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37

The //h// line in the kana are a bit odd. This is mostly due to history. Derivation Way back at the beginning of Japanese history -- and by that, I mean when we first start seeing text in the Japanese language, in the 700s or so -- the language had a //p// sound, and the five syllables we know today as [は]{ha} [ひ]{hi} [ふ]{fu} [へ]{he} [ほ]{ho} were instead ...


25

Yes, mixtures of this type are possible, and it's quite common with certain words. For example, 石鹸 has a rather difficult second kanji, and the word is often written 石けん instead. 轟音 is often written ごう音. And so on. In your example, none of the characters is particularly rare and all of them are on the 常用漢字表 (the official jōyō kanji chart), so ...


21

I read your question "Do Japanese people see [tsu] as a smiling face" and read over the question several times before I got it. And I'm not a native Japanese reader (or speaker). Just like your ت (which sort of looks like a smiling face to me) and the German ü (to Japanese eyes, say), the Japanese ツ doesn't look like a smiling face to any eye who has become ...


18

ウィ is the standard way of transcribing [wi] or [wɪ]. Similarly ウェ is used for [wɛ] (for example website → ウェブサイト) and ウォ for [wɒ] or [wɔ] (for example wombat → ウォンバット or walkman ウォークマン). Here ウ is used to emulate the [w] sound and ィ is a small kana, indicating the vowel. The small ィ also makes ウィ into a digraph (same length as single full-sized kana). ...


16

I suppose this banner struck OP as "super bizarre" for either of the two reasons: Because you are a diligent Japanese learner who only learned how traditional textbooks say about when to use kanji or kana. Because you have a kind of fascination with kanji, as a design element. You regard kanji as cool, and kana as mere, dull, phonetic symbols. Whichever is ...


14

あ゛ used to be commonly used in manga to express an exclamation — "aagh!" or something like that. I feel it has become less common (if not rare) these days. え゛、い゛、お゛、の゛ and so on are sometimes used in a similar way. You may see them in casual blogs and tweets, but never in formal documents. ヴ is commonly used to express the 'v' sound in loanwords (eg ...


14

The general method of counting in Japanese poetry is by a rhythmic unit known as the mora (morae or moras in plural). A mora is (essentially) the length of a single (full-sized) kana; so is a bit different from a syllable. For instance: A long vowel is counted as one syllable, but two moras. e.g. えい is a single syllable, but is two moras. ん is counted as a ...


12

Kanji were originally from Chinese. Japanese used extremely accented Chinese (sorta like what they do with English now) to pronounce Middle Chinese words, which eventually became 音読み. For example 日本 /njit.pon/ became /nippon/. For 訓読み, they simply find the nearest native Japanese word in meaning. You can imagine an English person seeing 走 and pronouncing it "...


12

I think it means "the e with the hook". If you compare エ with ヱ, ヱ has a hook in the first horizontal.


12

In this webpage 沖縄の言葉で書かれた注意書きがわからなすぎる, there is the following picture: Comparing this one with the one in your post makes me think that maybe it is just your picture is missing some paint.


11

1)Yes, an international standardized character alphabet exists for transcribing the sounds of all human Languages. It's called the International Phonetic Alphabet and it is maintained by the International Phonetic Association (both are acronymized as IPA). The most recent version of the alphabet was created 1969 and their most recent and currently operative ...


11

Short answer: no. For details, read on. There aren't any rules (as far as I know, anyway). Generally the insertion of spaces in texts written purely in hiragana serves only to improve readability. The writer can take liberties in doing this. Some common patterns do arise, though. First, you generally tend to break things up word by word, so each ...


11

When writing on a grid, they go in the upper right hand corner of the square below. Similarly, full-stops 。 and commas 、 also go in the upper right hand corner. source full image In normal handwriting, the distances become closer than on the grid, of course. (Also, 振り仮名 and Japanese "italicizing" (indicated by dots) go into the column on the right, see Do ...


