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18

ウィ is the standard way of transcribing [wi] or [wɪ]. Similarly ウェ is used for [wɛ] (for example website → ウェブサイト) and ウォ for [wɒ] or [wɔ] (for example wombat → ウォンバット or walkman ウォークマン). Here ウ is used to emulate the [w] sound and ィ is a small kana, indicating the vowel. The small ィ also makes ウィ into a digraph (same length as single full-sized kana). ...


7

The canonical rule is as follows: Use hiragana for a subsidiary verb following a te-form, e.g., (持って)いく, (読んで)みる, (作って)おく Use kanji for the second component of a compound verb, following a 連用形, e.g., (やり)直す, (食べ)切る, (降り)始める, (読み)終わる, (動き)回る (Except for verbs that are usually written in kana anyway, e.g., (言い)かける, (考え)あぐねる) Therefore, ふりだした is normally ...


6

Rather than providing a pronunciation closer to the English word, it provides a description of the Japanese pronunciation. The Japanese W sound is essentially spoken by moving from a うto a second vowel. I. E. わ starts as if you are going to say う and then your tongue moves into position to say あ. This is different from English W which uses more rounded ...


5

My Research: So my reasearch has been a little bit unusual for this one, but I found the following from reddit's r/learnjapanese: Dakuten/handakuten on kana where they would normally not be found can imply a muffled, nasal, or slurred sound. I also found some sources on this stack exchange as well. Their question was about dakuten being applied to あ. ...


5

As you may or may not be aware, Japanese employs three writing systems: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Hiragana and Katakana, collectively called Kana, are phonetic writing systems that were developed and modeled after Kanji. Hiragana came about from a modification of cursive script of certain Kanji, whereas Katakana are pieces of these Kanji, repurposed ...


4

Apparently, even historical kana spelling used ウ rather than ワ, as in ウヰスキー (still kept in company names such as ニッカウヰスキー. So where would the usage of ワ come from? As you explicitly refer to Wikipedia, I found a couple of discussions on the kana displayed in the Wikipedia logo, such as this (from 2006): The current Wikipedia logo originally contained the ...


4

Just as you have used various English suffixes to turn nouns into adjectives ("-ly", "-ish", "-ful", ...), there are a number of ways to do this in Japanese, too. Most important ones are: -な: 損 (disadvantage) / 損な (disadvantageous) 不思議 (mystery, wonder) / 不思議な (mysterious) -の 真 (truth) / 真の (true) 永遠 (eternity) / 永遠の (eternal) -っぽい 子供 (child) / 子供っぽい (...


3

You can use 段【だん】 (literally "column") to refer to the vowel of a kana. For example, エ段のカタカナ refers to エ, ケ, テ, and so on. (As an aside, 行【ぎょう】 refers to "row", i.e., consonant. ダ行のカタカナ refers to ダ, ヂ, ヅ, デ and ド.) With this, the idea of: Replace the "-u" with "-eru." can be conveyed like so: 最後の文字の母音をウ段からエ段に変えて「る」を付ける 活用語尾をエ段に変えてルを足す Of ...


3

Firstly, classing Japanese verbs can't be done in the same way as with English verbs. The linguistic terminology is generally different because of the incongruities between the languages. While you can call the English verb "to make" an infinitive, calling 作る or 作ること an infinitive is not quite correct. It is sometimes known as the Dictionary form, or Plain ...


3

Looking at the subtitles on Netflix, it's よっこらしょっと, which seems to be a variation on よっこらしょ, which you can find in dictionaries. As you understood, it's something said when exerting effort.


2

至急、間もなく、リハーサル. The rest seems right (though I can’t quite make out the word before ホール myself. It sounds more like 入門... EDIT: per @naruto’s comment, it is indeed likely 中央.)


2

As you already know, you can parse it as: 『まぁ、よくも、こんな重大な事件を視聴者に説明もせず、しれーっといてられるな。』と思います。 しれっと - as if nothing happened いてられる - is some Kansai dialect thing for いる Yes, you're basically correct. (I first thought the いてられる should be a typo for して(い)られる but after some research I found in this video the speaker clearly says しれーっと、いてられるな. According to ...


2

32ビットを意識して値段を決める means "to determine the price (of our console) taking '32-bit' into consideration" (remove that comma if it is confusing you). ってこと (=ということ) is a nominalizer, and は right after it is a topic particle marking the object of する. 「32ビットを意識して値段を決める」ってことは私たちはしておりません。 We do not do (things like) "determining the price taking '32-bit' into ...


2

The other answers have pointed out that ウィ is the preferred kana combination, which also happens to be the standard suggestion if I type wi on my Japanese keyboard in kana mode. This answer will attempt to state why ワィ would be a bad choice. The most common kana to be followed by small kana are those of the /i/ series used together with ゃゅょ to form ...


2

In handwriting, we are taught in the writing class to put small kana at such position in each square as on the image below (from How to Use Japanese Manuscript Paper): And this is the commonest way how we conceive they should be written. In free handwriting, however, characters are rarely written in equal width, that means a small kana only occupies as much ...


1

This 謂わば literally means "if I say", but it is an idiom that means "so to speak". The sentence translates to "Between a joint and a joint, there is another joint, so to speak". This should be a reference to the weird modeling of the characters in FF7 on PS1. A human's joint (e.g. the elbow) is usually a thick part of the body, ...


1

Unlike 戻る (which is a plain-form imperative), 順番 by itself is not a direct command to make someone move. In this video, the teacher simply reminded the students that there was something called 順番 that they needed to respect. Semantically, this "順番!" is more like "Remember 順番!". Likewise, we don't say "順番!" in militaristic ...


1

The sentence in the title 順番、順番!on its own, Turn , turn!, except in an unusual context, such as a response in a classroom as to what this word is, etc, wouldn't likely be used, since it's a noun. For an imperative, a verb meaning to turn and with the word ending for the 'imperative tense' would be used.


1

When you handwrite on a blank piece of paper or a western-style notebook, characters can (or should) have variable widths and sizes. Characters like り and し should be thin, and kanji like 国 should be wide. IMHO, you should put equal spaces between two characters, even if one of them is a small kana. See these image search results for examples. (Well, in this ...


1

あの人の今、あなたに対する優先度 That person's current priority about/toward you あの人の modifies 優先度 (i.e., "his priority" rather than "your priority"). ~に対する is usually translated like "about ~", "toward ~", "against ~", etc. あの人の今 in isolation does mean "That person's current situation", where 今 is a noun. However,...


1

The どゃ portion Notice that the や is basically the same font size as the ど. This is not どゃ, where the small ゃ is meant to indicate a palatalized glide attaching to the consonant of the previous mora, but rather どや. I'm vaguely familiar with the adverb どやどや used to describe lots of people milling or rushing about; I wonder if it's used here to indicate the ...


1

First of all, I am also no expert, but I have been looking at classical Japanese orthography recently and noticed that many of the "spelling-change rules" seem to follow the same logic as some modern Japanese's collocations/"slang". For example the simplifying of words by seemingly merging sounds: わからない → わかんない。If you take けふ and pronounce ふ as hu not fu, ...


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