19

Here are the hit counts from BCCWJ. All entries (1971-2008): わかった: 6492 分かった: 1739 解った: 130 わかります: 2834 分かります: 1065 解ります: 109 おはよう: 1300 お早う: 84 ありがとう: 7090 有難う: 420 有り難う: 102 Recent entries (2000-): わかった: 4162 分かった: 1327 解った: 92 わかります: 2164 分かります: 989 解ります: 100 おはよう: 1140 お早う: 47 ありがとう: 5573 有難う: 332 有り難う: 95 (Note: these should contain a few false-...


14

All the previous nengo are from Chinese Classical Chinese texts - this should set a precedence that, if you aren't familiar with the Chinese Classics, you wouldn't (fully) understand the choice of characters in a nengo. Even though the source text of the current nengo is from the Japanese Man'yōshū, the choice from this context is also kanbun, and steeped ...


12

The verb 「みる」("look"/"see"/"watch") is one case of a word which can be written with one commonly-used general-purpose kanji, and sometimes with other rarer, more specific kanji. The general-purpose kanji writing is 「見る」. Any time you use 「みる」, you can be confident that you can write it 「見る」 and it will be correct (as long as it's a verb which means anything ...


11

人間界 is very commonly used for this purpose, and I recommend you accept this term unless you really have a good reason. 人間界 just means "the world where humans exist", and everyone understands that there are also other animals, plants and bacteria and so on in 人間界. Another good option is 地上界 (Chijōkai, lit. "the world on the Earth") if your other two worlds ...


11

Indeed, わかる is mostly written in kana. Corpus data gives the following proportions: わかる 58280 71% 分かる 17700 22% 解る 2964 4% 判る 2580 3% A priori there seems to be no reason not to use the kanji as わ・かる is a jōyō reading of 分 (taught already in the second year of primary school). Indeed, this publisher explains that for their ...


11

As a matter of fact, I did not even recall the meaning of "command/order" when I first saw 令和. 令 struck me as "just another nice-sounding kanji". Although 玲 and 怜 may be more popular, 令 is not rare at all in person names (e.g., 令二, 令奈). These are so popular and natural in proper nouns that I don't usually bother to care what they mean. In addition, ...


10

You can simply use [誤字]{ご・じ} to mean the wrong letter. I believe it's applicable to both kanji and kana. If you ever take the [漢検]{かん・けん}, starting in level 4 there is a section called [誤字訂正]{ご・じ・てい・せい} where you have to read a sentence with a purposefully misspelled word. You have to identify the word, which kanji is wrong, and then figure out (and write)...


10

Technically speaking, that would still be 「鳴く」. But as an animal lover or pet owner in that particular situation, you might personify the dog out of empathy and end up choosing 「泣く」. That would not be considered an "incorrect" usage.


10

Putting aside the etymology (I did not know which is older), both 竜 and 龍 are very common today, and are actively used by many people. I don't think one is "essentially more beautiful" than the other. Basically it's a matter of taste, and you should respect the kanji choice used by the person who named it. But one tendency is that Western dragons are often ...


9

Although it's etymologically a compound of 落{お}ち+入{い}る, it's now usually written 陥る instead. The NHK漢字表記辞典 recommends writing it 陥る and doesn't mention the other spelling at all. Some dictionaries list both spellings, as you point out; for example, 明鏡国語辞典 lists the word under 陥る but mentions the alternative etymological spelling: 〔表記〕語源を反映させて「落ち入る」とも。 ...


9

These can be divided into two large categories. 上手い ≒ 巧い ≒ good at something, skillful 彼女は料理がうまい。 She is good at cooking. 美味い ≒ 旨い ≒ delicious, yummy この料理はうまい。 This dish is delicious. The difference between 上手い and 巧い is much smaller, but 上手い is "good" in general, while 巧い is closer to "technical" or "skillful". The difference between 美味い and 旨い is ...


9

At the kanji level, 嵌 is not in the joyo kanji list, and it primarily means "inlay" or "pit(fall)". 填 is a variation of a joyo kanji 塡, but the reading of は-まる is not listed in the joyo kanji list. It mainly means "fill (a container, hole, etc)" or "compensate". Both 填まる and 嵌まる are relatively difficult readings, although I believe most adults can read ...


8

The short answer is that 髙, or 「はしごたか」, is an alternate form of 高, and as such some people might use it. It does not represent a new/old character relationship (新字体・旧字体), however 髙 could have been a hand-written form. Apparently, though, this character is a little special, and it seems as though you're not technically allowed to use it in names. This ...


8

It seems to me the answers given so far could be improved and I also find them to be a bit too much opinion-based. Nobody really gave any insight about the etymology and origins of those characters. I found this interesting article, that I will report fully below, that addresses exactly this point and seems to give some explanations that go beyond "looks ...


7

Maybe you know that to say "to take a pill" in Japanese you would say 丸薬をのむ. (I did not put the kanji of のむ intentionally). 飲む is used to say to drink. I mean, to absorb a liquid through your mouth like "to drink water, syrup, beer, ..." On the other side 呑む is used more to mean to swallow. It can be figurative or not. 涙{なみだ}を呑{の}む (to refrain one's anger),...