11

There's a few different things going on in your question: A general question about whether you can write words in mixed kanji kana orthography An implicit question about when you can / cannot do so. Two specific examples Starting with the first question, all Japanese language users including native speakers write some words using a mixture of kana and ...


11

It's グサ, a common onomatopoeia for a sound of "stab". It also describes how someone's harsh word sticks into your heart. It's listed on jisho.org in the form ぐさりと. It looks like ワ, too, but ワ does not take dakuten, as you know.


10

Extensive use of hiragana by intent will make yourself look immature, childish, unserious, drowsy, cute, innocent, or sometimes less intelligent, depending on the context. A good but exaggerated example is found here. A very childish character in a game, who is always talking in hiragana. …ふわぁ…あなただぁれぇー?…ぷろでゅーさー?…えぇー…かわいいー?…あいどる?うんー…いいよー…やるぅー…あいどるやるぅー。…で、...


10

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be helpful....


10

The reason is very simple: universal education. ゟ is not a "kana" but an abbreviation (合略仮名) used in the 1800s. In other words, it is not an outdated letter like long s (ſ), but a scribal abbreviation like "Ↄ̄" for "contra". It was mainly in use when writing was limited to a small literate class, and when language began being taught to the public at large, ...


10

In general, if you're storing any Japanese text that needs to be sorted, you probably want to go with Kanatype insensitive. Why would you want it like this? Because it makes sorting more intuitive in terms of Japanese language. In english, since we have only one writing system, it's easy to sort things algorithmically. We simply order the characters by ...


9

There are no character-level differences. Hiragana and katakana are, for all intents and purposes, the same, differing only in how they are used with regard to the broader idea of choice of system. You say you know what each is used for, so that's the key distinction you need to focus on. I think one thing we might be able to mention is elongated vowels. ...


9

This is a difference between historical kana use (歴史的仮名遣) and modern kana use (現代仮名遣い). The kana orthography has been changed over time to reflect newer pronunciations. In this case, the title is written using an older spelling. Take a look at this official cabinet announcement (from 1986) and scroll down to the bottom half. It contains a rather large ...


9

I never see it used this way in Japanese emoticons, and I just went ahead and checked every single entry for かおもじ in Google's Windows Japanese IME, and there wasn't a single example of one using it as a face.


9

ちょ is what we call a digraph; notice that the よ is small, not full-sized. If you wanted to write "chiyoshi," it would have to be ちようし, not ちょうし. I'm not going to list every digraph and their Romanizations/pronunciations here because there are tons of them, but if you check the Wikipedia articles for Katakana and Hiragana, there should be a chart of all of ...


9

Per l'électeur's response above, 北ミ: 北, kita and ミ, mi 三, mi


9

Yes, it is しい. There is a bit of a play-on-words happening here. [禿]{は}げ means "bald(ness)", but is being written in katakana on the top line (ハゲ[頭]{あたま}). The entire bottom row says ハゲ〜しい[熱戦]{ねっ・せん}. Here, the しい is being used in conjunction with ハゲ (written in katakana) to represent the adjective [激]{はげ}しい, which means "intense" or "fierce". So 激しい熱戦 ...


8

As you pointed out, there is no single correct pronunciation of Classical Japanese. It would be more accurate to teach different pronunciations used in different periods, but it would be probably too complicated to teach at schools. The pronunciation of Classical Japanese taught at high schools is the newest one used in Meiji period and later. (I do not ...


8

In this context, きれる does not mean "to be cut", but rather attaches to the 連用形 (-i form) of a verb and means "to be able to completely [verb]". cf. the EDICT entry for 切れる: (suf,v1) (16) to be able to do completely When used in this sense, きれる is typically written in kana rather than as 切れる. So, we have 死にきれる (that's the verb 死ぬ, not the noun 死 + ...


8

This is the hiragana そ. You may be confused because of the font.


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