Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

27

Because it is like a famous Japanese poet 相田{あいだ}みつを's style of writing. He often used the word だなぁ. And おもさをたいせきでわる is not funny in itself, it is a mathematical sentence. I give a little explanation of this funny. 相田みつを mainly wrote about the importance of life, human life, encouragement and love for afflicted people in his poems with easy words. And だなぁ ...


17

To explain the phrase, it seems the phrase 'I can eat glass, it doesn't hurt me' was collected in a variety of languages by someone at Harvard University in the 1990s. https://web.archive.org/web/19990116232350/http://hcs.harvard.edu/~igp/glass.html "The Project is based on the idea that people in a foreign country have an irresistable urge to try to say ...


10

嘘だよ is likely to mean "I am joking." One way to say "you are lying" is to use an interrogative form: 嘘だろ!? / 冗談だろ!? Isn't that a joke? マジかよ!? Really!? Examples above are very casual. Of course we can make them formal by using 敬語: 嘘ですよね? / 冗談ですよね? 本当ですか? (note that マジ is a casual saying of 本当). If we use a normal sentence, it ...


9

Another is: うそつけ (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}け)! - Liar! Comes from 嘘{うそ}をつく, to lie From comments: うそつき (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}き) - Liar; Someone who lies


9

It's a classic Japanese joke, which is also very derogatory. Google Translate did a good job in this case — it obviously understands that this phrase is more or less idiomatic. This sentence actually means "Please make your face the only thing that's joking here" or more descriptively, "No more joke please, your face is already funny enough." ...


8

I don't think there are any call-and-response jokes in Japanese, which is sort of an important feature of knock-knock jokes. As for jokes, which follow a particular pattern, there are simple plays on words, which everyone knows and which involve two words or phrases, which are (at least quasi-)homophones, usually at the beginning and at the end of a sentence,...


7

イヤーンバカーン is an cliched, interjection-like set phrase. いやーん (嫌ーん) literally means "no" or "I dislike it" and ばかーん (馬鹿ーん) is "idiot." It's not a refusal but rather an aged, stereotyped word used when a woman toys or trifle with a man. So the person who said it is childishly and jokingly mimicking a sexy adult woman. Probably it's a wordplay similar to a ...


7

The translation of Google Translate is almost fine, but ガラス is not a glass for drinking but glass as material. See this question. I don't think it's a well-known idiom, proverb, joke, cliche, etc. It's just a weird Japanese sentence that is grammatical but nonsensical. Anyway, how is this bug related to the meaning of the Japanese text?


7

御誕生昨日, 御誕生先日, 御誕生前日 Will it translate or will it just seem strange? These won't make much sense, and I don't think they'd look/sound really interesting or funny, I'm afraid. As you might already know, we usually say "Happy Belated Birthday" as 「遅くなったけど、お誕生日おめでとう」「遅れてしまったけど、お誕生日おめでとう」 or maybe 「過ぎちゃったけど、お誕生日おめでとう」 etc. I think you could jokingly say to ...


5

About the nuance of お嬢さま. The difference is visual. Someone described as お嬢様, besides being a young unmarried female, has also cultivated (or been raised to have) a sense of upper-class refinement, most immediately evident through her appearance and attitude. Perhaps in between Scarlett O'Hara and Holly Golightly? Looking closely at that フジ三太郎 comic strip,...


5

「ジェネギャ」 is as @marasai stated in the comments above. I had to google around, however, to find out what 「ジェネギャな」 means as an adjective as no one around me uses it. Fortunately, I was able to find enough example usages to conclude that: 「ジェネギャな」 is synonymous to 「[時代遅]{じだいおく}れな」. Thus, 「ジェネギャなジョーク」 should mean "outdated or old-fashioned kind of jokes"...


4

I think the strip is about the moral cruelty of Japanese life. The dutiful young man discovered something – a lost ticket maybe – which might be to the disadvantage of his customer, and calls out to her. Instead of heeding his apparently audible call (the man to the left of the woman did hear it after all), the woman decides that calling conventions are ...


4

marasai wrote in a comment: ジェネギャ is probably an abbreviation for ジェネレーション・ギャップ (generation gap).