7

Better use kana instead of some weird or wrong kanji if you're not certain In natural languages, the meaning of words are often extended, changed and modified to fit the speakers needs. Just look up some basic verbs in an English dictionary. When two of these meanings are far enough apart, we can call it two separate words, and it makes sense to use a ...


7

There's no semantic difference, only stylistic one, as long as being used to write the word あこがれる. 憧 is the primary choice because this is the original kanji designated for the word. 憬 didn't have this reading until the word 憧憬 (しょうけい or どうけい) was coined, but you're allowed to use it in order to add some different flavor, too. As an aside, technically ...


7

Here is a publication put out by the 文化審議会, which is a part of 文部科学省 in the Japanese government. http://www.bunka.go.jp/kokugo_nihongo/bunkasingi/pdf/ijidoukun_140221.pdf At a glance it has a lot of good stuff but as @snailboat mentions it is limited to the kanji and readings shown on the 常用漢字表, so you won't find things like 判る and 解る. For joyo kanji, ...


7

Searching the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese, I find the following results:  生きがい   606 results, 75% of total  生き甲斐   186 results, 23% of total  生甲斐    20 results, 2% of total As you can see, in this corpus the most common way to write it is 生きがい. In fact, this is the form recommended by the NHK漢字表記辞典 (the kanji 斐 isn't included on the ...


7

By accent. See: Is there any difference when pronouncing 橋 and 箸? はし【HL】(箸)、はし【LH】(端)、かき【HL】(牡蠣)、かき【LH】(柿) By context. すいせいですか、きんせいですか? → 水星ですか、金星ですか? すいせいですか、ゆせいですか? → 水性ですか、油性ですか? すいせいですか、りくせいですか? → 水棲ですか、陸棲ですか? ぎんせいですか、きんせいですか? → 銀製ですか、金製ですか? By actually changing the reading for known confusing pairs. See: How to Pronounce 化学 "Chemistry"? 化学【...


6

I agree with Axioplase, but 歳 is also とし, which is also the same reading for 年. If I say, "Because I'm getting old," I will use 歳{とし}だから。


6

Naruto's answer covers it well, but it might be helpful to think of these words in terms of their analogues in other uses. For example, 上手い can obviously be connected to 上手{じょうず}, the basic word for being good at something. 美味い can be connected to 美味{おい}しい, the go-to for delicious." 旨い can be connected to [旨味]{うまみ} and the general sense of savoriness -- you ...


6

For Western names, practically speaking, Katatana is best. If you're a citizen of a country where Kanji is used on official documents like your passport, say... China or Korea, then it is common to use either Kanji or Katakana in Japan. For citizens of Western countries, your Kanji name will never be your "official" name (unless you become a citizen of ...


6

What is this kind of variation called? Like is there a name for it? In English they are called "variant (character)", in Japanese 異体字 itaiji. There are different types of variants, often though they come in pairs, one being a "traditional" character (旧字体 kyūjitai) and another a "simplified" character (新字体 shinjitai). This is for variants used in ...


6

悟る is much more nuanced and much less common than 気づく/分かる, but it still can be used safely in day-to-day conversations of ordinary people. Outside religious/philosophical contexts, 悟る is basically closer to "to realize (some important fact/truth)". Its object is usually something out of control of the speaker, something that initially seemed vague or hidden. ...


6

始【はじ】め and 初【はじ】め These are both the stem or noun forms (technically, the 連用形【れんようけい】) of verb はじめる ("to begin something, to start something", transitive / 他動詞【たどうし】). In terms of usage, the kanji 初 is never used to spell the transitive verb -- a related clue. 初め is used to mean "the beginning or start of something", a sense that is broadly ...


6

Both happen to be translated as "rough", but I think their antonyms will help: 粗い is an antonym for 細かい/なめらか/fine-grained/detailed/smooth/etc. 粗い計算, 粗い見積もり, 粗いサンドペーパー, 粗く挽いたコーヒー豆 荒い is an antonym for 温厚/穏やか/calm/gentle/mild/etc. 荒い口調, 荒い性格, 荒い天候, 荒い波, 金遣いが荒い


6

The kanji 主 means "master (of a slave)", "master (of a pet)", "owner", "governor", etc., but it does not mean he is an expert of something. If you simply want to say "grand master (of martial art)", let's use 師範 (shihan), which is a simple and nice term for that concept. It can be used also as an honorific name suffix, just like "sensei". So we get 石師範, ...


6

有る is for possession; 在る is for existence. Though there can be some overlap. And 或る (even though you didn't ask) is actually an adjective for "a particular/certain", like in ある日に.... So in this case, I'm mostly certain it would be 有る since you "have" homework. Here are some words that might help remember the difference: 有 所有 → one's possessions; ...


5

If you look at 漢字, then 蛸 is by far the most common option. This is confirmed by the frequency data in the BCCWJ (Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese, via http://nlb.ninjal.ac.jp): タコ  676 results 蛸   129 results ダコ  32 results 章魚  10 results 鮹   2 results 鱆   0 results タコ is still a lot more popular than any 漢字 version. (But that's to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible