) 知らん。(=知らない。) 知らんで。(=知らないよ。) 知らんわ。 知らんし。 あらへん。(=ない。) あらへんで。(=ないよ。) いらんわ~。(=要らないわ~。) ありえへん。(=ありえない。) こうてへん。(...


8

来なんだ = 来なかった. The negative past. You often hear this form in 時代劇 and from old people in fiction (think [波平]{なみへい} in Sazaesan, Dumbledore in Harry Potter...) デジタル大辞泉の解説 なんだ[助動] [助動][なんだら|なんで(なんだり)|なんだ|なんだ(なんだる)|なんだれ|○]動詞型活用語の未然形に付く。過去の打消しの意を表す。なかった。 [補説]語源は未詳。打消しの助動詞「ぬ」に「あった」の付いた「ぬあった」の音変化とみる説や、打消しの「なん」に過去の「た」が付いた助動詞からとする説など、諸説がある。...


8

はん is a name-suffix used almost exclusively by people from Osaka/Kyoto. The level of politeness はん has depends on the speaker. Manzai comedians, geisha, or stereotyped heavy Kansai-/Kyoto-ben speakers in fiction may use はん everywhere, even when they're being very polite (e.g. お客はん, 社長はん). But I believe most real Kansai-ben speakers consider it as a ...


8

「ほな前座はこれにて」 → "Well then, that's it for the opening act." 「閉店ガラガラ」 is one of the signature shticks of the comedian 岡田圭右, of the Kansai comedy duo ますだおかだ, typically used at the end of their comedy sessions. (「閉店」 means the closing of a shop and 「ガラガラ」 is here an onomatopoeia for the shutter being pulled down.) The extra 「ガラ」 in the manga could be a ...


8

「言う」+「たら」 In Standard Japanese, the only correct combined form is: 「言ったら」 In Kansai dialects, however, 「言うたら」 is also used on a daily basis. It is a regionally correct form. Currently, many popular TV personalities in Japan are indeed from Kansai (including a number of most successful ones). Thus, it is only natural that you frequently hear 「...


7

Never seen よーちぇん before but it must be a lazy pronunciation of 幼稚園{ようちえん} So: "I haven't forgotten it since kindergarten" And no context in the question but おらん will most likely be the negative of おる, yes.


7

As you have already picked up on, the intonation (change in pitch) of words is vastly different. A common example is the pronunciation of the word 日本. Osaka: Starts high, and pitch lowers にほん【HLL】 Standard: Starts low, and pitch raises and then lowers にほん【LHL】 However this is not the only difference between Kansai-ben and Standard Japanese, ...


7

Edit. (Thanks to naruto for pointing out the correct translation.) 大丈夫!バンパー外すよりまし!笑 No problem! Better than missing the bumper! lol よりまし is より ("than") + まし ("better"). I don't quite know why, but you seem to get the opposite meaning.


7

Regarding 「ああ」, it is only the adverbial form of the 「あ」 from the famous 「こそあど」. It means "like that", "in that manner", etc. Thus, 「ああなる」 means "to become that way". Note that this has nothing to do with Kansai speech; It is used all over the country. The adverbial forms for こそあど are: こう、そう、ああ and どう With 「ああ」 taking a different form from the other ...


7

「これアカンやつやぞ何か言わんとハードルガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To insert punctuations and the omitted particles if that helped you a little, it would look like: 「これはアカンやつやぞ!何か言わんとハードルがガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To translate this Kansai speech into Standard Japanese, it would be: 「これはいけないやつだぞ!何か言わないとハードルがガンガン上がっていくやつだぞー!」 「あかん」 means "no good". The 「と」 in 「何かいわんと」 is a conditional ...


6

I'm not sure due to lack of context, but there's a high likelihood that it's in Kansai-ben/Kansai dialect. What's written is Kansai-ben negation. The Hyojungo/standard version would be あなたも なかなか やるじゃないの〜 Here are some links that should be helpful: List of Hyojungo to Osaka-ben suffix conversions. Please refer to the 8th listing. (in Japanese) Wikipedia ...


6

やるやないの This is a Japanese dialect used mainly the Kansai region (Hyogo, Osaka, etc.). Perhaps you have misunderstood which words are being used in the sentence: ≠ 「やる」 + 「やらない」 ≒ 「やるじゃない(の)」


6

The different pitch accent patterns is easily the most noticeable phonetic difference when you look at the Kansaiben dialects (and it's important to mention that this is a group of dialects rather than a single dialect with no internal regional variation), so it's easy to conclude that this is the only real different in pronunciation between standard ...


6

There are some significant differences between Kansai-ben and what you see in textbooks, I'm not sure where you would get the idea that the only difference was in pitch emphasis. There are some very significant pitch-differences, but that's not the only change. (Personally, I felt the pitch changes were much easier to notice in Kyoto, but that might have ...


6

I believe so. I can't find an explicit affirmation (I provided sources which I've read before, but I could have forgotten or missed such a statement), but for present tense adjectives in the Kyoto-Osaka dialect, it seems the accent falls on the antepenultimate mora (third to last) for trimoraic words or longer, otherwise it falls on the penultimate mora for ...


6

The なはった is the past tense form of なはる, which is the Kansai version of honorific なさる. So [起]{お}きなはった would be like 起きなさった in standard Japanese. そら見い いよいよおきなはったあ ≂ そら見ろ、いよいよ(≂とうとう)起きなさった。(≂ 起きられた / 起きてしまわれた) Is the 「はったあ」 the past form of 「はる」 or 'to do' in Kansai dialect? The meaning is the same, just your example uses なはった/なはる. Actually we more ...


6

「なろうた」 is how Kansai people say 「ならった/習った」 ("learned"). 「どこかでなろうたんですか。」 thus means: "Did you learn it someplace?" Other examples of this Kansaiism: ・わらった ⇒ わろうた (laughed) ・あらった ⇒ あろうた (washed) ・もらった ⇒ もろうた (received)


6

やろ (or やろう) is a Kansai equivalent of だろ(う) which means "I wonder" or "I think." This の is a nominalizer which nominalizes everything before it (日本人にとっても~腹立つ). ~の(は)なんでやろ = ~の(は)なぜだろう = I wonder why ~.


5

I'm a Japanese from Niigata Prefecture, but I've came across a lot of people from Kansai. 「疲れまんねん」is just a way of saying「疲れますねん」. 「ねん」is almost added to any Kansaiben phrase. Such as: 「違います」is「ちゃうねん」in Kansaiben. 「なんですか?」is「なんやねん?」in Kansaiben. Sometimes it is 'embedded' inside phrases. 「そうとは違います」is「そうとちゃうねんな」in Kansaiben. 「ねん」is basically「だよ」「なの」「なのだ。...


5

There are four main parts to consider: な (the form of the copula before のだ) のだ (which has a wide range of uses and is highly context-dependent) よ (an interactional particle) さ (another interactional particle) The last three are all highly context dependent. But the character ends all of their sentences with them, right? They just pile them all on with no ...


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