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69

In modern Japanese these pairs are pronounced exactly the same: ず, づ are pronounced either [dzu] or [zu]. じ, ぢ are pronounced either [dʑi] or [ʑi]. (the first sounding like the English J and the second like the French J, but both are with the middle of the tongue raised to the hard palate, producing what seems like a softer pronunciation). So in short, ...


42

In Katakana, we use ー for some long vowels indeed. But words with it, like ユーロ are spelt this way! However, in your case, there is no such word よーく、 ようく nor よおく. What this dash means is that the sound is lengthened. The word is just "よく". So, when the author wrote "よーくわかる" he meant "I reaaaaally understand". That's it!


33

This question should be broken into two different questions: When and how did small-tsu come to represent consonant gemination. When and how did consonant gemination (as represented by small-tsu) come to be in Japanese. (For those who don't know the term: gemination simply means doubling of sounds, usually consonants. It's easy to get the sense ...


29

It isn't 100 percent clear, but the following is the “well-established” theory: Hiragana (平仮名) As noted in your other question, hiragana was originally called 女手{おんなで}. In the late Nara, early Heian periods, 万葉仮名{まんようがな} written in 草書体 (sosho style) was used for “unofficial” texts such as Japanese poems (和歌{わか}), etc. From this 万葉仮名, women in the imperial ...


24

Yes, mixtures of this type are possible, and it's quite common with certain words. For example, 石鹸 has a rather difficult second kanji, and the word is often written 石けん instead. 轟音 is often written ごう音. And so on. In your example, none of the characters is particularly rare and all of them are on the 常用漢字表 (the official jōyō kanji chart), so ...


20

The word you are looking for is 「行{ぎょう}」. We say 「ア行」、「カ行」、「サ行」, etc. How could I say "I think the last kana was a 'g—' kana...'? You could say: 「最後{さいご}の文字{もじ}はガ行のかなだったと思{おも}う。」 In case someone is wondering what we call the horizontal rows of kana on that chart, they are called 「段{だん}」. We say 「ア段」、「イ段」, etc.


18

In reference to Sawa's request for an example, キャンディ is a case of キャ being used to transcribe English ca. I asked my Japanese teacher exactly this question many years ago. The reply was that the vowel in English candy is higher (in phonetic terms) than the low front vowel in RP English cast. The fact that キャ is palatalised raises the vowel and makes it ...


18

I read your question "Do Japanese people see [tsu] as a smiling face" and read over the question several times before I got it. And I'm not a native Japanese reader (or speaker). Just like your ت (which sort of looks like a smiling face to me) and the German ü (to Japanese eyes, say), the Japanese ツ doesn't look like a smiling face to any eye who has become ...


15

From what I've observed, it varies from shop to shop: by publisher → by author name → by book title by author name → by book title by library → by series number (In case of 文庫 [ぶんこ] (library), 新書 [しんしょ] (library of pocket-sized paperbacks) by relevance/context (in untraditional bookstores like ヴィレッジ・ヴァンガード, 松丸本舗 [まつまるほんぽ]) Also, 文庫 and ...


15

I suppose this banner struck OP as "super bizarre" for either of the two reasons: Because you are a diligent Japanese learner who only learned how traditional textbooks say about when to use kanji or kana. Because you have a kind of fascination with kanji, as a design element. You regard kanji as cool, and kana as mere, dull, phonetic symbols. Whichever is ...


14

The general method of counting in Japanese poetry is by a rhythmic unit known as the mora (morae or moras in plural). A mora is (essentially) the length of a single (full-sized) kana; so is a bit different from a syllable. For instance: A long vowel is counted as one syllable, but two moras. e.g. えい is a single syllable, but is two moras. ん is ...


12

Kanji were originally from Chinese. Japanese used extremely accented Chinese (sorta like what they do with English now) to pronounce Middle Chinese words, which eventually became 音読み. For example 日本 /njit.pon/ became /nippon/. For 訓読み, they simply find the nearest native Japanese word in meaning. You can imagine an English person seeing 走 and pronouncing it "...


12

I think it means "the e with the hook". If you compare エ with ヱ, ヱ has a hook in the first horizontal.


11

I think if you watch this video for 24 hours straight, you will have learned basic hiragana and katakana without much effort. My apologies for any ill effects on your mental health. Complete Japanese Alphabet Song - Katakana - Hiragana - 日本語


11

The equivalent of "alphabetical order" for kana that hangs on the wall of classrooms is as follows: あかさたなはまやらわん いきしちにひみ り うくすつぬふむゆる えけせてねへめ れ おこそとのほもよろを I believe children are introduced to them based on this, probably vertically (i.e. あいうえお、かきくけこ and so on). [Thanks to Jamie Taylor in the comments.] I can't really give specific advice ...


11

Pronunciation-wise, there is no difference in the standard dialect. Some dialects may preserve the distinction between the two sounds, but most of the words that used to be spelled with づ and ぢ are now spelled with ず and じ in the standard language. (In other words, relying on the standard spelling won't tell you when to use "dzu" and "dji" in these dialects, ...


11

1)Yes, an international standardized character alphabet exists for transcribing the sounds of all human Languages. It's called the International Phonetic Alphabet and it is maintained by the International Phonetic Association (both are acronymized as IPA). The most recent version of the alphabet was created 1969 and their most recent and currently operative ...


11

Short answer: no. For details, read on. There aren't any rules (as far as I know, anyway). Generally the insertion of spaces in texts written purely in hiragana serves only to improve readability. The writer can take liberties in doing this. Some common patterns do arise, though. First, you generally tend to break things up word by word, so each ...


11

Extensive use of hiragana by intent will make yourself look immature, childish, unserious, drowsy, cute, innocent, or sometimes less intelligent, depending on the context. A good but exaggerated example is found here. A very childish character in a game, who is always talking in hiragana. …ふわぁ…あなただぁれぇー?…ぷろでゅーさー?…えぇー…かわいいー?…あいどる?うんー…いいよー…やるぅー…あいどるやるぅー。…で、...


11

In this webpage 沖縄の言葉で書かれた注意書きがわからなすぎる, there is the following picture: Comparing this one with the one in your post makes me think that maybe it is just your picture is missing some paint.


11

It's グサ, a common onomatopoeia for a sound of "stab". It also describes how someone's harsh word sticks into your heart. It's listed on jisho.org in the form ぐさりと. It looks like ワ, too, but ワ does not take dakuten, as you know.


10

When writing on a grid, they go in the upper right hand corner of the square below. Similarly, full-stops 。 and commas 、 also go in the upper right hand corner. source full image In normal handwriting, the distances become closer than on the grid, of course. (Also, 振り仮名 and Japanese "italicizing" (indicated by dots) go into the column on the right, see Do ...


10

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be helpful....


10

The reason is very simple: universal education. ゟ is not a "kana" but an abbreviation (合略仮名) used in the 1800s. In other words, it is not an outdated letter like long s (ſ), but a scribal abbreviation like "Ↄ̄" for "contra". It was mainly in use when writing was limited to a small literate class, and when language began being taught to the public at large, ...


10

In general, if you're storing any Japanese text that needs to be sorted, you probably want to go with Kanatype insensitive. Why would you want it like this? Because it makes sorting more intuitive in terms of Japanese language. In english, since we have only one writing system, it's easy to sort things algorithmically. We simply order the characters by ...


10

There's a few different things going on in your question: A general question about whether you can write words in mixed kanji kana orthography An implicit question about when you can / cannot do so. Two specific examples Starting with the first question, all Japanese language users including native speakers write some words using a mixture of kana and ...


10

The character immediately below 「浅クサ区」 is not a kana. It is the 崩{くず}し字{じ} ("cursive style") for the kanji 「北」. Thus, the name of the section is 「北ミスジ丁」(北三筋丁in kanji). https://kakijun.jp/page/0524200.html


9

It results from one of the components in 竹 , which is in turn taken from the radical sitting on the top of 箇 (a generic counter for pieces).


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