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In short, the difference between 鍵 and 鑰 is that you can safely forget the second one unless you prepare for the top level of kanji recognition test. 鍵 (on-reading: ケン) is the normal way to spell かぎ in kanji (and the only one to spell ケン "key" in compounds, such as [鍵盤]{けんばん} "keyboard"). It is a part of Jōyō list, and even the guidelines for Japanese ...


5

鍵{かぎ} seems to have explained in the other answer. 鑰{やく} is difficult to read. I have never seen this one as a standalone character. So, I searched to a little bit. I found a book called 秘蔵{ひぞう}宝鑰{ほうやく} written by 空海{くうかい}, a Buddhist monk, 1200 years ago. So, a person who follows his Buddhism teaching/school may be familiar with the word. 宝鑰 seems to ...


5

Some 表外漢字 like 狼 and 嘘 are perfectly safe in ordinary writing. Some are simply too difficult. It largely depends on the character. Personally I can read 鰐 but not 鰰/鱸. See also Why are the names of plants and animals often written in katakana? 旧字体 was the standard way of writing in the past, so it's natural if the text is related to periods before WWII. It ...


5

The general situation Many words in Japanese have multiple possible spellings. A good dictionary will include all spellings for each term, and an even better one will note which spellings are common and which are rare. Your specific sample term The term in your sample text is ひあたり. Here is the dictionary headline from the Daijirin entry at Weblio: ひ ...


4

The difference is that 鍵 is the commonly used character in Japanese, being included in the 'Common Use' kanji list (常用漢字), while 鑰 is a rare variant which is almost obsolete in Modern Japanese. So for the practical purposes of learning Japanese, you should learn 鍵 as the kanji which represents 'key/lock'.


3

伍 is an alternative Japanese numeral that is used in formal documents. This documents can include legal documents. When they are used in legal documents, these set of numerals can prevent contracts, checks, and other documents from being changed or manipulated after printing. For example, the standard kanji for 1, 2, and 3 can be incremented up by the ...


3

I believe its a formal kanji used in legal documents. Also I read that its a jinmeiyō kanji, a kanji used for names. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jinmeiy%C5%8D_kanji The author probably chose to write more formal and older kanji because the story is set in the Taisho Period. Thats just my guess.


3

道具 refers to tools in general. 工具 refers to hand tools used to build or fix something, such as hammers, screwdrivers, saws, wire cutters, monkey wrenches and so on: All 工具 are also 道具, but the opposite is not true. Kitchen knifes, nail clippers, clothespins and fish poles are 道具 but not 工具.


2

Actually, it's not unusual to find different forms of the same word in ancient languages. We see this all the time in Ancient Greek, as well as Chinese and Japanese. But as we go back in the language history we see that even if the uses are the same now, they used to be quite different from each other. The Japanese dictionary 広辞苑(こうじえん)says that 陽 used to ...


2

死 [し] is a noun meaning 'death'. It can also be a noun suffix (~死) where the stem gives more information about the death. For example, 事故死 [じこし] (accident+death = accidental death). 死ぬ[しぬ] is a godan verb meaning 'to die' (病気で死ぬ to die from disease) 死去[しきょ] is a verbal noun meaning 'death'. Verbal nouns are words which can act as standalone nouns or can be ...


1

I'm not entirely sure I understand your question, but for the record: Due to the way the Japanese writing system evolved, the same kanji can have many different readings, including onyomi (Chinese origin) and kunyomi (Japanese origin). Usually the way a kanji is read is determined by its context within a sentence or what kanji it is paired with, but with ...


1

学部とは大学を構成する単位を指し、学科とは学部の中で専門分野に特化した科目を指します。 医学部・医学科を例に挙げた場合、医学という大きな枠組みが学部として存在し、その中にある専門分野に特化した医学科が学科ということになります。 Found this through a google search. Although I understand that both of them have dictionary definitions of being "departments", the most common usage probably isn't the case for 学科. What's being said here is that 学科 usually means the ...


1

A 台 is closer to "stand" or "base". It can be big or small, depending on the thing you put on it. A 卓 is closer to "booth" or "counter". It can refer to tables or desks in general, but today it typically refers to some specialized desks you use while standing or sitting by it. For details, please see: When is a table ...


1

Just to address the assumption in the question that 竜 would be more common than 龍: corpus data shows that 龍 is in fact more common than 竜. Disregarding kana spellings we have the following frequencies りゅう 竜 31% ↔ 龍 56% For other shinjitai–kyūjitai pairs we have くに  国 97% ↔ 國 2% けん  剣 100% ↔ 劍 0% くろ  黒 91% ↔ 黑 0% So, 竜 vs. 龍 is special in this regard. (...


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