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Some 表外漢字 like 狼 and 嘘 are perfectly safe in ordinary writing. Some are simply too difficult. It largely depends on the character. Personally I can read 鰐 but not 鰰/鱸. See also Why are the names of plants and animals often written in katakana? 旧字体 was the standard way of writing in the past, so it's natural if the text is related to periods before WWII. It ...


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Essentially answered in the comment, but hopefully the following clarifies your question. First of all, 常用漢字 is not about simplifying characters and almost never did, except 燈 → 灯. https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B8%B8%E7%94%A8%E6%BC%A2%E5%AD%97#1981%E5%B9%B4%E3%81%AE%E5%88%B6%E5%AE%9A%E6%99%82%EF%BC%88%E5%BD%93%E7%94%A8%E6%BC%A2%E5%AD%97%E3%81%A8%E3%81%AE%...


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The term 表外漢字 has somewhat different usage in technical sense and everyday parlage. Strictly speaking, there are 1'022 official 表外漢字. They are those designated by the National Language Council of Japan (国語審議会) in year 2000, delineated in this table: 1 (see also 2; source: 3). As it is easy to observe, some of these are even 常用, to say nothing of 人名用. But ...


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Modern noun [恋]{こい} ("love", generally referring more specifically to romantic or carnal love) is derived as the [連用形]{れんようけい} (also known as the "continuative form" or "stem form") of verb [恋う]{こう}. The historical kana spelling for the verb ([歴史的仮名遣い]{れきしてきかなづかい}, see also the Wikipedia articles in Japanese and English) was [恋ふ]...


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These kanji are definitely taught. One way or another. I did not go through the education system in Japan so I cannot directly speak to what happens in the classroom. But I have several textbooks and references used in elementary school and high school. All these resources present these kanji and the textbooks (like books on culture and geography, for ...


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