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12

Yes, the kana に is derived from the Chinese character ([漢字]{かんじ}, kanji) 仁. See also the English Wiktionary page and the Japanese Wikipedia page, among other references. All kana derived from kanji. In fact, the word kana originally meant something like "provisional / borrowed + name / label" (from older kari na or 仮り名), in reference to the way ...


9

The cause is most likely that your font setting (of a program or OS) have gone wrong. As far as I can see the said character in the input box looks rendered with a Chinese font. The glyph you see and the intended Japanese one share the same meaning and the same code point in Unicode (Han unification). Thus computers cannot tell which is which binary-wise, ...


6

EDIT: With some more research, I found the reason. As I expected, it's due to historical unification of JIS X kanji with Unicode codepoints. Here's a GitHub thread about the issue, including precisely the two characters you asked about. The tl;dr is that the Japanese codepoints corresponding to those characters, which were unified with the Simplified Chinese ...


5

JIS 0208 is frozen in development, in two versions (with different glyph forms): as JIS X 0208:1997 (the 1990 forms) and as JIS X 0208 (2004 forms). It has basically never revised its contents since 1997, and only once, in 2004, corrected the particular forms of the glyphs in it. 人名用, however, are in constant development. Especially important was the case of ...


4

図 ("zu") is a word that primarily refers to technical diagrams and illustrations. A typical 図 is something shown in this page: Technical illustrations are also 図, but artistic illustrations are not. The English word "figure" has many meanings. 図 refers to "figure" as in "This research paper has one table and four figures&...


3

From Wikipedia: 日本における漢字表記では濠太剌利とされ、またそこから濠洲(ごうしゅう)とも呼ばれる。「連邦」を付け濠洲連邦(濠洲聯邦)ということもある。「濠」「洲」は常用漢字の「豪」「州」を代用して豪太剌利・豪洲・豪州と書くことも多い。 Your previous confusion of 濠 and 豪 actually makes sense in this context, as 「濠太剌利」「濠洲{ごうしゅう}」「豪洲{ごうしゅう}」are all ateji. Basically the idea is when a non-Chinese foreign word like "Australia" comes to Japan, an attempt is ...


2

It's the old/traditional form of 遂 (the second character you listed). You can see it under Korean Hanja in this wiktionary page.


2

On'yomi and Chinese: how sounds correlate In almost* any discussion of kanji usage in Japanese, do not use the Mandarin pronunciations as any kind of guide to the Japanese pronunciations. (* The exception is any discussion of recent borrowings from Mandarin, like [你好]{ニーハオ}.) Much as Japanese has changed a lot in the last 1500+ years, so too has Chinese ...


1

It is used for Executive Producer according to Wikipedia. エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー (英:executive producer)は、プロデューサーのさらに上の職で、管理職・幹部に当たる。製作/制作、製作総指揮/制作総指揮などの名義でクレジットされる場合が多い。 Note that Nintendo seems to use katakana vesion of エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー for CEO of the company. コンピュータゲーム業界で見られる。任天堂においては「エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー」の肩書は代表取締役社長に対してのみ使用されている。


1

I'll answer one of your questions. how do you know the correct reading if you come across a kanji you dont know? You know the correct reading because you recognize the kanji as part of a word that you know. When you see, let's say, the word 自動車{じどうしゃ} (automobile), there is no mental process such as "ah, its 自{じ} + 動{どう} + 車{しゃ}, じ - どう - しゃ, wa-lah, ...


1

I'd hate to throw the "there's an app for that" answer at you, but there indeed are such apps. Some make you write it with finger on screen, some let you point the camera at the kanji in question and recognize it for you. https://www.appbank.net/2020/06/10/iphone-application/1859201.php


1

Etymologically, in Chinese, 濠 or 壕 (depending on whether it is watered or dry) is the character that represents the word háo "moat, trench". 堀 is a now rare variant of 窟, which stands for the word kū "cave, burrow, hole", and does not have the same meaning as the former. However, in Japanese, the notion "moat" is represented by ...


1

堀 refers to artificial ditches in general. 壕 is a dry version, and 濠 is a wet version filled with water. Practically, I kind of feel 壕 and 濠 tend to be used in military contexts, whereas 堀 tends to refer to permanent and beautiful ones surrounding large castles. Note that 壕 and 濠 are phono-sementic kanji; the left parts (土 = soil and 氵 = water) contribute to ...


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