4

It will never sound like a haiku because it doesn't follow the 5-7-5 pattern. Do you know how Japanese haiku are read? What's worse, it lacks the "story". 靴の紐 was delivered all of the sudden, and we can't understand how it relates to the other part. If there were enough context, this theoretically would work as a joke. Oh, I found a real example: ...


4

I think it's a reference to a famous children's song めだかの学校, where a school of めだか is...er, a school of めだか. 短い答えでごめんなさい。


3

日本新 is shortened version of a word 日本新記録, which means new Japanese record.


3

To bring this to a finality, I will answer my own question. 横に歯磨き refers to brushing teeth sideways, and the joke, which is more of a comical overstatement, is referring to a living space that is so crammed that he does not have space to brush his teeth. So while there are cramped spaces in larger cities in Tokyo, it is not necessary a pun or a particular ...


3

I think it depends on the context. But maybe... In キン肉マン(kin-niku-man), an old famous manga, many heroes have a kanji on their forehead. Be affected by this manga, writing a kanji on the sleeper's forehead became a common prank in Japan. Typically, the kanji is [肉]{にく}(meats), because this kanji is on the main hero's forehead. Next, there is a proverb 「[食]{...


2

This ネタにされている does not mean there is such a recurring joke. This ネタ just refers to a "(funny/amusing) conversation piece". The sentence is saying Kira's story is used as a good conversational topic by ordinary people, or simply, people are rumoring about him. The author is saying cool-minded people must understand Kira has already been driven into a corner. ...


2

I read “おもさをたいせきでわるんだなあ みつど” by verbatim as; 重さを体積で割るんだなあ、密度 – It’ s weight divided by volume, density, isn’t it. Though I’m not good at mathematics, the density of material can be measured in proportion of weight and volume. “みつど- ” can be a play of word of 密度- density with the name of (相田)みつお, a famous author of aphoristic poems but I’m not sure of it.


2

Yes that is 疲れが足に来る, literally "fatigue coming to the legs". We also commonly say 腰に来る and 首に来る without explicitly saying 疲れが. Of course 頭に来る means something different. If I understand the context correctly (the speaker is a heavy 風俗 user), と is emphasized probably because leg fatigue happens only in the case of 彼女とする ("having fun together with a girl", i.e....


2

メスブタ is used when people insult women. This オスブタ is a parody of メスブタ. め is used when people insult something or themselves. It means "a pig that covets anything", and it is similar to 欲張り. We sometimes write phrases with emphasis on vowel like that. 嫌いではない、嫌いじゃない and 嫌いじゃあない are the same meaning, and they are more casual in decreasing order. As for your ...


2

三三九度 is a ceremony performed at a wedding. 高砂や is a Japanese comic story related to a wedding. 坊やおなかで means "their child in her womb." So the sentence means "Their child in her womb tells a Japanese comic story 高砂や at their wedding". That is about "shotgun wedding".


2

Your translation of the third line is wrong. 僕はもう君以外何もいらない。 I don't need anything but you. 君だけが欲しいんだ。 I only want you. 金はもうあるし。 (Because) I've already gotten (enough) money. / There is already money. Well, that's all what these lines say. No puns, no wordplay. To interpret this as a joke, yes you need to understand the cultural ...


2

(Note: the impressions below come from the various manga I've read, which might or might not reflect the realities of life in Japan. But then, the subject is a manga too...) お嬢さん or (お嬢ちゃん) is indeed what you would call a small girl, e.g. if you don't know her name but need to call her somehow (かわいいお嬢ちゃんですね!). It has a nuance of "little princess". However, ...


2

Maybe its just me, but every Japanese class I've ever taken always had "お名前は(insert name)です。” within the first week.


2

The following may be one: わたし は げんき です。 Or perhaps the whole phrase: はじめまして。わたしはnameです。どうぞよろしくおねがいします。


1

Google translator gave me "joke should only be in your face" That makes perfect sense. Good job, Google translator! The jab 冗談は顔だけにして ... seems pretty old, maybe from the 1960s or 1970s ? http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1018265750 -- もう昔のことで名前も思い出せませんが、漫才コンビがいて、顔が気の毒なボケ役のぼけに対して、相方が、「冗談は顔だけにしてくれ」と言ったのが、始まりです。(やすし・...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible