8

There's not really any way of interpreting なかなかいいじゃない as anything but a rhetorical negative. Firstly, you would never ordinarily make いい negative by suffixing じゃない - it would always change to よくない. So this makes it clear that the じゃない is a rhetorical feature affixed to the sentence more generally rather than a negation of いい. And secondly, なかなか generally has ...


5

Interrogative phrases ending in だ (with the exception of dialects) are used to demand information. As in the following: 誰だ!・何者だ! - "Who!", "Who goes there!" どこだ! - "Where!", "Where is it!" いつだ! - "When!", "When is it!" 何だ! - "What!" 何のつもりだ! - "What are you trying to do!", "What's your intention!" おい!そこでなにしてるんだ! - "Hey! What are you doing over ...


5

I think you're onto something here and I'm not completely sure how to best analyze it, but this might be a first start. The usual って in reported speech has no effect on the pitch. However, there is a colloquial use of って which indeed raises the pitch of the last mora before it: 食べるって【LHLLL】 normal pitch accent 食べるって【LHHLL】 colloquial pitch accent The ...


4

You can definitely make yourself understood by saying 「もう1つ?」 with rising intonation, but it's better to use the appropriate counter for bottles ("本"). And we usually add some verb even in the most casual settings. To your friend, colloquially: もう[1本]{いっぽん}[行]{い}く? (行く ≒ "go on" here) もう1本いる? もう1本[飲]{の}む? If you have to say this politely: もう1本お[飲]{の}...


4

Really the pitch accent for each word depends on dialects, but in general it's not actually so hard to understand when somebody talks with different pitch accents, so maybe that's why many textbooks and dictionaries don't write much about the accent for each words. I was born in Tokyo but had army service in Hokkaido, there people refered to me as "kaWAsaki"...


2

I don't think many Japanese learning resources cover it, for the intonation studies are still in its earliest stage, as far as I know. I'm not an expert in Japanese intonation either, but it's fairly easy to show the difference in my own voice. https://clyp.it/qa2xdoip It says in the following order: いいね (rising) "Sounds good." いいね (fall-rise) &...


1

In that situation, we would use, "もう[一本]{いっぽん}". [助数詞]{じょすうし} can be quite confusing even to native Japanese speakers sometimes. Once the beer is poured into a glass, it becomes 「[一杯]{いっぱい}」. I would say 「[一つ]{ひとつ}」 is usually used for solid objects, but it's not applicable to all solid objects, though. Here are links which might be helpful for you to get ...


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