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11

They just look identical in romanizations. A Japanese person and a Chinese person might understand each other with their native readings, but the real pronunciations have non-negligible differences. Chinese pinyin final n is always [n], where Japanese final n (as the transcription of ん) is called moraic nasal that changes into diverse sounds according to ...


5

The word "火垂る" in "火垂るの墓" is just an ateji. The meaning is somewhat clear from the movie itself, which is a visualization of the Kobe Air Raid during World War II. In the film, there is a scene where the main characters, a boy and a girl, are watching the bombs of the Kobe air raid burning beyond the window of a train. This is the "...


5

The tsuitachi reading is restricted in meaning, and can only be used to express "the first day of the month". It's spelled 一日 ("one; first" + "day") in kanji, but it originally comes from [月]{つき}[立ち]{たち} (tsuki tachi, "month" + "starting off"). Both readings are possible in the limited context of your sample ...


4

There is a nuance between them which only experienced readers can feel. 莫迦 looks more literary, elevated, fancy or poetic than 馬鹿, and readers will eventually develop such a sense after reading many literary works. I didn't know 莫迦 is related to Sanskrit because I haven't bothered to look it up in the dictionary, but I can easily imagine what kind of ...


3

Possibly 敏雄? There is a Wikipeadia article (linked to French one).


1

For most Japanese Kanji, their on’yomi sounds can easily be deduced from the sounds of the corresponding Korean Hanja in a consistent and expectable manner. The speakers of the Korean language, who have a decent Hanja vocabulary, would notice that these rules exist and take advantage of them to figure out the sounds of Japanese Kanji words. How to convert ...


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