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37

The //h// line in the kana are a bit odd. This is mostly due to history. Derivation Way back at the beginning of Japanese history -- and by that, I mean when we first start seeing text in the Japanese language, in the 700s or so -- the language had a //p// sound, and the five syllables we know today as [は]{ha} [ひ]{hi} [ふ]{fu} [へ]{he} [ほ]{ho} were instead ...


8

No, even native speakers cannot read this. As istrasci says, the blue part is more like タツノン. People can probably identify most katakana in the red part, but it's almost impossible to recognize フランキス as a word. The last ス looks more like ズ. I almost thought this was a fan art made by someone who doesn't understand katakana well, but this is something that ...


6

There is no prescriptive rule that covers where to end the katakana section when you write mimetic words, interjections and slang words in katakana (because they are colloquialisms anyway), so we don't have the "right" answer. It mostly depends on personal interpretation: that whether you want katakana-ify the concept or the word when you do, and ...


5

This vertical bar is a long vowel marker written vertically. Here, it just indicates "Minato" is pronounced with some accent. In English it would be "Mii-nato!" or something. Maybe the speaker said "Minato" slowly and loudly to draw attention, or maybe the speaker is not a native Japanese speaker. You can see the same symbol ...


5

The construction「〜なかで」 On the Japan Foundation website, you can download a PDF that outlines the differences between なか and うち. While that particular issue is not relevant to the question, the document explains all sorts of grammatical constructions using なか, including the「〜なかで」construction. There are two distinct usages according to the document, which the ...


4

The basic structure of the sentence is: 世界中から惜しむ反応が出るというのは、 There are condolences from around the world, which means, 岩田さんに対する思いが惜しむ声にもつながっている Thoughts toward Iwata-san have led to the condolences. ような気がいたしました。 That's what I felt. So I would parse it this way: 世界中からいろんなこう惜しむ反応が出るというのは、 There are various condolences like this from around the world, which ...


3

Your first guess is correct, and the sentence means: At one point using sightseeing buses to evacuate stranded people to hotels was considered, but ultimately abandoned, and the buses left. The title of the video says 立往生解消 and the reporter says おとといから続いていました立ち往生、つい先ほど1時間ほど前にすべて解消されたということなんです, so the buses left without stranded passengers an hour before. ...


3

It is used for Executive Producer according to Wikipedia. エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー (英:executive producer)は、プロデューサーのさらに上の職で、管理職・幹部に当たる。製作/制作、製作総指揮/制作総指揮などの名義でクレジットされる場合が多い。 Note that Nintendo seems to use katakana vesion of エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー for CEO of the company. コンピュータゲーム業界で見られる。任天堂においては「エグゼクティブ・プロデューサー」の肩書は代表取締役社長に対してのみ使用されている。


3

I'd say this is up to individual preference (don't think people change it depending on if it's used as a suffix etc.). If you are set on guidelines, you could follow the recommendation of the Japanese newspaper association (book link). To my best understanding, the recommendation is to prefer あまり (in all cases).


3

Is ぢゃ/ぢゅ/ぢょ used in modern kana usage? Off the top of my head: ぢゃ -- 「[御飯]{ごはん}[茶碗]{ぢゃわん}」「[湯呑]{ゆのみ}[茶碗]{ぢゃわん}」「[芝居]{しばい}[茶屋]{ぢゃや}」「[三軒]{さんげん}[茶屋]{ぢゃや}」 ぢょ -- 「[一本]{いっぽん}[調子]{ぢょうし}」「[盆]{ぼん}[提灯]{ぢょうちん}」「[小田原]{おだわら}[提灯]{ぢょうちん}」 ぢゅ -- I can't think of any (except 大手まんぢゅう and ぼてぢゅう)


2

In handwriting, we are taught in the writing class to put small kana at such position in each square as on the image below (from How to Use Japanese Manuscript Paper): And this is the commonest way how we conceive they should be written. In free handwriting, however, characters are rarely written in equal width, that means a small kana only occupies as much ...


2

Unlike 戻る (which is a plain-form imperative), 順番 by itself is not a direct command to make someone move. In this video, the teacher simply reminded the students that there was something called 順番 that they needed to respect. Semantically, this "順番!" is more like "Remember 順番!". Likewise, we don't say "順番!" in militaristic ...


2

The text and translation I'm not sure what NTSC-U is, and we don't have a lot of context, but their translation seems a bit off. Let's treat each line as a separate statement. 賞金が出たら馬を買おう Breaking that down word by word: [賞金]{Reward   }[が]{[SUBJ]   }[出たら]{if/when comes out   }[馬]{horse   }[を]{[OBJ]   }[買おう]{maybe/will buy} "With a reward, I'll get a ...


2

This シメる is a slangy verb that euphemistically means something like "to chastise (thus making them understand who is the strongest)" or "to give someone a (harsh) lesson (about underground rules, etc)". Usually brute force is implied. It's 締める in kanji, but normally written with katakana. This ~て回る is just "go to various places (...


2

This is not an idiomatic expression, and the subtitle on YouTube is wrong. It just means what it literally means, "I am only allowed to move forward" or "I have no choice but to move on".


2

~であります is a polite version of ~である, which is a stiffer version of だ. ~ということだ is "It is that ~" used to give an explanation. Put together, ~ということであります translates to just "It is that ~". (As a free translation, "basically, what we know is, ..." is not wrong in this context, though.) The remaining part is easy. Since 脱出する is in its ...


2

Yes it's "attacks using armors", or more specifically, shields. From this blog article: また、盾は防具としてだけでなく、剣や斧などのように射程距離1マスの近接武器として使うことも可能。盾を構えて体当たりをくらわす、いわゆる「シールドバッシュ」ですね。 与えるダメージは極めて小さいですが、相手の体重(装備重量)が軽ければ1マスぶん突き飛ばすことができます。 Some other games (eg Dark Souls) have this feature.


1

It's もう戦う気力も尽きかけている, or "I'm running out of spirit/energy to fight". Simply, we never say 気力が付く, although we say 精力が付く.


1

This 謂わば literally means "if I say", but it is an idiom that means "so to speak". The sentence translates to "Between a joint and a joint, there is another joint, so to speak". This should be a reference to the weird modeling of the characters in FF7 on PS1. A human's joint (e.g. the elbow) is usually a thick part of the body, ...


1

The sentence in the title 順番、順番!on its own, Turn , turn!, except in an unusual context, such as a response in a classroom as to what this word is, etc, wouldn't likely be used, since it's a noun. For an imperative, a verb meaning to turn and with the word ending for the 'imperative tense' would be used.


1

When you handwrite on a blank piece of paper or a western-style notebook, characters can (or should) have variable widths and sizes. Characters like り and し should be thin, and kanji like 国 should be wide. IMHO, you should put equal spaces between two characters, even if one of them is a small kana. See these image search results for examples. (Well, in this ...


1

あの人の今、あなたに対する優先度 That person's current priority about/toward you あの人の modifies 優先度 (i.e., "his priority" rather than "your priority"). ~に対する is usually translated like "about ~", "toward ~", "against ~", etc. あの人の今 in isolation does mean "That person's current situation", where 今 is a noun. However,...


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