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14

The general method of counting in Japanese poetry is by a rhythmic unit known as the mora (morae or moras in plural). A mora is (essentially) the length of a single (full-sized) kana; so is a bit different from a syllable. For instance: A long vowel is counted as one syllable, but two moras. e.g. えい is a single syllable, but is two moras. ん is ...


9

Yes, it is しい. There is a bit of a play-on-words happening here. [禿]{は}げ means "bald(ness)", but is being written in katakana on the top line (ハゲ[頭]{あたま}). The entire bottom row says ハゲ〜しい[熱戦]{ねっ・せん}. Here, the しい is being used in conjunction with ハゲ (written in katakana) to represent the adjective [激]{はげ}しい, which means "intense" or "fierce". So 激しい熱戦 ...


7

とゆーか is a colloquial way of writing というか . It is mentioned as a colloquial form in the entry for というか in Weblio: 「てゆーか」のように転訛した形で表記される場合が多い。 As well as in the EN-JP version of Weblio and in Jisho.


6

Good question. The poster is referring to the reconstructed 8-vowel system for Old Japanese (上代特殊仮名遣) which is inferred from the presence of two ways of transcribing /e/ and two ways of transcribing /o/ with man'yōgana. According to the Wikipedia article on 上代特殊仮名遣, there was no consistent way of indicating these in kana (naturally, since at the time the ...


5

That's because the word is 伸ばす. The 伸 kanji for this word has a reading of の. As you might already know, Japanese has three distinct writing systems (not counting romanizations): ひらがな, カタカナ, and 漢字{かんじ}. It is preferable when possible and when it is normal to use 漢字 in your writing because, while ひらがな and カタカナ are syllabic characters, 漢字 convey ideas and ...


5

It is: 嫌(いや)だ 。 I hate it! https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/en/嫌/#je-4410 It is written in katakana, probably for emphasis.


4

Just as you have used various English suffixes to turn nouns into adjectives ("-ly", "-ish", "-ful", ...), there are a number of ways to do this in Japanese, too. Most important ones are: -な: 損 (disadvantage) / 損な (disadvantageous) 不思議 (mystery, wonder) / 不思議な (mysterious) -の 真 (truth) / 真の (true) 永遠 (eternity) / 永遠の (eternal) -っぽい 子供 (child) / 子供っぽい (...


4

Note that in Japanese poetry, there is a marked avoidance of moraic ん as well as Sino-Japanese lexicon and onbin, so the question is often irrelevant as all the syllables occurring are of form CV. However, if required, きょ would be still one syllable (strictly saying, mora), while じゃく or った be two.


3

The question would be difficult to reach an answer because there is no other similar case, to my knowledge, commonly using two distinct set of letters that have equivalent phonetic values outside those bicameral writing systems and Japanese. In both cases, relationship between sets are conventionally and discretely defined, not such that a general ground has ...


3

(1) First of all, Japanese uses 5 separate scripts, not 3. They are: Hiragana Katakana Kanji Romaji Arabic Numerals All of these scripts are used frequently in Japanese, so it is not correct to say it only uses 3 scripts. (2) Secondly, you ask why romaji are not considered to be two separate scripts since they have upper case and ...


3

Looking at the subtitles on Netflix, it's よっこらしょっと, which seems to be a variation on よっこらしょ, which you can find in dictionaries. As you understood, it's something said when exerting effort.


2

This is simply because 考え has many meanings and is translated into English in various ways. 考えを示す is not really a tricky idiom; it's a set phrase that means "to show one's 考え", where 考え can be an idea, a plan, a suggestion or an opinion depending on the context. In your example, 考え refers to his plan.


2

Firstly none of this is about grammar. I have edited the question tags. Now on to the main question. The choice between katakana, hiragana and kanji is only relevant in the written language. It is possible to write everything in hiragana or katakana, but it would make it rather difficult to read. For example, some books for young children are written ...


2

I'm guessing that either you misheard, or if you've posted the text as seen, then whoever transcribed it misheard. The key phrase here isn't 方【ほう】を貸【か】す ("to lend a way"?), which doesn't make sense, as you correctly note. That rendering seems like a mondegreen, a goofy phrase based on mishearing something. The phrase is instead probably supposed to be 法【...


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